A limited but lively once-over for young dinophiles.

YOU CAN BE A PALEONTOLOGIST!

The resident expert of PBS Kids’ Dinosaur Train explains what fossil hunters do and study.

Sampson’s animated descriptions of where fossils are found, how paleontologists dig them up and transport them to museums for reconstruction and research, and what can be learned about dino diets and prehistoric habitats from teeth or other features offer a simplified but enticing view of the work and some of its rewards. Though the author leaves out any direct mention of the academic training that professional paleontologists must undergo, he mentions several techniques and activities that won’t be beyond even younger amateurs—and also touts the general value of getting outdoors and “playing in nature.” Children with a modicum of familiarity with the subject will find the exclamation mark–strewn text patronizing, and they will yawn at the hyped revelation at the end that turns out to be the less-than-fresh news that birds are dino descendants. The enthusiastic text is accompanied by photos of scientists (all apparently white, nearly all male) at work in field and lab, with occasional portraits of fleshed-out dinosaurs in prehistoric settings to crank up the drama.

A limited but lively once-over for young dinophiles. (glossary) (Informational picture book. 7-9)

Pub Date: April 4, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4263-2728-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: National Geographic Kids

Review Posted Online: March 6, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2017

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The story feels a bit contrived, but Ada will be a welcome addition to the small circle of science-loving girls in the...

ADA LACE, ON THE CASE

From the Ada Lace series , Vol. 1

Using science and technology, third-grader Ada Lace kicks off her new series by solving a mystery even with her leg in a cast.

Temporarily housebound after a badly executed bungee jump, Ada uses binoculars to document the ecosystem of her new neighborhood in San Francisco. She records her observations in a field journal, a project that intrigues new friend Nina, who lives nearby. When they see that Ms. Reed’s dog, Marguerite, is missing, they leap to the conclusion that it has been stolen. Nina does the legwork and Ada provides the technology for their search for the dognapper. Story-crafting takes a back seat to scene-setting in this series kickoff that introduces the major players. As part of the series formula, science topics and gadgetry are integrated into the stories and further explained in a “Behind the Science” afterword. This installment incorporates drones, a wireless camera, gecko gloves, and the Turing test as well as the concept of an ecosystem. There are no ethnic indicators in the text, but the illustrations reveal that Ada, her family, and bratty neighbor Milton are white; Nina appears to be Southeast Asian; and Mr. Peebles, an inventor who lives nearby, is black.

The story feels a bit contrived, but Ada will be a welcome addition to the small circle of science-loving girls in the chapter-book world. (Fiction. 7-9)

Pub Date: Aug. 29, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4814-8599-9

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 24, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2017

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Young environmentalists will appreciate seeing how facts can defy frenzy.

COUGAR FRENZY

From the Orca Echoes series

Through the investigations of young Cricket and her friends, readers learn how to distinguish evidence of a cougar from other animals—and are briefed on cougar conservation and monitoring.

When Cricket and her friend Shilo notice a foul smell coming from piled-up snow and branches under a bush, Cricket suspects that a cougar has hidden its dinner. Her father, Warden McKay, proves her right when he shows up at her school, giving an emergency presentation about cougars. A cougar has been seen in their village, which is located inside Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta. After Cricket’s dad informs kids about some cougar facts, Principal Singh gives students a rare week off from school. It’s odd, then, that the warden’s children proceed to wander the village. However, McDowell’s books about Cricket typically favor facts about wildlife above all else, and, also typically, this one does not disappoint. It even clarifies one statistic as specifically Canadian. Overall, the dialogue is more natural than in Salamander Rescue (2016), if equally packed with information. The nine chapters and epilogue are accessible, entertaining, and empowering for young naturalists. The compelling plot twist: Anxious villagers are accusing cougars of a series of large-mammal crimes. Cricket, knowing that cougar relocation can be fatal, wants to ensure continued, occasional village visits by a family of tracked cougars. She devises a scheme to trap the real culprit. Illustrations are pleasant enough, depicting a largely white cast, though at least three characters have Asian surnames.

Young environmentalists will appreciate seeing how facts can defy frenzy. (Fiction. 7-9)

Pub Date: Oct. 8, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-4598-2064-7

Page Count: 96

Publisher: Orca

Review Posted Online: June 10, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2019

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