A bold, personal collection of a pastor’s wife’s experiences and advice.

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I'm Sleeping With The Pastor!

An inside look at the life of a pastor’s wife, along with advice on how to succeed in such a role.

“Marriage is under siege,” warns Whitaker in her debut self-help guide—and people need to be prepared to “live beyond fairy tales.” Whitaker strings together anecdotes, advice and axioms in this guide, specifically geared to pastors’ wives; as a pastor’s wife herself, she recognizes the challenges unique to women in this role. She writes about America’s rising divorce rate, and in a section titled “Waterproof Matches: Enhancing Intimacy,” she details the numerous ways readers can bring passion back into their marriages, as well as steps they can take to prevent conflict. Helpful reminders, such as having a “win-win” approach to arguments, stand alongside apt advice, such as avoiding turning everything into a spiritual discussion. In “Life Vests,” the author urges that readers eat right and exercise and discusses how it’s crucial to care for one’s body as well as one’s soul. Citing Benjamin Franklin’s adage, “To lengthen thy life, lessen thy meals,” she writes about the psychological impact of good health while owning up to her own struggle with her weight. She also takes on topics such as finances, infidelity and grief, offering practical advice intermingled with personal stories and colorful examples. This candid, relatable book dishes out honesty and humor on every page. Whitaker’s highly accessible style and appealing personality make the book read more like an intimate chat with a close friend than a self-help guide replete with criticism. Most of all, her guide has the resounding ring of truth.

A bold, personal collection of a pastor’s wife’s experiences and advice.

Pub Date: May 20, 2013

ISBN: 978-0978995300

Page Count: 354

Publisher: EARSEN Publishing Company

Review Posted Online: Aug. 13, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2013

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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