CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL WARFARE by Seymour M. Hersh

CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL WARFARE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is the second book (The Silent Weapons--p. 220, 1968) to appear in as many months about the new warfare mankind, and in particular the United States, seems diabolically bent on improving. The question may well turn from the moral conjectures of overkill to the more practical problem of control. For one thing, where does one drop a test plague? This book deals more particularly with America's policies and program which Mr. Hersh also views as immoral, not to mention irresponsible, with haphazard stockpiling of gallons of incredibly toxic gas, vast dangerous experimentation, etc. The author gives a history of the development of CBW, describes the variety of chemical and biological agents and their various effects, the extent of usage in Vietnam, and of the military bases, commercial corporations and universities devoted to this research. One fatal irony is that despite the amount of money and energy the government is expending in this area, it could only come up with say, enough civilian gas masks to protect one man in 10,000 in a national emergency. More so than the earlier book, this hits where it may very well hurt, close to home. For anyone with any sense of moral or social concern.

Pub Date: June 1st, 1968
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill