A lighthearted frolic ready for a rousing singalong

SHARON, LOIS AND BRAM'S SKINNAMARINK

A beloved children’s song is expanded for a new generation.

Sharon, Lois, and Bram, a folk trio from Toronto, began singing “Skinnamarink” in 1978. They didn’t write the song, but it gained fame thanks to their popular Canadian TV show, The Elephant Show. With three new verses written by Sharon’s daughter, Randi, this catchy ditty is re-imagined for a new audience of youngsters. Beginning with the classic lines “I love you in the morning, / and in the afternoon. // I love you in the evening, / underneath the moon,” young tots are encouraged to find and share love at all times of the day. The new verses expand to cover emotions (“I love you when you’re happy, / and when you’re feeling blue”), geography (“I love you in the Arctic, the desert, by the sea”) and seasons (“I love you in the summer, / the fall and winter too”). The landscape orientation showcases the growing crowd that joins in to sing during the chorus, which turns into a full-fledged happy throng of many races, ethnicities, abilities, ages, and even species (fans of Sharon, Lois, and Bram will delight in the large pachyderm included). The smooth timing of the page turns lends the book beautifully to reading—or, of course, singing—aloud, but the relatively small figures and busy compositions mean it will be best enjoyed up close or in a lap.

A lighthearted frolic ready for a rousing singalong . (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 3, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-7352-6406-9

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Tundra Books

Review Posted Online: May 22, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Preachy and predictable.

RUBYLICIOUS

From the Pinkalicious series

Pinkalicious is excited to add the 100th rock to her rock collection.

Her brother, Peter, is not impressed. He thinks the rock looks dirty and that it isn’t special at all. When the siblings try to rub the rock clean, though, something wonderful happens: A magical figure emerges in a cloud of red smoke. Rather than ask her name, Pinkalicious and Peter tell her they will call her Rocky. Rocky accepts the new name and nervously says that she can grant the children a wish. But every time the sister and brother make a wish, Rocky initially grants it and then talks them out of it. When Peter and Pinkalicious wish for a gigantic mountain of sweets, for instance, a timorous Rocky shows them how eating so much sugar harms their bodies. When the children wish that they could fly, Rocky shows them how dangerous flying can be. When they wish to live in a castle, Rocky gives them a palace that is too large and cold to be any fun. In the end, Pinkalicious and Peter decide that the best wish they can make isn’t for themselves but for Rocky—a decision that leads to even more magical results. This latest series installment underwhelms. In addition to the arbitrary plot and wooden dialogue, Pinkalicious and Peter come across as maddeningly entitled. (This book was reviewed digitally.)

Preachy and predictable. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 28, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-06-305521-6

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Aug. 18, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2021

Did you like this book?

Extremely simple and rather sweet.

BULLDOZER'S CHRISTMAS DIG

From the Bulldozer series

Bulldozer is worried about what to give his friends for Christmas.

On Christmas Eve, Dump Truck is carrying, Digger Truck is stringing, and Crane Truck is lifting—all in service of decorating for Christmas. But Bulldozer is on the side, surrounded by cats, worrying. He has not a single gift for his friends. What can he do? He sees a tire half buried in the snow and wonders what other treasures might be there. He starts to dig, and he hits something…but it turns out to be junk. He keeps on digging and finds something else: “more junk.” He keeps digging and digging. The piles grow larger, the sky gets darker, and Bulldozer’s hope fades. But then he thinks he sees something through the snow. He pokes the pile of junk this way and that. He adds bits and pieces. As his friends call out to him that it’s quitting time, Bulldozer puts last touches on his gift. He moves aside to reveal his creation to his friends, and all are pleased with the gift. The little yellow Bulldozer with his entourage of animal friends is a likable character whose plight children will relate to and whose noncommercial solution is a model for creative youngsters to take as inspiration. Best for wrapping a message of giving within a truck-loving package full of sound effects. (This book was reviewed digitally.)

Extremely simple and rather sweet. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 21, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-5344-3820-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Caitlyn Dlouhy/Atheneum

Review Posted Online: Aug. 18, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2021

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more