GIVE US A GREAT BIG SMILE, ROSY COLE by Sheila Greenwald

GIVE US A GREAT BIG SMILE, ROSY COLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

As the ten-year-old niece of a successful photographer, Rosy Cole is in trouble. When sister Anitra turned ten three years ago, Uncle Ralph did a book about her called Anitra Dances. When equestrian sister Pippa turned ten the next year, Uncle Ralph did a book called Pippa Prances. Now Uncle Ralph, broke again, has decided to do a book about Rosy's violin playing. A Very Little Fiddler will show her at lessons and culminate at a recital. Other girls suddenly declare themselves her ""best friend""; her violin teacher, who knows Rosy is no good, is nevertheless agog at the prospect of a book; and even Rosy herself, who knows it too, finds stardom going to her head. But then Rosy hears her awful playing on tape, realizes she can't go through with a recital, and puts her foot down. Aping the Juilliard students playing in Central Park for tuition money, Rosy sets up nearby with a petition and a sign: HELP ME I HAVE NO TALENT SHOULD NOT GET LESSONS RECITALS PUBLICITY OR ENCOURAGEMENT. Although Greenwald's obvious digs at a real-life photographer slightly diminish the story's good-natured humanity, Rosy wins our sympathy right off and keeps it throughout. And her anti-prodigy ploy caps the performance winningly.

Pub Date: April 30th, 1981
Publisher: Atlantic/Little, Brown