THE STORY OF MODERN ART by Sheldon Cheney

THE STORY OF MODERN ART

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The French Revolution gave an opportunity for a revolution in art, but the leader of his period, David, failed to seize the chance. Consequently, modern art has to come forward engram and Delacroix, and the Goya influence provide its footing. In England Turner, Constable, Blake heralded a new school. The thing that emerges most strikingly from this excellent survey of modern painting (there is nothing of the other branches of art, sculpture, architecture) to the preponderance of French artists in the century that followed, Manel, Monel, Cezanne, Renoir, Gauguin. And it was the Paris School that ourtured Fissero, Van Gogh, the whole impressionist group, the Primitives, the sub the Futurists, English names, Americans, a scattering of experimenters from Switzerland, the Netherlands, Italy; Vollard, the dealer who became patron of the new art. Ellis Faure and later in England Fry and Bell, and in America, Pach and Steigling, all fought for the rights of the modern groups. Germany, and the experimenters, the development of the abstract painting, Grosz and Beckmann too daring in their criticism to survive the new regime, Kathe Kollwitz the only radical the Nazis dared not liquidsts, and experimentation lying under the crooked cross. European art in decline; American art on the ascendant, still groping, but the Latin Americans, Rivera, Orozco, Merila, , making their great contribution. The Federal Art project gives art a new birth, and the foreign refugee artists have their chance along with our own Grant wood, Thomas Benton, Marsh, Hopper, Gropper, Carroll, Marin and others. Enough of brief biography and anecdote to give it vitality, but never losing sight of the wider scope of the study.

Publisher: Viking