A copy of Jones’ safety guide should have a place of honor in every vehicle and camping kit.

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First Aid, Survival, and CPR

HOME AND FIELD POCKET GUIDE

Clear, succinct information, sensible design, and strongly organized information combine to make this field guide an invaluable aid to travelers and outdoor recreationists.

In eight color-coded, tabbed sections on safety, CPR, medical emergencies, injuries, the environment, poison, disaster, and survival, Jones’ (ECG Notes: Interpretation and Management Guide, 2009, etc.) guide highlights the basics of medical assistance and preventative actions. These basics include resuscitation techniques for adults, children (including infants), and pets; signs and symptoms of ailments, ranging from appendicitis to broken bones to heart attacks; common varieties of insects in the United States and how their bites and stings can affect people; how to collect, filter, and treat water to make it safe to drink; and how to diagnose and provide treatment for chemical burns, among many other emergency techniques. The guide looks much like a reporter’s notebook, and it’s small enough to carry in one hand. Throughout, it presents its information in clear language, with copious warnings (“If the person is conscious but cannot talk and appears to be choking, CPR is not appropriate”) and contacts that cover an exhaustive number of emergency situations. The well-chosen physical design also includes waterproof pages that are easy to write on with markers, which will allow users to make notes and carry the guide into a variety of different environments. Jones arranges the text into easily digestible chunks, using colors, subheads, graphics, photos, and text boxes to organize and enliven it. Readers can quickly find topics of interest by searching through the tabbed sections or by using the index. Jones, a registered nurse and EMT, assembled this book with an eye toward providing readers with enough information to get a handle on tough situations until professionals can take over—and it meets this task with clarity and aplomb.

A copy of Jones’ safety guide should have a place of honor in every vehicle and camping kit.

Pub Date: Oct. 5, 2011

ISBN: 978-0-8036-2182-4

Page Count: 237

Publisher: F.A. Davis Company

Review Posted Online: Aug. 1, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2015

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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