IN THE BEGINNING: A New Interpretation of the Old Testament by Shirley Van Eyssen

IN THE BEGINNING: A New Interpretation of the Old Testament

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Another display item, ambitious and unsatisfying. These 64 pages do not, as the subtitle would suggest, contain a new version of the Old Testament but an idiosyncratic selection of its stories and major figures from Adam and the Creation to Jonah. Those included are dramatic heroes and incidents but the prose is often fiat and the treatment ranges from skimpy (Daniel) to distorting -- Jacob and Rachel without a whisper of Leah. The illustrations are an uneasy juxtaposition of four distinct styles, all highly mannered: one is vaguely oriental, another features soft geometric pastels, a third employs the clean lines and deep colors of Flemish 'primitives,' a fourth is heavily and crudely expressionistic. (There are. incidentally, many frontal nudes.) Uneven text, incompatible and uncongenial illustrations -- where only brilliance could overcome the inutility of the presentation.

Pub Date: Feb. 3rd, 1971
Publisher: Harlin-Quist--dist. by Watts