ARROWS AND SNAKESKINS by Sidney N. Riggs

ARROWS AND SNAKESKINS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

John Winthrop is captured by the Pequot Indians because of his resemblance to the deceased son of the chieftain. He is required to assume the warrior's role and becomes the son of Wegum, the Indian princess, and the brother of Nemud who idolizes him. Though he longs to escape and even makes one attempt, John is gradually assimilated into the tribe, soon winning the admiration of many of his fellow warriors. He absorbs the strange Indian of pride and revenge and becomes enmeshed in the struggles, petty jealousies and treacheries among the various tribes. His loyalties split, John convinces the governor of the Massa husetts Bay colony, who has led a successful attack against the Indians, to spare Wegum and Named. Despite his to the Indians, John eventually re-assumes his role as an Englishman and recognizes that he must part with his adopted family. There is much intrigue in a which makes use of authentic Indian dialects as well as accurate history. It requires close reading and frequent use of the handy glossary to keep everything straight.

Publisher: Lippincott