THE KREMLIN AND THE EMBASSY by Sir William Hayter

THE KREMLIN AND THE EMBASSY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

It is evident from Sir William Hayter's memoir encompassing two sojourns in Moscow that he is a gentleman of charm and tact rather than prescience. He is willing to let one know his first impression of Khrushchev, later revised, and that Malenkov's resignation, after a show of intimacy between him and Mr. K., came as a surprise. Sir William came to Moscow first as a Third Secretary in the 1930's, returned in the 1950's as Ambassador, was able ""by a series of lucky chances, to see more of Russia's rulers than perhaps any British Ambassador since Lord Malmesbury became the confidante of Catherine the Great."" But ""each of the Soviet leaders carried his own private Iron Curtain around with him,"" and despite diplomatic encounters, they remained at a remove. Sir William seems more at ease recounting his travels, particularly in the Caucasus. His tenure extended through Hungary and Suoz; he returned to England in 1957, left the Foreign Office eighteen months later (with the Suez position, distasteful to him, still in mind) for the Wardenship of New College, Oxford. His dispatch is a minor pleasure rather than an essential.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1967
Publisher: Macmillan