SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"An important, thoughtfully balanced book aimed at shifting thinking and providing concrete steps toward encouraging positive—and realistic—self-image development."
Reflections on the benefits of giving children the chance to experience failure—and how to go about doing it. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Given the competing noise about parenting, this book should be required reading for parents."
A guide to stopping the helicoptering, lawn-mowing, and overindulging that can lead to entitled, self-centered thinking in children. Read full book review >

COLLABORATIVE INTELLIGENCE by Dawna Markova
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Provocative but open to the charge of one-sided overcorrection."
Consultant Markova (Wide Open: On Living with Purpose and Passion, 2008, etc.) and co-author McArthur argue that current thinking about leadership methods must change in the coming century.Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"As laws and mores continue to change at a rapid pace, this engaging study offers helpful historical and legal explanations."
This follow-up to lawyer Berkowitz's Sex and Punishment: Four Thousand Years of Judging Desire (2012) brings Western society's continued attempt at regulating sexual mores to the present.Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"A hackle-raising book about nature and human nature, venality and justice, and how disasters—before, during, and after—sharply mirror society."
How the most significant deleterious factor in natural disasters may be the human element. Read full book review >

THE HAUNTING OF THE MEXICAN BORDER by Kathryn Ferguson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 15, 2015

"A wise and humane account that draws on a lifetime of exploring the border country and pondering its meaning."
A memoir that grapples with life, death, and documentary filmmaking on the United States-Mexico border. Read full book review >
MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED by Tony Wagner
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"Of some interest to curriculum-reform advocates and policy planners but without the fire and grace of Ivan Illich, Neil Postman, and others."
Public education is underfunded and undervalued. An education expert and a venture capitalist look to improve the situation. Read full book review >
HOW WE LIVE NOW by Bella DePaulo
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"An informative and inspirational guide to the myriad ways of making a home."
An eye-opening survey of the different living arrangements Americans have come to embrace. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"The fight on behalf of household workers for the '3 P's: pay, protection, and professionalism' continues. Look to Nadasen's history for an understanding of how the struggle began."
Scholar/activist Nadasen (History/Barnard Coll.; Rethinking the Welfare Rights Movement, 2011, etc.) showcases the stories of African-American women who helped organize domestic workers from the 1950s through the 1970s.Read full book review >
NO HOUSE TO CALL MY HOME by Ryan Berg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Particularly important for caseworkers and social service specialists, who, by Berg's account, are likely to encounter more young people in the LGBTQ population in the near future."
Just as there is a school-to-prison pipeline in this country, so too, this grim report reveals, is there a home-to-homeless paradigm for many young people. Read full book review >
THE MAKING OF ASIAN AMERICA by Erika Lee
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A powerful, timely story told with method and dignity."
A sweeping study of the fastest growing group in the United States that underscores the shameful racist regard white Americans have long held for Asian immigrants. Read full book review >
THE ISRAELI MIND by Alon Gratch
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A solid overview of how psychology, rather than violence, might provide the way to peace."
An attempt "to forge a comprehensive, provocative, and accessible narrative about the Israeli mind." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sabaa Tahir
August 4, 2015

Sabaa Tahir’s novel An Ember in the Ashes reveals a world inspired by ancient Rome and defined by brutality. Seventeen-year-old Laia has grown up with one rule for survival: Never challenge the Empire. But when Laia’s brother Darin is arrested for treason, she leaves behind everything she knows, risking her life to try and save him. She enlists help from the rebels whose extensive underground network may lead to Darin. Their help comes with a price, though. Laia must infiltrate the Empire’s greatest military academy as a spy. Elias is the Empire’s finest soldier—and its most unwilling one. Thrown together by chance and united by their hatred of the Empire, Laia and Elias will soon discover that their fates are intertwined—and that their choices may change the destiny of the entire Empire. We talk to An Ember in the Ashes author Sabaa Tahir this week on Kirkus TV. View video >