THE GIRL AT THE BAGGAGE CLAIM by Gish Jen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"While Jen's findings are undoubtedly intriguing, she is not fully convincing in her portrayal of the modest, hardworking flexi-self and the big pit self 'with high self-esteem and a lack of stick-to-it-ness.'"
A Chinese-American novelist and essayist investigates how culture shapes identity. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"A sharp analysis of an increasingly pressing problem, but Nichols falls short of proposing a satisfying solution."
Some fresh twists on a familiar theme: the dumbing down of America amid the defiant distrust of expertise. Read full book review >

A GENERATION OF SOCIOPATHS by Bruce Cannon Gibney
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"'This is a deeply negative portrayal, but a certain negativity may be what's required.' Maybe so, but if this polemic makes wounded millennials feel better, it likely won't reach older ears, who may be more sympathetic than Gibney imagines."
A cri de coeur against baby boomers, who "unraveled the social fabric woven by previous generations in the interests of sheer selfishness." Read full book review >
THE UNMADE BED by Stephen Marche
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Satisfying food for thought on the ever changing dynamics of men and women as they interact and go about their individual lives."
Examination of the new roles women and men are playing in the home and the workplace. Read full book review >
HOW TO KILL A CITY by Peter Moskowitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A harsh critic of the forces changing urban life paints a vivid and grim picture of the future of American cities."
A freelance journalist reveals the many evils of gentrification. Read full book review >

TROUBLEMAKERS by Carla Shalaby
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 7, 2017

"A provocative study questions the value and/or harm of conformity in a school setting."
A close look at four young "troubled" kids in school. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 7, 2017

"Sunny, easy-to-follow self-help principles."
A series of practical steps for women to self-improve and help each other. Read full book review >
WISH LANTERNS by Alec Ash
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Sensitive, fascinating reports."
Novelistic anecdotes reveal Chinese young people struggling with universal themes of education, employment, and love. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"The book will have some appeal for certain sectors of the sociology community, but it is likely too narrowly focused to reach a wider audience."
New York-born, Toronto-based writer Bovy debuts with an exploration of how the idea of "privilege" has morphed over the years and now "plays an enormous role in the online shaming culture." Read full book review >
THE CREATIVE SPARK by Agustín Fuentes
HISTORY
Released: March 14, 2017

"Though the science can get a little lite, this offers an informative, readable introduction to recent scholarship on the anthropology of creativity."
An anthropologist ponders the better angels of our nature—the ones armed with paintbrushes, notebooks, cameras, and plowshares. Read full book review >
TEETH by Mary Otto
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A focused, well-researched depiction of the dental industry's social and cultural relevance and its dire need for reform."
An astute examination of the complex, insular business of oral health care. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A strong case that deserves a wider readership than just policy wonks."
An examination of economic inequality—unsurprisingly, the title refers to race as well as economic class. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >