SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"A highly thoughtful and entertaining treatment of a subject that merits serious consideration."
An internationally recognized leader in the field of childhood learning debunks the concept of "good parenting." Read full book review >
INVISIBLE MAN, GOT THE WHOLE WORLD WATCHING by Mychal Denzel Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Realizing that he has more questions than answers, Smith cautiously sketches a useful blueprint for radical and intersectional politics in a country where a black child can grow up to be president but where living while black is still dangerous."
As black men are cut down by the police and self-appointed vigilantes, an activist wrestles with competing claims—from his family and community, his historically black university, the media, and white America—on his blackness and how it is to be lived. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 12, 2016

"A lengthy manifesto for AMCAP that lays out a vision for an ascendant black America."
Rempson (Minority Access to Higher Education In N.Y. City, 1972) examines what he sees as the root causes of education and economic-mobility gaps that affect African-American males.Read full book review >
POLARIZED by James E. Campbell
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"A painstakingly methodical, exhausting process to conclude that there is really nothing to worry about."
A study of an American public grown more ideologically conflicted since the 1960s and why—or whether—it matters. Read full book review >
A BOOK ABOUT LOVE by Jonah Lehrer
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 12, 2016

"While the book adequately covers a good deal of research and systematically examines the rewards and challenges of intimacy, it doesn't make love sound like a whole lot of fun."
Journalist Lehrer addresses the power of human attachment. Read full book review >

Tao of Sustainability by Gregory Ripley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"An informative, well-presented application of traditional activities and philosophies to modern-day life."
Ripley (Primal Energy, 2014, etc.) offers a path back to nature in this philosophical work.Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 5, 2016

"A culturally rich and rewarding personal chronicle of ethnic faith and intermingled tradition."
A heartfelt memoir plumbs the multilayered experience of being Muslim in America. Read full book review >
THE FIRE THIS TIME by Jesmyn Ward
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Timely contributions to an urgent national conversation."
Poets, scholars, and essayists reflect on race in America. Read full book review >
THIS IS WHERE YOU BELONG by Melody Warnick
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 21, 2016

"Well intended but unsatisfying."
Don't like where you live? Socialize. Volunteer. Make lists. Or you could just move. Read full book review >
THE GREAT ACCELERATION by Robert Colvile
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2016

"A familiar argument but with interesting twists and a rosier forecast than many other books of social/technological criticism."
A well-paced consideration of the effects of technology on lives made ever busier by it—and whipping by in a whirlwind as a result. Read full book review >
SHIFTING SANDS by Raja Shahadeh
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 29, 2016

"An accessible collection in which the editors and the contributors don't shirk from delivering necessary criticism but offer possibilities of hope for a troubled region."
This compilation by diverse writers lends nuanced insight into the complicated, volatile Middle East. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 5, 2016

"Not the how-to book that its title suggests but Fish presents a compelling argument about the necessity of argument."
The acclaimed literary theorist and law professor addresses the concept of argument. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >