Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 2)

THE NEW ARAB WARS by Marc Lynch
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 26, 2016

"An excellent, clear distillation of recent events in the Middle East."
A keen observer of the violent upheaval in the Middle East since the Arab Spring makes a strong assertion: there is no returning to the old autocratic ways. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 26, 2016

"Well written and full of firsthand insight—a good companion to weightier studies such as Timothy Miller's The 60s Communes (1999) and Arthur Kopecky's Leaving New Buffalo Commune (2006)."
If you can remember the '60s, you may have been there—but as a very young person, as this thoughtful history reveals. Read full book review >

THE GUNNING OF AMERICA by Pamela Haag
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"A refreshingly unusual approach by an author admirably transparent about why she wrote the book and why she chose to avoid more traditional approaches."
An examination of the controversial realm of American gun culture through the perspective of gun manufacturers, with an emphasis on the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. Read full book review >
GHETTO by Mitchell Duneier
HISTORY
Released: April 19, 2016

"Americans did not create the ghetto, but in this well-documented study, we see clearly how those urban areas have come to embody so many of our shortcomings when it comes to matters of race."
How communities—especially in the United States—created, ostracized, and condemned the idea and reality of the ghetto. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 19, 2016

"An important account of medicine's role in a world in crisis."
A behind-the-scenes look at the nascent field of humanitarian medicine as it has evolved in recent years of civil wars, famines, tsunamis, and other natural and man-made disasters. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: April 12, 2016

"Racism is the enduring scar on the American consciousness. In this ambitious, magisterial book, Kendi reveals just how deep that scar cuts and why it endures, its barely subcutaneous pain still able to flare."
An accomplished history of racist thought and practice in the United States from the Puritans to the present. Read full book review >
BECOMING GRANDMA by Lesley Stahl
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2016

"A welcome guide for new grandparents and their children looking to savor the joys and navigate the pitfalls of grandparenting."
Award-winning broadcast journalist Stahl (Reporting Live, 1999) shares the joys of being a grandmother.Read full book review >
I WANT MY EPIDURAL BACK by Karen Alpert
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2016

"Crass, rarely entertaining comedy that pokes fun at motherhood."
More parenting humor from the author of I Heart My Little A-Holes (2013).Read full book review >
DOOR TO DOOR by Edward Humes
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 12, 2016

"A revealing look at the reality and impact of our 'buy-it-now, same-day-delivery, traffic-packed world.'"
The story of the massive, complex global system that transports people and things from door to door, day and night. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2016

"Good advice backed by research coupled with personal reflections by a father on how to let children grow up to be individuals rather than miniature versions of their parents."
A man opens up about his shortcomings as a father. Read full book review >
THE FIGHT FOR FIFTEEN by David Rolf
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A savvy inside look at the social movement challenging decades of stark economic decline."
An expert exploration of a provocative blueprint for rescuing the American middle class through the creation of a new living wage. Read full book review >
THE GOLDEN CONDOM by Jeanne Safer
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 5, 2016

"A highly relatable collection of anecdotes that serves as a valuable crash course on the pitfalls, seductions, and rewards of love."
A psychoanalyst dissects the raptures and torments of love through a series of case studies. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >