Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 2)

LISTEN TO YOUR MOTHER by Ann Imig
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 7, 2015

"The essays are short, which enables the book to cover a lot of ground, but they also pack a strong emotional punch—and they're almost certain to leave any mother feeling less alone."
A collection of personal essays about the importance of connecting mothers to each other for support. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 7, 2015

"A cautionary, timely gay rights manifesto with teeth."
The noted outspoken gay journalist and radio host passionately appeals to the gay community to resist complacency in the struggle for equality. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 1, 2015

"Occasionally ponderous and strident, Crawford's argument is both timely and passionate."
A philosopher mounts a polemic against self-absorption, subjectivism and conformity. Read full book review >
SELFISH, SHALLOW, AND SELF-ABSORBED by Meghan Daum
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 1, 2015

"A courageous defense of childlessness and a necessary corrective to the Cult of Mommy, but Daum's collection could have benefitted from a more diverse pool of contributors and a fuller consideration of contrary opinions."
Daum (The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion, 2014, etc.) compiles essays from a group of noted writers—including Kate Christensen, Geoff Dyer and Lionel Shriver—holding forth on the topic of deliberate childlessness.Read full book review >
WHITE BACKLASH by Marisa Abrajano
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 2015

"The authors ponderously demonstrate that white voters who oppose unrestricted Latino immigration increasingly support the party that shares their concern and resists paying for social services for undocumented immigrants. Not worth the effort."
Two University of California, San Diego, political science professors set out to conclusively establish the obvious. Read full book review >

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 1, 2015

"Not all the speeches break new ground, but they are uplifting in their overarching focus: There is important work to be done in this world, regardless of the large and small events of our lives."
A collection of recent graduation speeches meant to inspire, edited by New Press education editor Grove and recent Harvard grad Ostrer. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2015

"To be read as both corrective and supplement to Foucault, Szasz, and Rieff. Often brilliant and always luminous and rewarding."
Far-ranging, illuminating study of minds gone awry across space and time. Read full book review >
SO YOU'VE BEEN PUBLICLY SHAMED by Jon Ronson
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 31, 2015

"Another intriguing journey from Ronson, who notes that our social media dark side grows ever darker when we believe we're superior to others—and anonymous."
The author of works about everyday psychopathologies takes a hard look at the dark side of shaming on social media. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 24, 2015

"An impressive debut offering explanations based on coherence between people, cases and the events they adjudicated."
Center for American Progress senior constitutional policy analyst Millhiser assesses the damage caused by the Supreme Court to the Constitution, government and the citizens whose rights have repeatedly been curtailed or abrogated in arbitrary, capricious, bigoted and arrogant proceedings. Read full book review >
THE WILD OATS PROJECT by Robin Rinaldi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 17, 2015

"A sensitive, intimate and bold story."
A 40-something journalist's account of her yearlong open-marriage experiment and its consequences. Read full book review >
BETTER THAN BEFORE by Gretchen Rubin
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 17, 2015

"The airy, conversational writing style makes this a quick but not terribly substantial read."
A slight twist on the happiness message that made Rubin (Happier at Home: Kiss More, Jump More, Abandon a Project, Read Samuel Johnson, and My Other Experiments in the Practice of Everyday Life, 2009, etc.) famous, with few new insights.Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 17, 2015

"Bond renders a worthwhile subject into entertaining, informative reading."
London-based writer Bond wades into the murky reaches of the human psyche in this exploration of how other people's opinions shape our behaviors and attitudes. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >