Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 2)

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"An important, thoughtfully balanced book aimed at shifting thinking and providing concrete steps toward encouraging positive—and realistic—self-image development."
Reflections on the benefits of giving children the chance to experience failure—and how to go about doing it. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Given the competing noise about parenting, this book should be required reading for parents."
A guide to stopping the helicoptering, lawn-mowing, and overindulging that can lead to entitled, self-centered thinking in children. Read full book review >

TRIUMPH OF THE HEART by Megan Feldman Bettencourt
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Bettencourt takes a broad view of opportunities small and large for forgiveness, and in doing so, she provides hope for a way forward that focuses more on acceptance than retribution."
One writer's journey through learning about the many forms forgiveness can take. Read full book review >
COLLABORATIVE INTELLIGENCE by Dawna Markova
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Provocative but open to the charge of one-sided overcorrection."
Consultant Markova (Wide Open: On Living with Purpose and Passion, 2008, etc.) and co-author McArthur argue that current thinking about leadership methods must change in the coming century.Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"As laws and mores continue to change at a rapid pace, this engaging study offers helpful historical and legal explanations."
This follow-up to lawyer Berkowitz's Sex and Punishment: Four Thousand Years of Judging Desire (2012) brings Western society's continued attempt at regulating sexual mores to the present.Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"A hackle-raising book about nature and human nature, venality and justice, and how disasters—before, during, and after—sharply mirror society."
How the most significant deleterious factor in natural disasters may be the human element. Read full book review >
GIVE US THE BALLOT by Ari Berman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Not just a compelling history, but a cry for help in the recurring struggle to gain what is supposed to be an inalienable right."
An incisive look at the many issues surrounding the right to vote. Read full book review >
WE BELIEVE THE CHILDREN by Richard Beck
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"An intriguing but uneven treatment of a subject that has not received much attention in years."
An attempt to explain the hysteria that surrounded the child sex abuse cases that swept the United States in the 1980s. Read full book review >
DOING GOOD BETTER by William MacAskill
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Highly useful guidelines to finding the perfect charity worthy of your money."
How to determine which charities are the best to support. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"The authors' suggestions and insights cover a wide spectrum of child-raising situations and should, when properly applied, deliver lasting results."
If it works for successful entrepreneurs, why shouldn't it work for your children? Read full book review >
DEER ISLAND by Neil Ansell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Stark but lucid, with moments of genuine poetry."
A former British charity worker tells the quietly lyrical story of a peripatetic young adulthood. Read full book review >
THE BORN FREES by Kimberly Burge
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 3, 2015

"An affecting portrait of post-apartheid South Africa, particularly useful for writing instructors serving at-risk constituencies."
Journalist Burge recounts a sojourn in a township outside Cape Town working with a writing group called Amazw'Entombi, or "Voices of the Girls."Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >