Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 2)

THE MOTHER OF ALL QUESTIONS by Rebecca Solnit
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"As always, Solnit is eloquent and sharply insightful."
A distinguished cultural critic tackles "the binaries and boundaries of gender" while examining the continuing evolution of feminism. Read full book review >
HOW TO KILL A CITY by Peter Moskowitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A harsh critic of the forces changing urban life paints a vivid and grim picture of the future of American cities."
A freelance journalist reveals the many evils of gentrification. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 7, 2017

"Sunny, easy-to-follow self-help principles."
A series of practical steps for women to self-improve and help each other. Read full book review >
WISH LANTERNS by Alec Ash
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Sensitive, fascinating reports."
Novelistic anecdotes reveal Chinese young people struggling with universal themes of education, employment, and love. Read full book review >
A GENERATION OF SOCIOPATHS by Bruce Cannon Gibney
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"'This is a deeply negative portrayal, but a certain negativity may be what's required.' Maybe so, but if this polemic makes wounded millennials feel better, it likely won't reach older ears, who may be more sympathetic than Gibney imagines."
A cri de coeur against baby boomers, who "unraveled the social fabric woven by previous generations in the interests of sheer selfishness." Read full book review >

THE UNMADE BED by Stephen Marche
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Satisfying food for thought on the ever changing dynamics of men and women as they interact and go about their individual lives."
Examination of the new roles women and men are playing in the home and the workplace. Read full book review >
TROUBLEMAKERS by Carla Shalaby
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 7, 2017

"A provocative study questions the value and/or harm of conformity in a school setting."
A close look at four young "troubled" kids in school. Read full book review >
THE GIRL AT THE BAGGAGE CLAIM by Gish Jen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"While Jen's findings are undoubtedly intriguing, she is not fully convincing in her portrayal of the modest, hardworking flexi-self and the big pit self 'with high self-esteem and a lack of stick-to-it-ness.'"
A Chinese-American novelist and essayist investigates how culture shapes identity. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"A sharp analysis of an increasingly pressing problem, but Nichols falls short of proposing a satisfying solution."
Some fresh twists on a familiar theme: the dumbing down of America amid the defiant distrust of expertise. Read full book review >
THE COMPLACENT CLASS by Tyler Cowen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A book that will undoubtedly stir discussion—as many of Cowen's books do—with readers divided about how they stand based on where they currently sit."
An influential economist seeks to persuade readers that American citizens have gotten overly complacent, that a crisis point is near, and that a widespread rebellion may alter the existing order. Read full book review >
FAST-FOOD KIDS by Amy L. Best
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"The book may be useful for sociology teachers and students, but general readers and policymakers will find this tough to digest."
A cultural analysis of what kids eat and why. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"There are countless kernels of amazing achievement and courage throughout this jam-packed, engaging history."
A history of the federal push to bolster women's rights from successive presidents since John F. Kennedy—and the resulting clashes with traditional conservative constituencies. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >