Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 2)

NAVIGATING LIFE by Margaux Bergen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Bergen's more helpful suggestions about ways to live well would be better suited to a mother-to-daughter letter, with all of the straining to impress shorn away."
A guide to life started by a mother when her daughter was in elementary school and given to her on her first day of college. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Timely, controversial, and bound to stir already heated discussion."
An impassioned analysis of headline-making cases of police shootings and other acts of "state violence" against blacks and other minorities. Read full book review >

POLARIZED by James E. Campbell
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"A painstakingly methodical, exhausting process to conclude that there is really nothing to worry about."
A study of an American public grown more ideologically conflicted since the 1960s and why—or whether—it matters. Read full book review >
SHIFTING SANDS by Raja Shahadeh
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 29, 2016

"An accessible collection in which the editors and the contributors don't shirk from delivering necessary criticism but offer possibilities of hope for a troubled region."
This compilation by diverse writers lends nuanced insight into the complicated, volatile Middle East. Read full book review >
The Essence of Ethical Pragmatism by E. Dennis Brod
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: July 28, 2016

"Impressively free of political bias, but philosophically slight."
An updated version of philosophical pragmatism, offered as a cure for all that ails the world. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 22, 2016

"An elucidating, nuanced study of gender and feminist dynamics perfect for our current political moment."
A timely study of gender and media that reaches back before the present American election to earlier delineations of white manhood and presidential power. Read full book review >
THE END OF WHITE CHRISTIAN AMERICA by Robert P. Jones
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 12, 2016

"A missed opportunity to explore an important cultural change in the making."
A pundit considers the decline of Christian religious influence on American politics and culture. Read full book review >
A BOOK ABOUT LOVE by Jonah Lehrer
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 12, 2016

"While the book adequately covers a good deal of research and systematically examines the rewards and challenges of intimacy, it doesn't make love sound like a whole lot of fun."
Journalist Lehrer addresses the power of human attachment. Read full book review >
THE VOYEUR'S MOTEL by Gay Talese
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 12, 2016

"Undoubtedly creepy and unnerving but also an entirely compelling slice of seamy American life."
The disturbing private world of the sleaziest motel manager since Norman Bates. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 5, 2016

"Not the how-to book that its title suggests but Fish presents a compelling argument about the necessity of argument."
The acclaimed literary theorist and law professor addresses the concept of argument. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 5, 2016

"A culturally rich and rewarding personal chronicle of ethnic faith and intermingled tradition."
A heartfelt memoir plumbs the multilayered experience of being Muslim in America. Read full book review >
UNLATCHED by Jennifer Grayson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 5, 2016

"Persuasive arguments backed by scientific research that clearly demonstrate the benefits of breast-feeding for as long as possible."
A new analysis of the controversy surrounding women breast-feeding their children. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >