Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 2)

FREE SPEECH by Timothy Garton Ash
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 24, 2016

"A thorough and well-argued contribution to the quest for global free speech norms."
A field guide to the challenges of setting standards for free speech in a "cosmopolis" of diverse cultures. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: May 17, 2016

"An intellectual and provocative perspective challenging Christians and others to reconsider the confines of spiritual interconnection, harmony, and progressive inclusion in modern religion."
In the latest installment of the publisher's enterprising Queer Action/Queer Ideas series, queer Episcopal priest and political strategist Edman brings a fresh approach to the ongoing conundrum between the LGBTQ community and Christianity. Read full book review >

THE BOYS IN THE BUNKHOUSE by Dan Barry
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Gently, empathetically, and indelibly, Barry conveys a tale of unthinkable brutality."
A gripping indictment of society's treatment of "losers." Read full book review >
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE by Tom Vanderbilt
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 10, 2016

"Like it or not, there's much to behold in this exhaustively researched, intellectual assessment of human preference."
The science behind the choices we make. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 10, 2016

"Provocative, timely, and immensely rewarding reading."
The story of one of the longest-lasting negative metaphors in America politics: the limousine liberal. Read full book review >

Vets For Vets by Gerald Alpern
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 5, 2016

"A compassionate and eye-opening approach to healing mentally and emotionally wounded soldiers."
A revolutionary look at methods to treat veterans in distress. Read full book review >
HOMINTERN by Gregory Woods
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 3, 2016

"An information-heavy book that provides a wonderful resource for those interested in learning about the rise of gay poetics at the onset of the 20th century."
A comprehensive anthropological survey exploring the ways in which the gay community has changed the world. Read full book review >
THE FIRST 1,000 DAYS by Roger Thurow
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 3, 2016

"In-depth research and personal stories bring the issue of malnutrition in women and children to the forefront and provide evidence that, with proper support, children can flourish."
A presentation of research from around the world showing that good nutrition is critical in the first 1,000 days of a child's life. Read full book review >
VISUAL INTELLIGENCE by Amy E. Herman
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 3, 2016

"Sharp and original, this book should alter how readers look at the world."
A comprehensive guide to seeing what others do not, distilled from art historian Herman's acclaimed seminar The Art of Perception. Read full book review >
ONEIDA by Ellen Wayland-Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A smartly contextualized tale of 'the tension between radical social critique and unapologetic accommodation...between communal harmony and individual striving.'"
A study of the unlikely origins of one of America's most recognizable brands. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2016

"A comprehensive analysis that lays the foundation for a discussion of necessary reforms and how they can be achieved."
Why the theories used to rationalize our beliefs in democracy are broken beyond repair and must be replaced. Read full book review >
ONE by Edward Mapplethorpe
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: May 1, 2016

"A wonderful portfolio of little monsters—or little angels, as you prefer."
A noted photographer turns from his previous interest in abstract portraiture to immediate, evocative studies of infants in their splendid innocence. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >