Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 2)

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An entertaining, informative guidebook to some cool places populated by people to whom attention should be paid."
A tour of the territories of the United States, "those scattered shards of earth and populace that make up our outposts far from the North American continent." Read full book review >
FAST-FOOD KIDS by Amy L. Best
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"The book may be useful for sociology teachers and students, but general readers and policymakers will find this tough to digest."
A cultural analysis of what kids eat and why. Read full book review >

THE UNBANKING OF AMERICA by Lisa Servon
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Servon's approachable if somewhat academic study is an indictment of a financial structure bent on large returns at the expense of all else, but it also offers hope for ways around that ravenous system."
Banks seldom have much green money these days—and not many customers, either. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"There are countless kernels of amazing achievement and courage throughout this jam-packed, engaging history."
A history of the federal push to bolster women's rights from successive presidents since John F. Kennedy—and the resulting clashes with traditional conservative constituencies. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Though the story suffers somewhat in the telling, Starr is proud of his accomplishments, and he deserves to be."
One man's amazing accomplishment in founding a school amid a series of daunting challenges. Read full book review >

LOCKED IN by John Pfaff
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A thorough and demanding examination of a problem that has no easy solutions and a challenge to policymakers to discard prior notions about the nature of the problem and the needed reforms."
Why the United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world and what can be done to address the problem. Read full book review >
THE COMPLACENT CLASS by Tyler Cowen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A book that will undoubtedly stir discussion—as many of Cowen's books do—with readers divided about how they stand based on where they currently sit."
An influential economist seeks to persuade readers that American citizens have gotten overly complacent, that a crisis point is near, and that a widespread rebellion may alter the existing order. Read full book review >
LONG SHOT by Craig Hodges
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A skillfully told, affecting memoir of sports and social activism."
A former professional basketball player looks back on his life on and off the court, with an emphasis on how his outspokenness regarding racial discrimination led to his unofficial banishment from the NBA. Read full book review >
RISE by Cara Brookins
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Not without its flaws but an inspiring memoir of absolute determination."
A memoir of a mother and her children building a house—and security—from the ground up. Read full book review >
OTHER PEOPLE by David Shields
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Uneven but mostly sharp and appealing."
An assortment of musings, cultural critiques, and memoir. Read full book review >
TESTOSTERONE REX by Cordelia Fine
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A fascinating, greatly contemplative discussion of sex and gender and the embedded societal expectations of both."
A cerebral assessment of gender, society, and sexuality. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Accessible, highly effective methods for raising well-behaved children."
Advice for parents on handling toddlers to pre-tweens. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >