Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 2)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A delightfully witty, enjoyable read."
A Brit living in the United States exposes the dark side of the happiness business in her adopted country. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"In what is a growing genre, Aiken provides a thoughtful approach to the attractions, distractions, and pitfalls of our digital culture."
An expert in the field of cyberpsychology looks at how the interface between digital technology and our daily activities impacts social and personal relationships. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"An intelligent, rigorous manifesto that could use more direction for action."
An impassioned social and political critique with glimmers of hope for change. Read full book review >
CAST AWAY by Charlotte McDonald-Gibson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A powerfully written, well-documented account of a humanitarian crisis of epic proportions."
Giving faces to the headline stories about the flood of immigrants seeking asylum in Europe. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A comprehensive primer for how to contemplate urban spaces as they evolve for the future."
A creative city planner takes inspiration from the ancients' sense of urban integrity to propound a holistic approach to crafting the city space. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 11, 2016

"Repetitive, somewhat circular pleading weakens the case, but Singh's thesis merits discussion for anyone interested in curing a sick health care system."
A well-intended but imperfectly constructed argument for community-based health care by a physician-turned-medical activist. Read full book review >
THE KINGDOM OF SPEECH by Tom Wolfe
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 30, 2016

"Typically, Wolfe throws a Molotov cocktail at conventional wisdom in a book that won't settle any argument but is sure to start some."
A fresh look at an old controversy, as a master provocateur suggests that human language renders the theory of evolution more like a fable than scientific fact. Read full book review >
SUBSTITUTE by Nicholson Baker
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An affecting (long-exposure) snapshot revealing real-life concerns."
The eminent Maine-based author chronicles his lively, maddening month substitute teaching in the local public schools. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An intriguing assessment of the effectiveness of a variety of global parenting customs."
A close examination of parenting practices across the globe. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 19, 2016

"A concise, informative look at the problem of obesity and the factors that make it a rapidly growing epidemic."
A short debut guide presents the common causes, complications, and cultural norms surrounding weight issues. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Dec. 12, 2015

"A fervent warning about environmental dangers accompanied by a thorough list of resources."
A comprehensive collection of information about nanoparticles and their impact on the environment. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Timely, controversial, and bound to stir already heated discussion."
An impassioned analysis of headline-making cases of police shootings and other acts of "state violence" against blacks and other minorities. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >