Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 3)

ONLY ONE THING CAN SAVE US by Thomas Geoghegan
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 19, 2014

"A manifesto that provokes even when it doesn't convince and tempers its broadsides with humor and a conversational style."
A union lawyer offers radical prescriptions to resuscitate a moribund labor movement. Read full book review >
THEY EAT HORSES, DON'T THEY? by Piu Marie Eatwell
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"Entertaining mini-essays that debunk common idealized conceptions of the French."
In this debut, Eatwell pulls back the veil on France and French culture, exposing the truth behind 45 myths that have swirled around the French for ages. Read full book review >

CAUGHT by Marie Gottschalk
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 7, 2014

"A needed cry for justice, though perhaps unlikely to be heeded in this noisy second Gilded Age."
Of "punitive sentiments and punitive policies"—a searching study of the explosion of American prisons, seemingly one of the nation's only growth industry. Read full book review >
ALL EYES ARE UPON US by Jason Sokol
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 2, 2014

"With sharp research and insights, Sokol follows this blithe and self-congratulatory legacy through the election of President Barack Obama."
Sokol (History/Univ. of New Hampshire; There Goes My Everything: White Southerners in the Age of Civil Rights, 1945-1975, 2006) exposes the troubled truth about the North's racial integration.Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Dec. 2, 2014

"Well-handled by Davis: both heart gladdening and a challenge to start making sense of national immigration policy."
The story of four high schoolers from the wrong side of Phoenix who built a robot, entered it in a national competition that included such prestigious schools as MIT, and won. Read full book review >

GAY BERLIN by Robert Beachy
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 20, 2014

"A brave new work of compelling research."
An elucidating, somewhat startling study of how early German tolerance and liberalism encouraged homosexual expression. Read full book review >
MEN by Laura Kipnis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 18, 2014

"Dynamite examples rendered in funny, spirited writing."
Feisty, unapologetic forays into the messiness of gender relations. Read full book review >
SECOND AVENUE CAPER by Joyce Brabner
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 18, 2014

"The art of cartoonist Zingarelli underscores the tone of the text."
A graphic memoir detailing a pot-dealing scheme that helped finance treatment for those dying from AIDS in the early days before the epidemic even had that name. Read full book review >
YOU HAVE TO FUCKING EAT by Adam Mansbach
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 12, 2014

"A likable variation on a universal fucking theme."
Mansbach's (Rage Is Back, 2013, etc.) second children's book satire/foulmouthed balm for exhausted parents spotlights the agony of managing toddlers at mealtime.Read full book review >
A COUNTRY CALLED CHILDHOOD by Jay Griffiths
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"A provocative critique of modern society."
Griffiths (Wild: An Elemental Journey, 2006, etc.) focuses on the lives of children in her continued exploration of the role of nature in giving meaning to our lives. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Quietly uplifting reading."
A socially conscious Episcopalian priest's account of how and why she started the Thistle Stop Café, a Nashville teahouse that employs females recovering from violence and drug abuse. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"A rah-rah effort that will appeal to fans of military histories and those who have close contact with the courageous soldiers who put their lives on the line."
An upbeat book about contemporary military veterans, the men and women of America who are "brave enough to assume the ultimate risk so that others could live." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >