Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 3)

IS SHAME NECESSARY? by Jennifer Jacquet
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Feb. 17, 2015

"A sharp and surprising dissertation that puts the many facets of shame in a whole new light."
An intellectually stimulating discussion of shame and its enduring place in the digital age. Read full book review >
WIDE-OPEN WORLD by John Marshall
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 10, 2015

"A great armchair adventure that should inspire others to consider voluntourism as a way to help others and see the world."
One family's adventures volunteering in foreign countries. Read full book review >

HOW TO BE A HUSBAND by Tim Dowling
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 5, 2015

"Tongue-in-cheek observations on married life coupled with poignant moments of true love and grief."
One man's humorous tips on navigating the complex marriage highway. Read full book review >
I AM NOT A SLUT by Leora Tanenbaum
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A significant, spirited analysis sure to be embraced by feminists and deserving of wide attention."
An enthusiastic update on the state of female sexual liberation in contemporary society. Read full book review >
MORE THAN HAPPY by Serena B. Miller
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A rich, entertaining compendium of thoughts on the Amish way of life."
An analysis of family life in Amish communities. Read full book review >

THE OCCUPIERS by Michael A. Gould-Wartofsky
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A valuable view of the explosive movement that gave voice to outrage over our new gilded age."
Sociology doctoral student Gould-Wartofsky debuts with an inside look at the "new, new Left" that emerged when fewer than 2,000 people seized New York City's Zuccotti Park, near Wall Street, in 2011, sparking similar protest rallies against the wealthiest "1 Percent" in some 1,500 towns and cities. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"Sound advice on managing family finances but only if you have sufficient finances to manage."
Talking big bucks with the smallest members of your household will make the world a better place argues New York Times personal finance columnist Lieber (co-author: Taking Time Off, 2003, etc.).Read full book review >
THE TROUBLE WITH POST-BLACKNESS by Houston A. Baker
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A thoughtful, if not gentle, scholarly refutation of a controversial claim of a post-racial society."
What does it mean to be black in America now? A wide variety of scholars and deep thinkers respond in these essays on race, society, art and more. Read full book review >
NEW RULES OF THE GAME by Susan Packard
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A straightforward guide to success that deserves a prime spot on the bookshelves of career women aspiring to reach the highest corporate ranks."
A variety of no-nonsense strategies for women who aspire to be leaders in business. Read full book review >
WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A moving essay that should find its way into the hands of all students and teachers to provoke new conversation and awareness."
An enchanting plea by the award-winning Nigerian novelist to channel anger about gender inequality into positive change. Read full book review >
THE ALMOST NEARLY PERFECT PEOPLE by Michael Booth
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"Blithely reporting on the many quirks in dress (Norwegian dirndls), food (an odiferous Icelandic fish specialty) and excessive drinking (everywhere) that he encountered on his journeys, Booth offers an affectionate, observant, engaging look at Scandinavia, where trust, modesty and equality proudly prevail."
A shrewd look at Nordic life. Read full book review >
FLASHPOINTS by George Friedman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"A thoughtful, uncluttered treatise considering Europe's intractable patterns of unemployment, immigration and racism."
This nonacademic but erudite view of European history shows that the 20th century's trauma of war and violence is not quite behind us. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >