Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 3)

VISUAL INTELLIGENCE by Amy E. Herman
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 3, 2016

"Sharp and original, this book should alter how readers look at the world."
A comprehensive guide to seeing what others do not, distilled from art historian Herman's acclaimed seminar The Art of Perception. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 3, 2016

"Spirited, witty, and ferociously incisive."
Bitch Media co-founder and creative director Zeisler (Feminism and Pop Culture, 2008) ruminates about how the current wave of feminism does not "challenge beliefs…so much as it offers nips and tucks."Read full book review >

ONEIDA by Ellen Wayland-Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A smartly contextualized tale of 'the tension between radical social critique and unapologetic accommodation...between communal harmony and individual striving.'"
A study of the unlikely origins of one of America's most recognizable brands. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 2, 2016

"A thoughtful historical study of the entrenched symbolism of a dreaded bridge in Mississippi, a landmark that 'fixed attention on Jim Crow's brutal excesses and unresolved legacies.'"
History of the most notorious sites in Mississippi for white-on-black violence, from 1918 to 1966. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2016

"A comprehensive analysis that lays the foundation for a discussion of necessary reforms and how they can be achieved."
Why the theories used to rationalize our beliefs in democracy are broken beyond repair and must be replaced. Read full book review >

ONE by Edward Mapplethorpe
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: May 1, 2016

"A wonderful portfolio of little monsters—or little angels, as you prefer."
A noted photographer turns from his previous interest in abstract portraiture to immediate, evocative studies of infants in their splendid innocence. Read full book review >
THE GREAT ACCELERATION by Robert Colvile
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2016

"A familiar argument but with interesting twists and a rosier forecast than many other books of social/technological criticism."
A well-paced consideration of the effects of technology on lives made ever busier by it—and whipping by in a whirlwind as a result. Read full book review >
OLD AGE by Michael Kinsley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 26, 2016

"An uneven but ultimately satisfying examination of the importance of 'long years of good health, not long years simply breathing in and out.'"
A short book about aging and baby boomers that mixes memoir and self-help. Read full book review >
THE NEW ARAB WARS by Marc Lynch
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 26, 2016

"An excellent, clear distillation of recent events in the Middle East."
A keen observer of the violent upheaval in the Middle East since the Arab Spring makes a strong assertion: there is no returning to the old autocratic ways. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 26, 2016

"Well written and full of firsthand insight—a good companion to weightier studies such as Timothy Miller's The 60s Communes (1999) and Arthur Kopecky's Leaving New Buffalo Commune (2006)."
If you can remember the '60s, you may have been there—but as a very young person, as this thoughtful history reveals. Read full book review >
THE GUNNING OF AMERICA by Pamela Haag
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"A refreshingly unusual approach by an author admirably transparent about why she wrote the book and why she chose to avoid more traditional approaches."
An examination of the controversial realm of American gun culture through the perspective of gun manufacturers, with an emphasis on the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. Read full book review >
GHETTO by Mitchell Duneier
HISTORY
Released: April 19, 2016

"Americans did not create the ghetto, but in this well-documented study, we see clearly how those urban areas have come to embody so many of our shortcomings when it comes to matters of race."
How communities—especially in the United States—created, ostracized, and condemned the idea and reality of the ghetto. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >