Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 3)

THE LYNCHING by Laurence Leamer
HISTORY
Released: June 7, 2016

"An engrossing true-crime narrative and a pertinent reminder of the consequences of organized hatred."
A powerful account of how a Ku Klux Klan-sanctioned lynching in Mobile, Alabama, paved the way for legal victories against such hate groups. Read full book review >
THE FATE OF GENDER by Frank Browning
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A timely, thoughtful contribution to a much-debated issue."
A journalist and cultural critic investigates the "shifting terrain of gender." Read full book review >

THE INNER LIVES OF MARKETS by Ray Fisman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A thoughtful examination of the mechanics of our one-click world."
How economic theories power our market-driven lives. Read full book review >
SEX OBJECT by Jessica Valenti
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"Though lively and richly detailed, Valenti's work lacks the self-awareness essential to a memoir worth pondering."
A new memoir from the Guardian columnist and "professional feminist." Read full book review >
WHO COOKED ADAM SMITH'S DINNER? by Katrine Marçal
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 6, 2016

"An exciting reassessment of the global economy that provocatively extends the frontiers of the feminist critique."
A Swedish political and economic writer shows why "feminism's best-kept secret is just how necessary a feminist perspective is in the search for a solution to our mainstream economic problems. Read full book review >

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 1, 2016

"Entertaining common-sense advice for parents to ensure that their children don't run amok."
Sensible suggestions on how to raise your children so they don't become screaming brats who offend everyone around them. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 2016

"An accessible academic analysis of the progression of American children's lives since 1800."
A comprehensive investigation of how Americans have raised their children in the past two centuries. Read full book review >
THE WORLD ACCORDING TO STAR WARS by Cass R. Sunstein
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 31, 2016

"Certainly odd but also smart and interesting. For any student who wants to write a term paper on Star Wars, this book could serve as a rich resource."
An exploration of how Star Wars "illuminates childhood, the complicated relationship between good and evil, rebellions, political change, and constitutional law." Read full book review >
THE GEEK FEMINIST REVOLUTION by Kameron Hurley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 31, 2016

"Passion and commitment permeate the writing as Hurley illuminates the online cultural vanguard from a feminist's perspective."
A feminist manifesto from the front lines of fantasy fiction, Internet flaming, and Gamergate battles. Read full book review >
WHITE RAGE by Carol Anderson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 31, 2016

"A book that provides necessary perspective on the racial conflagrations in the U.S."
A close reading of America's racial chasm. Read full book review >
FREE SPEECH by Timothy Garton Ash
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 24, 2016

"A thorough and well-argued contribution to the quest for global free speech norms."
A field guide to the challenges of setting standards for free speech in a "cosmopolis" of diverse cultures. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"A sharp but limited critical analysis of how the role of women in the rise of the tea party is affecting conservative political change."
An academic analysis of the rise of the conservative tea party movement and its uniquely large female membership. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >