Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 3)

WISH LANTERNS by Alec Ash
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Sensitive, fascinating reports."
Novelistic anecdotes reveal Chinese young people struggling with universal themes of education, employment, and love. Read full book review >
FRAUD by Edward J. Balleisen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A touch arid at times, but overall a fascinating, illuminating look at bunko and the social conditions under which its practitioners operate—and flourish."
A broad-ranging study of the big swindle in American life over the last couple of centuries. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A valuable contribution to the history of the early republic and to the scholarly literature of civil rights."
In actual practice, it has been far from self-evident in America that all men—all people—are created equal. Read full book review >
THE CRUNK FEMINIST COLLECTION by Brittney C. Cooper
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A valuable record of the collective's contributions to a growing cultural awareness of feminist issues and criticism, particularly for women of color."
A collection of feminist essays on sex, gender, pop culture, politics, and friendship. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"A sharp analysis of an increasingly pressing problem, but Nichols falls short of proposing a satisfying solution."
Some fresh twists on a familiar theme: the dumbing down of America amid the defiant distrust of expertise. Read full book review >

A COLONY IN A NATION by Chris Hayes
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 2017

"A timely and impassioned argument for social justice."
Profound contrasts in policing and incarceration reveal disparate Americas. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 7, 2017

"Sunny, easy-to-follow self-help principles."
A series of practical steps for women to self-improve and help each other. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Solid research into the dilemmas regarding genetic screening and how it is used for fetuses and newborns."
When scientific ability and human desire coalesce into a potent tool that can profoundly change life. Read full book review >
THE KINGDOM OF HAPPINESS by Aimee Groth
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"An intriguing business/sociological chronicle with wider implications for modern corporate practices."
An investigation into the social experiments at the corporate headquarters of Zappos that raises some important questions about entrepreneurship, business management methods, and human values. Read full book review >
LIBERATING MINDS by Ellen Condliffe Lagemann
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A valuable arsenal of information for policymakers seeking prison reform in the present political climate."
A strong argument for expanding college-level study in the nation's prisons. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"You don't have to be a paranoiac to have enemies, and you don't need to be an outlaw to want to keep your personal information personal. Though with more than a whiff of conspiracy theory to it, Mitnick's book is a much-needed operating manual for the cyberage."
A highly useful handbook for how not to be seen—online, anyway. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"An illuminating look at what the brave new world of the future may hold."
A fresh look at the nature vs. nurture debate and the role of race in shaping intelligence and personality. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >