Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

THE ATTENTION MERCHANTS by Tim Wu
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"Forget subliminal seduction: every day, we are openly bought and sold, as this provocative book shows."
When something online is free, then the product being sold is you. Wu (Columbia Law School; The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires, 2010) elaborates on that sobering note. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"An endlessly fascinating kaleidoscope of American history. A fantastic historical resource."
From the Dutch to the British, featuring a concentration on the waves of Irish and German in the late 19th century, this thoroughgoing work offers a host of immigrant sagas that were integral to the creation of the New York City cauldron. Read full book review >

Making Out Like a Virgin by Catriona McHardy
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"A valuable compilation that represents multiple paths for healing and thriving after sexual trauma."
Sexual abuse survivors from around the world detail their journeys to healthy sexuality and bodily autonomy in this collection. Read full book review >
Evolution on Trial by Anonymous
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"A defensive and unconvincing argument against evolutionary theory."
A debut work of nonfiction argues that the case for evolution turns out to be much weaker than widely assumed. Read full book review >
WE WANTED WORKERS by George J. Borjas
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Although the economic analyses may be obscure to some noneconomist readers, Borjas provides an intriguing, clearly written polemic."
A counternarrative to the many misguided ideas about immigrants arriving in the United States. Read full book review >

MUCH ADO by Michael Lenehan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A series of bright, clear photographs of what the author saw when he pulled aside the curtain in a Wisconsin Oz."
A veteran former editor and current freelance journalist delivers a swift story about being imbedded with a summer outdoor theater company mounting a production of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing. Read full book review >
VIOLENT BORDERS by Reece Jones
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"With the building of border walls and the deaths of migrants much in the news, this work is both timely and necessarily provocative."
"Tear down this wall!" was Ronald Reagan's ringing challenge to Mikhail Gorbachev in 1987. Now, a geographer calls for more drastic action, arguing that border walls everywhere should come down. Read full book review >
VITAL LITTLE PLANS by Jane Jacobs
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A timely volume that supports Jacobs' aim to 'stir up some independent thinking urgently needed as a wake-up call for America.' A perfect complement to Robert Kanigel's excellent biography, Eyes on the Street (2016)."
A collection of short pieces by an outspoken champion of urban diversity. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A diverse and entertaining set of memories on how a Nigerian man became an American."
A Nigerian man explains how and why he moved to the United States. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A nuanced, forthright, emotionally compelling take on a painful subject."
How family dynamics can reflect racial prejudices in society as a whole. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A delightfully witty, enjoyable read."
A Brit living in the United States exposes the dark side of the happiness business in her adopted country. Read full book review >
YOU CAN'T TOUCH MY HAIR by Phoebe Robinson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Up-and-down humor that sometimes gets to the heart of the realities of being black in America."
A black female comedian lays it all out there. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >