Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

Technocracy in America by Parag Khanna
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A refreshingly original contribution to the ongoing analysis of the American political system."
A radical reappraisal of democracy and its decline in the United States. Read full book review >
THE EGYPTIANS by Jack Shenker
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A troubling yet highly engaging catch-up on the state of incomplete revolution in Egypt."
A sharp jab at the neoliberal economics adopted by Egypt over the last decades, which ultimately spurred grass-roots revolt. Read full book review >

RADICALIZATION by Farhad Khosrokhavar
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A timely, systematic breakdown of thee reasons for radicalization."
A French scholar delineates the attractions of violent extremism, specifically jihadi Islam. Read full book review >
SPARK by Angie Morgan
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A straightforward presentation that promotes values of conduct most of us would be proud to share."
Three former U.S. military officers advocate for transferring military leadership methods into the civilian business sector and beyond. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 20, 2016

"A sharp contribution to a significant topic that continues to generate heated discussion and debate."
A tour d'horizon of the historical relationship among race, racism, and mental illness. Read full book review >

THE LAST FAITH by Karmak Bagisbayev
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 8, 2016

"This ambitious book's unique structure offers some unusual, intriguing moments."
A writer tries to answer all of life's mysteries by having a Socratic dialogue with God in this debut philosophical work. Read full book review >
REST by Alex Soojung-Kim Pang
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A useful holiday gift at a time when New Year's resolutions will be on the agenda."
Why being a workaholic is not the key to greater productivity. Read full book review >
AGAINST EMPATHY by Paul Bloom
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"An intriguing counterattack to modern psychological cynicism."
The potential of empathy to lead to cruelty prompts Bloom (Psychology/Yale Univ.; Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil, 2013, etc.) to promote the function of compassion, which is informed by rational deliberation. Read full book review >
WHEN WE RISE by Cleve Jones
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"The frank and sometimes-graphic timeline of one gay man's life, his involvement in promoting gay rights, and the AIDS epidemic."
A key member of the San Francisco gay movement traces his life story. Read full book review >
ISLAND PEOPLE by Joshua Jelly-Schapiro
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"An eminently well-informed narrative."
A geographer's exuberant travel narrative about the nations and people of the Caribbean. Read full book review >
RULES FOR REVOLUTIONARIES by Becky Bond
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 18, 2016

"A lively update of and rejoinder to Saul Alinsky's Rules for Radicals, which, as this book very well may do, has long offered guidance to the right as well as the left."
Senior advisers to the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign leadership offer pointers on how to start the next movement—or perhaps continue the one they started. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A lively contribution to popular histories of New York and its institutions, worthy of shelving alongside Robert Caro's The Power Broker and Edwin Burrows and Mike Wallace's Gotham."
An eye-opening history of the Manhattan hospital whose name is a byword for asylums everywhere. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >