Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

LIBERATING MINDS by Ellen Condliffe Lagemann
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A valuable arsenal of information for policymakers seeking prison reform in the present political climate."
A strong argument for expanding college-level study in the nation's prisons. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"An illuminating look at what the brave new world of the future may hold."
A fresh look at the nature vs. nurture debate and the role of race in shaping intelligence and personality. Read full book review >

FRAUD by Edward J. Balleisen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A touch arid at times, but overall a fascinating, illuminating look at bunko and the social conditions under which its practitioners operate—and flourish."
A broad-ranging study of the big swindle in American life over the last couple of centuries. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"Attention-grabbing research that amply shows the many detriments of social media, particularly for young adults."
The latest exploration of why social media may not be so great after all. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A heartwarmingly inspirational tale."
A former magazine editor tells the story of how, at the height of the Great Depression, her great-uncle trained a group of young women from rural Oklahoma to become college basketball stars. Read full book review >

WHAT LOVE IS by Carrie Jenkins
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Those who don't already have a good idea what love is before beginning the volume won't have gained one by its conclusion."
In her first book, Jenkins (Philosophy/Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver) examines romantic love as a phenomenon at the intersection of biology and social convention. Read full book review >
LONG SHOT by Craig Hodges
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A skillfully told, affecting memoir of sports and social activism."
A former professional basketball player looks back on his life on and off the court, with an emphasis on how his outspokenness regarding racial discrimination led to his unofficial banishment from the NBA. Read full book review >
RISE by Cara Brookins
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Not without its flaws but an inspiring memoir of absolute determination."
A memoir of a mother and her children building a house—and security—from the ground up. Read full book review >
TESTOSTERONE REX by Cordelia Fine
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A fascinating, greatly contemplative discussion of sex and gender and the embedded societal expectations of both."
A cerebral assessment of gender, society, and sexuality. Read full book review >
THE BIMBO HAS BRAINS by Cathy Burnham Martin
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Jan. 21, 2017

"Amusing but uneven reflections on relationships."
A volume of anecdotes, lists, quotes, and jokes seeks to illuminate the complexities of gender politics and romance. Read full book review >
THE ART OF BEING FREE by James Poulos
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"Provocative assertions buried in a confusing presentation."
A journalist expands on Alexis de Tocqueville's cultural critiques of American life. Read full book review >
TEARS WE CANNOT STOP by Michael Eric Dyson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"The readership Dyson addresses may not fully be convinced, but it can hardly remain unmoved by his fiery prose."
The provocateur-scholar returns to the pulpit to deliver a hard-hitting sermon on the racial divide, directed specifically to a white congregation. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >