Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

GIRLS AND SEX by Peggy Orenstein
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 29, 2016

"Ample, valuable information on the way young women in America perceive and react to their sexual environment."
An examination of the newest trends in the sex lives of young women in America. Read full book review >
PUSHOUT by Monique W. Morris
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 29, 2016

"A powerful and thought-provoking book of social science."
A writer and educator explores how various learning environments marginalize black girls and push them away from positive and productive futures. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 29, 2016

"Akron glitters like never before in these illuminating pages."
An economist/public policy adviser and a financial journalist envision a transformative resurgence in industrial regions that had threatened to rust from within. Read full book review >
ENGINES OF LIBERTY by David Cole
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 29, 2016

"Cole's book is compelling, especially in today's climate of gridlock following the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. While the title of the book proposes a how-to for the average person, however, the precept becomes fuzzy when these champions are NRA presidents, Harvard lawyers, and other highly visible proponents."
An analysis of how Constitutional law can be changed by principled and committed people who work outside the system rather than within it. Read full book review >
WHY BE JEWISH? by Edgar M. Bronfman
RELIGION
Released: March 22, 2016

"One man's personal call to laggard Jews to study, learn, and seek justice in a broken world. Readers of other persuasions may also profit from his insight into bits of Jewish thought and practice."
The late businessman and philanthropist answers his title's question with a last testament of sorts. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 22, 2016

"An imaginative take on teaching sure to inspire controversy."
An award-winning educator proposes radical changes. Read full book review >
THE CRIME OF ALL CRIMES by Nicole Rafter
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 22, 2016

"A comparative criminological approach to genocide, bloodless in pursuit of scientific inquiry and most appropriate for students and specialists."
A criminologist attempts to understand genocide and its etiology. Read full book review >
THE MIND CLUB by Daniel M. Wegner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 22, 2016

"Complex science lightly delivered; a pleasure for anyone comfortable with the thought that knowing others' minds will improve our own."
Do the dead have thoughts? The late Harvard psychology professor Wegner (The Illusion of Conscious Will, 2002, etc.), assisted by neuroscientist Gray (Mind Perception and Morality/Univ. of North Carolina), ponders that ethereal question and much more.Read full book review >
LIFE REIMAGINED by Barbara Bradley Hagerty
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 15, 2016

"For midlifers eager to 'create a new habit of mind,' Hagerty is a rousing cheerleader."
An upbeat look at the joys of middle age. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 15, 2016

"Thoughtful political theory for divisive times."
Longtime national affairs writer Woodard (American Nation: A History of Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America, 2011, etc.) builds on his previous analysis of the country's regional differences to focus on the conflict between individualism and collectivism that defines our national character.Read full book review >
The End of Democracy and Faith by Sean Wallace
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 15, 2016

"A sometimes-intriguing but often familiar treatise against the oppressive forces of democracy and religion."
In this debut work of political philosophy, Wallace argues that American society is hindered by the twin restraints of democracy and religion. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 12, 2016

"A lengthy manifesto for AMCAP that lays out a vision for an ascendant black America."
Rempson (Minority Access to Higher Education In N.Y. City, 1972) examines what he sees as the root causes of education and economic-mobility gaps that affect African-American males.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >