Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

THE GUNNING OF AMERICA by Pamela Haag
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"A refreshingly unusual approach by an author admirably transparent about why she wrote the book and why she chose to avoid more traditional approaches."
An examination of the controversial realm of American gun culture through the perspective of gun manufacturers, with an emphasis on the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. Read full book review >
GHETTO by Mitchell Duneier
HISTORY
Released: April 19, 2016

"Americans did not create the ghetto, but in this well-documented study, we see clearly how those urban areas have come to embody so many of our shortcomings when it comes to matters of race."
How communities—especially in the United States—created, ostracized, and condemned the idea and reality of the ghetto. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 19, 2016

"An important account of medicine's role in a world in crisis."
A behind-the-scenes look at the nascent field of humanitarian medicine as it has evolved in recent years of civil wars, famines, tsunamis, and other natural and man-made disasters. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 19, 2016

"A concise, informative look at the problem of obesity and the factors that make it a rapidly growing epidemic."
A short debut guide presents the common causes, complications, and cultural norms surrounding weight issues. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 12, 2016

"Racism is the enduring scar on the American consciousness. In this ambitious, magisterial book, Kendi reveals just how deep that scar cuts and why it endures, its barely subcutaneous pain still able to flare."
An accomplished history of racist thought and practice in the United States from the Puritans to the present. Read full book review >

DOOR TO DOOR by Edward Humes
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 12, 2016

"A revealing look at the reality and impact of our 'buy-it-now, same-day-delivery, traffic-packed world.'"
The story of the massive, complex global system that transports people and things from door to door, day and night. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 5, 2016

"Easy-to-read, up-to-date information on the latest research into pregnancy, childbirth, and early childhood."
The latest scientific findings on child-rearing from pregnancy through toddlerhood. Read full book review >
CONVICTING THE INNOCENT by Stanley Cohen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 5, 2016

"A valuable accounting of a hidden societal plague, likelier to appeal to attorneys, students, and activists than to the police officers, prosecutors, and 'tough on crime' types who should read it."
A disturbing compendium of wrongful convictions resulting in death sentences, focusing on individual stories and patterns of institutional failure. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Tantalizing perspectives on cultivating sharing, honesty, and cooperation via game theory."
Game theory strategies to handle everyday parental quandaries, especially the unpleasant variety. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 15, 2016

"Thoughtful political theory for divisive times."
Longtime national affairs writer Woodard (American Nation: A History of Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America, 2011, etc.) builds on his previous analysis of the country's regional differences to focus on the conflict between individualism and collectivism that defines our national character.Read full book review >
BULLIES by Alex Abramovich
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"A sharp, provocative memoir of an unlikely friendship."
A journalist's account of his friendship with a man who was not only president of a motorcycle group, but also the boy who bullied him during childhood. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Although the author's well-delineated examples will ring outrageous to modern-day ears, she reminds us how much there is still to be achieved."
An elucidating study of landmark sex-discrimination cases waged in the wake of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >