Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

BULLIES by Alex Abramovich
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"A sharp, provocative memoir of an unlikely friendship."
A journalist's account of his friendship with a man who was not only president of a motorcycle group, but also the boy who bullied him during childhood. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Although the author's well-delineated examples will ring outrageous to modern-day ears, she reminds us how much there is still to be achieved."
An elucidating study of landmark sex-discrimination cases waged in the wake of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Read full book review >

UNTIL WE ARE FREE by Shirin Ebadi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"The captivating and candid story of a woman who took on the Iranian government and survived, despite every attempt to make her fail."
A leading activist speaks out about inequality and injustices in Iran. Read full book review >
STREETFIGHT by Janette Sadik-Khan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 8, 2016

"An impressive tactical look back at an urban redevelopment pioneer who changed the look and manageability of countless New York City streets."
A former New York City transportation commissioner maps out her adroit street design blueprint for alleviating traffic congestion and improving urban aesthetics. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"An authoritative account of the challenges facing progressives wishing to fuse better governance with economic justice."
An energetic if grim discussion of inequality and the coming era of underemployment, viewed through the lens of the forgotten American progressive narrative. Read full book review >

THE END OF KARMA by Somini Sengupta
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2016

"A compelling portrait of what will soon be the world's most populous nation, one on the verge of great change—for better or worse."
India's young population is growing dramatically, writes Indian-American journalist Sengupta—and it's growing impatient with the roadblocks its elders have erected. Read full book review >
A MURDER OVER A GIRL by Ken Corbett
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 1, 2016

"An emotionally resonant account of a real-life tragedy."
A teenager's murder raises issues of bullying and homophobia. Read full book review >
AMERICAN GIRLS by Nancy Jo Sales
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"For parents with young daughters, this book is an ice-cold, important wake-up call."
What happens to teenage girls when their social lives play out online? Read full book review >
Nani's Tale by Corey Fair
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 17, 2016

"A taut and rewarding tale about a young girl's frightening life and last-minute rescue.
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A little girl struggles to find love and salvation against terrifying odds in this debut novel. Read full book review >
INCARCERATION NATIONS by Baz Dreisinger
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"An eye-opening, damning indictment of the American prison system and the way its sins reverberate around the globe."
A writer and social activist chronicles her visits to prisons around the globe to gain insight into what works and doesn't work. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A usefully organized, concise history of social movements that will appeal to newer generations of activists."
Optimistic overview of the recent surge in politically directed, nonviolent mass advocacy movements, focused on historical examples and the tactical future. Read full book review >
UNTANGLED by Lisa Damour
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Expert information and counsel on helping parents raise well-rounded girls."
The director of the Laurel School's Center for Research on Girls offers parents concrete advice on how to help their teenage daughters navigate the often tumultuous teenage years. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >