Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

Obama's Challenge to China by Chi Wang
Released: July 1, 2015

"An informative, persuasive look at the current state of Chinese-American relations."
Wang (The United States and China Since World War II, 2013, etc.) offers an analysis of Obama's China policy and the continuing points of contention in the Chinese-American relationship. Read full book review >
Released: June 30, 2015

"A sound study that carries an urgent message."
A compelling argument for women's rights. Read full book review >

THE GOOD SHUFU by Tracy Slater
Released: June 30, 2015

"A heartfelt and moving tale, coupling insights into two remarkably different cultures with a love story that, as much as any true love story can, delivers a happy ending."
A writer goes to the far side of the world for work and finds a home. Read full book review >
Suicide by Simon Critchley
Released: June 23, 2015

"A brief yet erudite and compellingly original survey that will provoke both personal thought and lively group discussion."
A unique dialectic on the contentious phenomenon of suicide from a noted British philosopher and academic. Read full book review >
Released: June 16, 2015

"Often hilarious, consistently informative, and unusually helpful."
The ever hip and funny comedian and Parks and Recreation star embarks on a surprisingly insightful exploration of the complex realities of dating today. Read full book review >

Released: June 9, 2015

"A potent introduction to a nearly forgotten part of the civil rights movement and a personalized reminder of what it was truly about."
A powerful memoir of the civil rights movement, specifically the dramatic struggle to integrate the schools in Prince Edward County, Virginia. Read full book review >
Released: June 9, 2015

"A provocative discussion of how public investment and private entrepreneurship can combine to shape future advantages from existing used and unused capacities."
Drawing on her business success, Internet entrepreneur and internationally respected transport expert Chase details how digital infrastructure can be used to organize excess capacity and generate profit in service businesses. Read full book review >
Released: June 9, 2015

"Clynes makes a persuasive case for allowing gifted children the freedom and resources to pursue their interests."
Popular Science contributing editor Clynes (Music Festivals From Bach to Blues: A Travellers Guide, 1996, etc.) uses the story of Taylor Wilson—who, at age 14, became "one of only thirty-two individuals on the planet to build a working fusion reactor, a miniature sun on Earth"—to illustrate the potential for improving our educational system.Read full book review >
Released: June 9, 2015

"Tragic, gripping, and authentic, this book deserves a wide audience."
An investigation into the plague of violence engulfing a generation of American youth. Read full book review >
Released: June 9, 2015

"Well-presented, solid facts that address the many detriments of helicopter parenting."
Why helicopter parents are doing more harm than good to their children. Read full book review >
Crossroads by Christopher Conte
Released: June 3, 2015

"A strong collection of memoiristic writing that illuminates African womanhood while blending diverse styles and experiences."
Conte, a former Wall Street Journal reporter, collects 15 autobiographical essays by Ugandan women that question stereotypes of African femininity. Read full book review >
NAKED AT LUNCH by Mark Haskell Smith
Released: June 2, 2015

"A thoughtful and entertaining analysis of why so many still want to ditch their clothes and let it all hang out."
An open-minded writer drops his skivvies at various locations around the world in an amusing and earnest attempt to understand the appeal of nudism. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >