Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

CONVICTING THE INNOCENT by Stanley Cohen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 5, 2016

"A valuable accounting of a hidden societal plague, likelier to appeal to attorneys, students, and activists than to the police officers, prosecutors, and 'tough on crime' types who should read it."
A disturbing compendium of wrongful convictions resulting in death sentences, focusing on individual stories and patterns of institutional failure. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Tantalizing perspectives on cultivating sharing, honesty, and cooperation via game theory."
Game theory strategies to handle everyday parental quandaries, especially the unpleasant variety. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 15, 2016

"Thoughtful political theory for divisive times."
Longtime national affairs writer Woodard (American Nation: A History of Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America, 2011, etc.) builds on his previous analysis of the country's regional differences to focus on the conflict between individualism and collectivism that defines our national character.Read full book review >
BULLIES by Alex Abramovich
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"A sharp, provocative memoir of an unlikely friendship."
A journalist's account of his friendship with a man who was not only president of a motorcycle group, but also the boy who bullied him during childhood. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Although the author's well-delineated examples will ring outrageous to modern-day ears, she reminds us how much there is still to be achieved."
An elucidating study of landmark sex-discrimination cases waged in the wake of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Read full book review >

UNTIL WE ARE FREE by Shirin Ebadi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"The captivating and candid story of a woman who took on the Iranian government and survived, despite every attempt to make her fail."
A leading activist speaks out about inequality and injustices in Iran. Read full book review >
STREETFIGHT by Janette Sadik-Khan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 8, 2016

"An impressive tactical look back at an urban redevelopment pioneer who changed the look and manageability of countless New York City streets."
A former New York City transportation commissioner maps out her adroit street design blueprint for alleviating traffic congestion and improving urban aesthetics. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"An authoritative account of the challenges facing progressives wishing to fuse better governance with economic justice."
An energetic if grim discussion of inequality and the coming era of underemployment, viewed through the lens of the forgotten American progressive narrative. Read full book review >
THE END OF KARMA by Somini Sengupta
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2016

"A compelling portrait of what will soon be the world's most populous nation, one on the verge of great change—for better or worse."
India's young population is growing dramatically, writes Indian-American journalist Sengupta—and it's growing impatient with the roadblocks its elders have erected. Read full book review >
A MURDER OVER A GIRL by Ken Corbett
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 1, 2016

"An emotionally resonant account of a real-life tragedy."
A teenager's murder raises issues of bullying and homophobia. Read full book review >
AMERICAN GIRLS by Nancy Jo Sales
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"For parents with young daughters, this book is an ice-cold, important wake-up call."
What happens to teenage girls when their social lives play out online? Read full book review >
Nani's Tale by Corey Fair
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 17, 2016

"A taut and rewarding tale about a young girl's frightening life and last-minute rescue.
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A little girl struggles to find love and salvation against terrifying odds in this debut novel. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >