Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

THE KINGDOM OF SPEECH by Tom Wolfe
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 30, 2016

"Typically, Wolfe throws a Molotov cocktail at conventional wisdom in a book that won't settle any argument but is sure to start some."
A fresh look at an old controversy, as a master provocateur suggests that human language renders the theory of evolution more like a fable than scientific fact. Read full book review >
SUBSTITUTE by Nicholson Baker
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An affecting (long-exposure) snapshot revealing real-life concerns."
The eminent Maine-based author chronicles his lively, maddening month substitute teaching in the local public schools. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An intriguing assessment of the effectiveness of a variety of global parenting customs."
A close examination of parenting practices across the globe. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 19, 2016

"A concise, informative look at the problem of obesity and the factors that make it a rapidly growing epidemic."
A short debut guide presents the common causes, complications, and cultural norms surrounding weight issues. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Dec. 12, 2015

"A fervent warning about environmental dangers accompanied by a thorough list of resources."
A comprehensive collection of information about nanoparticles and their impact on the environment. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Timely, controversial, and bound to stir already heated discussion."
An impassioned analysis of headline-making cases of police shootings and other acts of "state violence" against blacks and other minorities. Read full book review >
BORN BRIGHT by C. Nicole Mason
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A thoughtful, well-crafted rejoinder to Claude Brown's half-century-old Manchild in the Promised Land, speaking to the power of hope and the institutional changes needed to make hope possible."
The aspirational story of a young African-American woman's rise from poverty. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A nuanced, forthright, emotionally compelling take on a painful subject."
How family dynamics can reflect racial prejudices in society as a whole. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"It's no match for Jesse Sheidlower's fluent, fun The F Word (1995), but Bergen's study is still a winner for the psycholinguistics nerd in the house."
An examination of the sub rosa language that sets us all atwitter—and athwart. Read full book review >
WE WANTED WORKERS by George J. Borjas
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Although the economic analyses may be obscure to some noneconomist readers, Borjas provides an intriguing, clearly written polemic."
A counternarrative to the many misguided ideas about immigrants arriving in the United States. Read full book review >
UNSPORTSMANLIKE CONDUCT by Jessica Luther
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Highly relevant, hard-hitting, much-needed information that reveals the widespread existence of rape by sports players on college campuses."
Investigative reporting that uncovers the rape culture surrounding college sports, particularly football. Read full book review >
WHEN STRANGERS MEET by Kio Stark
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Hardly groundbreaking but a pleasant little book about making connections."
Don't be a stranger advises this short book on connecting with others. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >