Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

Katrina, Mississippi by NancyKay Sullivan Wessman
HISTORY
Released: July 14, 2015

"A scholarly landmark in the history of a major storm.
"
Wessman (You Can Fix the Fat from Childhood & Other Heart Disease Risks, Too, 2012) tells stories of people who helped save three Mississippi counties during Hurricane Katrina.Read full book review >
Religion and Reason by F. B. Nieman
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: June 26, 2015

"Although this book makes a good case for putting more reason in religion, it will fail to convince the skeptical."
A Catholic academic attempts to reconcile the concepts of reason and religion. Read full book review >

THE END OF WHITE CHRISTIAN AMERICA by Robert P. Jones
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 12, 2016

"A missed opportunity to explore an important cultural change in the making."
A pundit considers the decline of Christian religious influence on American politics and culture. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"A vivid, compelling account of a life on the edge."
The mother of the 18-year-old killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014 relates the saga of her life in the St. Louis suburb, expressing her love for her children on nearly every page. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 21, 2016

"Indian casinos are likely to be around for a long time to come, and Mitchell's exposé goes a long way toward explaining the whys and hows."
That casino on the nearby reservation? Think of it as revenge for Christopher Columbus, as some wags have put it—but also a sophisticated operation that makes use of every legal loophole available. Read full book review >

FAMINE, AFFLUENCE, AND MORALITY by Peter Singer
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 2, 2015

"A useful compendium of a seminal article and its offshoots, and it couldn't be timelier."
A distinguished philosopher offers his past and present thinking on the subject of moral obligations that members of affluent societies have to those living in extreme poverty. Read full book review >
WHO COOKED ADAM SMITH'S DINNER? by Katrine Marçal
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 6, 2016

"An exciting reassessment of the global economy that provocatively extends the frontiers of the feminist critique."
A Swedish political and economic writer shows why "feminism's best-kept secret is just how necessary a feminist perspective is in the search for a solution to our mainstream economic problems. Read full book review >
THE NORDIC THEORY OF EVERYTHING by Anu Partanen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 28, 2016

"An earnest, well-written work worth heeding, especially in our current toxic political climate."
A Finnish journalist offers a surprising theory of why Americans are neither currently upwardly mobile nor free. Read full book review >
CALLING THE SHOTS by Jennifer A. Reich
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 21, 2016

"Recent outbreaks of preventable diseases such as measles and whooping cough are focusing attention on this issue, making Reich's able contribution especially pertinent."
Despite warnings from the medical community and the outbreak of preventable diseases, some parents refuse to vaccinate their children. Here, a sociologist puts this group into a cultural context to examine their thinking. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 21, 2016

"Comprehensive data backs up a much-tested system that assists parents in getting their children to a calmer state of mind."
Helping your child destress. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Tantalizing perspectives on cultivating sharing, honesty, and cooperation via game theory."
Game theory strategies to handle everyday parental quandaries, especially the unpleasant variety. Read full book review >
Moving Beyond Duality by Dorothy I. Riddle
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 11, 2015

"A thoroughly researched argument for a nonbinary approach to understanding the world that's likely to find both fervent adherents and strong critics."
A manifesto and manual for readers looking to expand their capacities for kindness and mindfulness while also minimizing harm in the world at large. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >