Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 4)

WHITE TRASH by Nancy Isenberg
HISTORY
Released: June 21, 2016

"A riveting thesis supported by staggering research."
A rigorously researched study of the entrenched system of racial classification that dispels many myths about American national identity. Read full book review >
THIS IS WHERE YOU BELONG by Melody Warnick
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 21, 2016

"Well intended but unsatisfying."
Don't like where you live? Socialize. Volunteer. Make lists. Or you could just move. Read full book review >

THE WAY TO THE SPRING by Ben Ehrenreich
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 14, 2016

"Although Ehrenreich feels optimistic about the determination of Palestinians to resist, this visceral book, sorrowfully, portends no end to the horror."
A devastating portrait of unending turbulence in Palestine. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 14, 2016

"Uplifting, well-written story of personal courage and political empowerment."
The moving personal stories behind the landmark Supreme Court case Obergefell v. Hodges (2015), which established the right of same-sex couples to marry in all 50 states. Read full book review >
ALL STRANGERS ARE KIN by Zora O'Neill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"A valiant chronicle of the author's 'Year of Speaking Arabic Badly.'"
Returning to study Arabic less formally than as a college student led the author to travel through the Arab world. Read full book review >

THE BUTLER'S CHILD by Lewis M. Steel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"An articulate, emotionally moving chronicle of a life informed by racial unrest and elevated with dutiful humanitarianism."
A white man borne of privilege dedicates his life to the defense of civil rights. Read full book review >
INVISIBLE INFLUENCE by Jonah Berger
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 14, 2016

"Of particular interest to those selling messages of various stripes—marketers, advertisers, etc."
If Johnny told you to jump off a cliff, would you do it? If you're susceptible, like most people, to garden-variety social influence, then the answer is likely to be yes. Read full book review >
INVISIBLE MAN, GOT THE WHOLE WORLD WATCHING by Mychal Denzel Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Realizing that he has more questions than answers, Smith cautiously sketches a useful blueprint for radical and intersectional politics in a country where a black child can grow up to be president but where living while black is still dangerous."
As black men are cut down by the police and self-appointed vigilantes, an activist wrestles with competing claims—from his family and community, his historically black university, the media, and white America—on his blackness and how it is to be lived. Read full book review >
EXONEREE DIARIES by Alison Flowers
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A thoroughly researched, provocative book of justice gone wrong."
Chicago journalist Flowers goes deep into the cases of three innocent men and a woman serving at least a decade in prison for crimes they never committed. Read full book review >
THE LYNCHING by Laurence Leamer
HISTORY
Released: June 7, 2016

"An engrossing true-crime narrative and a pertinent reminder of the consequences of organized hatred."
A powerful account of how a Ku Klux Klan-sanctioned lynching in Mobile, Alabama, paved the way for legal victories against such hate groups. Read full book review >
THE FATE OF GENDER by Frank Browning
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A timely, thoughtful contribution to a much-debated issue."
A journalist and cultural critic investigates the "shifting terrain of gender." Read full book review >
THE INNER LIVES OF MARKETS by Ray Fisman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A thoughtful examination of the mechanics of our one-click world."
How economic theories power our market-driven lives. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Andrea Beaty
August 30, 2016

In Andrea Beaty and David Roberts’ new picture book Ada Twist, Scientist is like her classmates, builder Iggy and inventor Rosie: scientist Ada, a character of color, has a boundless imagination and has always been hopelessly curious. Why are there pointy things stuck to a rose? Why are there hairs growing inside your nose? When her house fills with a horrific, toe-curling smell, Ada knows it’s up to her to find the source. Not afraid of failure, she embarks on a fact-finding mission and conducts scientific experiments, all in the name of discovery. But this time, her experiments lead to even more stink and get her into trouble! Inspired by real-life makers such as Ada Lovelace and Marie Curie, Ada Twist, Scientist champions girl power and women scientists, and brings welcome diversity to picture books about girls in science. “Cool and stylish,” our reviewer writes. View video >