Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 5)

#ESOCIETY by David Barker
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 12, 2017

"A disturbing, affecting, and unforgettable work that remains upbeat while asking difficult questions about society."
A self-made British internet entrepreneur leaves a comfortable life to discover why so many people remain trapped in poverty and unemployment in this debut autobiography and manifesto. Read full book review >
AMERICAN HOOKUP by Lisa Wade
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"An eye-opening, conversation-starting examination of sex on the American college campus."
How and why American college students are engaging in nonintimate one-night stands. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"While writing about the first lady, most of these perceptive essayists are also writing about themselves and their country, showing the shifts in perception and possibility that she has helped inspire."
A collection of essays that genuflect before a first lady like no other. Read full book review >
THE NEW ODYSSEY by Patrick Kingsley
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A powerful firsthand account of a crisis that will continue to receive even more attention in the years to come."
Bravely following the refugee crisis from the Middle East to the European Union as it gains volume and urgency. Read full book review >
THE POWER OF MEANING by Emily Esfahani Smith
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A good choice for self-help seekers but not likely for others."
Common-sense suggestions on how to feel that life is worth living. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"While Ulrich creates an absorbing history of intimate lives, individuals' religious passions and acceptance of polygamy remain mysterious."
A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian investigates women's power and agency within the early Mormon community. Read full book review >
DEMOCRACY BETRAYED by William W. Keller
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Though without the rhetorical fire of Noam Chomsky or Naomi Klein, Keller makes a spirited case for preferring untrammeled freedom to managed and monitored safety."
"Liberty must always be privileged over security": a persuasive cri de coeur from a national security expert. Read full book review >
TALKING BACK, TALKING BLACK by John McWhorter
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A vibrant separation of an African-American vernacular tradition from the thickets of contemporary racial debate."
A compact, lively defense of the grammatical legitimacy of "Black English." Read full book review >
ECONOMISM by James Kwak
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Do the better angels of our nature demand double-digit profit? For a soft-path, smart refutation, Kwak's book is just the ticket."
A spry manifesto that dismantles the many suppositions of modern economic theory. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Accessible, highly effective methods for raising well-behaved children."
Advice for parents on handling toddlers to pre-tweens. Read full book review >
THE UNBANKING OF AMERICA by Lisa Servon
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Servon's approachable if somewhat academic study is an indictment of a financial structure bent on large returns at the expense of all else, but it also offers hope for ways around that ravenous system."
Banks seldom have much green money these days—and not many customers, either. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Though the story suffers somewhat in the telling, Starr is proud of his accomplishments, and he deserves to be."
One man's amazing accomplishment in founding a school amid a series of daunting challenges. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >