Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 5)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2015

"Schneiderhan leaves it to us to continue the journey these two began. His work, like theirs, is inspiring."
Schneiderhan's (Sociology/Univ. of Toronto) biographical comparison of Jane Addams (1860-1935) and Barack Obama illustrates how little has changed regarding the difficulties of community building. Read full book review >
THE DAD REPORT by Kevin Cook
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2015

"An enjoyable exploration of baseball, fatherhood, and how 'there's something special about the way families share the game.'"
Stories of fathers, their sons, and a way forward for the troubled game of baseball. Read full book review >

IN SEARCH OF THE MOVEMENT by Benjamin Hedin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 2015

"Thoughtful essays on this significant struggle, ongoing and continuous."
A journalistic foray into the work of unsung heroes in the civil rights struggle, then and now. Read full book review >
GEEK HERESY by Kentaro Toyama
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 26, 2015

"A white paper largely of interest to education theorists and aid specialists, with occasional asides for the Jaron Lanier/Nicholas Carr crowd."
A well-meaning but arid argument, by a former Microsoft executive and current MIT fellow, against the presumed Trojan horses of technology. Read full book review >
THE SOUL OF THE MARIONETTE by John Gray
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 19, 2015

"A brief, elliptical inquiry designed to raise more questions than anyone could answer."
Within the debate between Christian and atheist authors, here come the Gnostics. Read full book review >

THE WELL-TUNED BRAIN by Peter C. Whybrow
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 18, 2015

"'To reshape the future we need first to better understand and reshape ourselves,' writes Whybrow, and he offers a running start."
Whybrow (Director, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior/UCLA; American Mania: When More Is Not Enough, 2005) addresses significant issues related to the navigation toward a more meaningful life.Read full book review >
MISBEHAVING by Richard H. Thaler
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 18, 2015

"Readers with even the remotest interest in how the world really works will enjoy this work of the dismal science pleasingly, and even exuberantly, done."
The dean of behavioral economics—the study of how people behave in practice rather than in theory when it comes to dollars and cents—gives a spry account of his field. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 15, 2015

"A sometimes-distorted and sometimes-revealing portrait of a nightmarish United States."
White racism, slavery, and ongoing bigotry are to blame for the problems of black America, as well as the author's violent youth, according to this manifesto and accompanying memoir. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: May 13, 2015

"Leach strikes the right balance between a hard-nosed examination of the data and a compassionate, let's-make-this-work pragmatism. This will allow parents to shore up their children's stability when it may feel like everything else is crumbling down."
A guide to managing the fallout for children when parents choose to separate and divorce. Read full book review >
BREAKING THE MALE CODE by Robert Garfield
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 12, 2015

"Informative but hardly groundbreaking."
Methods for fostering and enhancing relationships between men. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2015

"A useful hands-on resource for development visionaries."
How an unlikely 15-year partnership between an American college graduate and a South African schoolteacher created a model nonprofit to help stabilize and educate children in the poorest townships. Read full book review >
THE HAPPINESS INDUSTRY by William Davies
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 12, 2015

"Skillfully written intellectual entertainment—prime fodder for postmodern psychologists and New-Age thinkers alike."
Durable reportage on governmental and commercial attempts to influence and propagate national well-being. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >