Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 5)

SPINSTER by Kate Bolick
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 21, 2015

"A sexy, eloquent, well-written and -researched study/memoir."
An Atlantic contributing editor's refreshingly bold and incisive account of how she came to celebrate her status as a single woman.Read full book review >
SPEAK NOW by Kenji Yoshino
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 21, 2015

"Yoshino claims that he was riveted by the 3,000-page trial transcript; his cogent, incisive narrative is equally captivating."
The story of a crucial trial to legitimize same-sex marriage. Read full book review >

HEADSCARVES AND HYMENS by Mona Eltahawy
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 21, 2015

"Although Eltahawy's passionate book contributes to the struggle against women's oppression, in the face of endemic misogyny, the potential for revolution seems chillingly remote."
The plight of women in the Middle East. Read full book review >
THE ROAD TO CHARACTER by David Brooks
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 21, 2015

"The author's sincere sermon—at times analytical, at times hortatory—remains a hopeful one."
New York Times columnist Brooks (The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character and Achievement, 2011, etc.) returns with another volume that walks the thin line between self-help and cultural criticism.Read full book review >
THE GREAT DIVIDE by Joseph E. Stiglitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 20, 2015

"Smart, sometimes-stinging prose that rejects the doctrines of strangled government and artificial austerity, doctrines that require us to 'pay a high economic price for our growing inequality and declining opportunity.'"
Nobel Prize-winning economist Stiglitz (The Price of Inequality, 2012, etc.) examines some of the macro dollars-and-cents issues that separate the haves from the have-nots—and money is just of them. Read full book review >

THE PROFESSOR IN THE CAGE by Jonathan Gottschall
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 14, 2015

"A personal history of violence that makes Norman Mailer look nuanced by comparison."
An English professor becomes a mixed martial arts cage fighter and then examines the history of human violence to justify the act. Read full book review >
COURSE CORRECTION by Ginny Gilder
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 14, 2015

"A passionate memoir of a woman rower who battled numerous odds in search of becoming the best in her sport."
How one woman overcame numerous obstacles to become an Olympic silver medalist in rowing. Read full book review >
COOL by Steven Quartz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 14, 2015

"Some points are more provocative than convincing, but the authors put a lively spin on an age-old argument."
A counterintuitive analysis suggesting that consumers instinctively know more about the value of the signals they are sending than their critics do. Read full book review >
TWO by Ann Patchett
edited by Ann Patchett, photographed by Melissa Ann Pinney
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 14, 2015

"A quietly ambitious multimedia production that doesn't quite live up to its potential."
Salt-of-the-earth collection of photos paired with loosely related essays by contemporary literary luminaries. Read full book review >
EVERY FATHER'S DAUGHTER by Margaret McMullan
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 9, 2015

"Consistently elucidating portraits."
A collection of essays on the father-daughter dynamic. Read full book review >
A LETTER TO MY MOM by Lisa Erspamer
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 7, 2015

"The sap flows heavily in this book about mothers who are heroes, role models, guardian angels and superwomen."
A collection for readers who admire or can relate to those who wholly revere their selfless, sainted mothers. Read full book review >
HAPPINESS by Frédéric Lenoir
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 7, 2015

"A brief though well-considered guide to a wide range of the many schools of thought regarding contentment, joy and happiness."
A philosopher's exploration of all the angles of happiness. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Beatriz Williams
June 23, 2015

In Beatriz Williams’ latest novel Tiny Little Thing, it’s the summer of 1966 and Christina Hardcastle—“Tiny” to her illustrious family—stands on the brink of a breathtaking future. Of the three Schuyler sisters, she’s the one raised to marry a man destined for leadership, and with her elegance and impeccable style, she presents a perfect camera-ready image in the dawning age of television politics. Together she and her husband, Frank, make the ultimate power couple: intelligent, rich, and impossibly attractive. It seems nothing can stop Frank from rising to national office, and he’s got his sights set on a senate seat in November. But as the season gets underway at the family estate on Cape Cod, three unwelcome visitors appear in Tiny’s perfect life. “A fascinating look at wealth, love, ambition, secrets, and what family members will and won’t do to protect each other,” our reviewer writes. View video >