Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 5)

THE CRUNK FEMINIST COLLECTION by Brittney C. Cooper
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A valuable record of the collective's contributions to a growing cultural awareness of feminist issues and criticism, particularly for women of color."
A collection of feminist essays on sex, gender, pop culture, politics, and friendship. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"A sharp analysis of an increasingly pressing problem, but Nichols falls short of proposing a satisfying solution."
Some fresh twists on a familiar theme: the dumbing down of America amid the defiant distrust of expertise. Read full book review >

A COLONY IN A NATION by Chris Hayes
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 2017

"A timely and impassioned argument for social justice."
Profound contrasts in policing and incarceration reveal disparate Americas. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 7, 2017

"Sunny, easy-to-follow self-help principles."
A series of practical steps for women to self-improve and help each other. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Solid research into the dilemmas regarding genetic screening and how it is used for fetuses and newborns."
When scientific ability and human desire coalesce into a potent tool that can profoundly change life. Read full book review >

THE KINGDOM OF HAPPINESS by Aimee Groth
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"An intriguing business/sociological chronicle with wider implications for modern corporate practices."
An investigation into the social experiments at the corporate headquarters of Zappos that raises some important questions about entrepreneurship, business management methods, and human values. Read full book review >
LIBERATING MINDS by Ellen Condliffe Lagemann
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A valuable arsenal of information for policymakers seeking prison reform in the present political climate."
A strong argument for expanding college-level study in the nation's prisons. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"You don't have to be a paranoiac to have enemies, and you don't need to be an outlaw to want to keep your personal information personal. Though with more than a whiff of conspiracy theory to it, Mitnick's book is a much-needed operating manual for the cyberage."
A highly useful handbook for how not to be seen—online, anyway. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"An illuminating look at what the brave new world of the future may hold."
A fresh look at the nature vs. nurture debate and the role of race in shaping intelligence and personality. Read full book review >
TEARS WE CANNOT STOP by Michael Eric Dyson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"The readership Dyson addresses may not fully be convinced, but it can hardly remain unmoved by his fiery prose."
The provocateur-scholar returns to the pulpit to deliver a hard-hitting sermon on the racial divide, directed specifically to a white congregation. Read full book review >
HOW MAY I HELP YOU? by Deepak Singh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An interesting look at a puzzling society—ours—from the point of view of a sympathetic but not uncritical outsider. Good reading for students of comparative cultures."
An immigrant's thoughtful account of what it means to make a new life in a strange land, in this case the South. Read full book review >
HOW TO KILL A CITY by Peter Moskowitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A harsh critic of the forces changing urban life paints a vivid and grim picture of the future of American cities."
A freelance journalist reveals the many evils of gentrification. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 14, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >