Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 6)

WHY BE JEWISH? by Edgar M. Bronfman
RELIGION
Released: March 22, 2016

"One man's personal call to laggard Jews to study, learn, and seek justice in a broken world. Readers of other persuasions may also profit from his insight into bits of Jewish thought and practice."
The late businessman and philanthropist answers his title's question with a last testament of sorts. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 22, 2016

"An imaginative take on teaching sure to inspire controversy."
An award-winning educator proposes radical changes. Read full book review >

THE CRIME OF ALL CRIMES by Nicole Rafter
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 22, 2016

"A comparative criminological approach to genocide, bloodless in pursuit of scientific inquiry and most appropriate for students and specialists."
A criminologist attempts to understand genocide and its etiology. Read full book review >
THE MIND CLUB by Daniel M. Wegner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 22, 2016

"Complex science lightly delivered; a pleasure for anyone comfortable with the thought that knowing others' minds will improve our own."
Do the dead have thoughts? The late Harvard psychology professor Wegner (The Illusion of Conscious Will, 2002, etc.), assisted by neuroscientist Gray (Mind Perception and Morality/Univ. of North Carolina), ponders that ethereal question and much more.Read full book review >
LIFE REIMAGINED by Barbara Bradley Hagerty
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 15, 2016

"For midlifers eager to 'create a new habit of mind,' Hagerty is a rousing cheerleader."
An upbeat look at the joys of middle age. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 15, 2016

"Thoughtful political theory for divisive times."
Longtime national affairs writer Woodard (American Nation: A History of Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America, 2011, etc.) builds on his previous analysis of the country's regional differences to focus on the conflict between individualism and collectivism that defines our national character.Read full book review >
The End of Democracy and Faith by Sean Wallace
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 15, 2016

"A sometimes-intriguing but often familiar treatise against the oppressive forces of democracy and religion."
In this debut work of political philosophy, Wallace argues that American society is hindered by the twin restraints of democracy and religion. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 12, 2016

"A lengthy manifesto for AMCAP that lays out a vision for an ascendant black America."
Rempson (Minority Access to Higher Education In N.Y. City, 1972) examines what he sees as the root causes of education and economic-mobility gaps that affect African-American males.Read full book review >
BULLIES by Alex Abramovich
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"A sharp, provocative memoir of an unlikely friendship."
A journalist's account of his friendship with a man who was not only president of a motorcycle group, but also the boy who bullied him during childhood. Read full book review >
WHEN WOMEN WIN by Ellen R. Malcolm
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"An inspiring portrait of a gutsy activist who produced a transformation in the political landscape."
The history of a defiant movement to elect women. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Although the author's well-delineated examples will ring outrageous to modern-day ears, she reminds us how much there is still to be achieved."
An elucidating study of landmark sex-discrimination cases waged in the wake of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Read full book review >
UNTIL WE ARE FREE by Shirin Ebadi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"The captivating and candid story of a woman who took on the Iranian government and survived, despite every attempt to make her fail."
A leading activist speaks out about inequality and injustices in Iran. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >