Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 6)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 3, 2016

"Spirited, witty, and ferociously incisive."
Bitch Media co-founder and creative director Zeisler (Feminism and Pop Culture, 2008) ruminates about how the current wave of feminism does not "challenge beliefs…so much as it offers nips and tucks."Read full book review >
ONEIDA by Ellen Wayland-Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A smartly contextualized tale of 'the tension between radical social critique and unapologetic accommodation...between communal harmony and individual striving.'"
A study of the unlikely origins of one of America's most recognizable brands. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: May 2, 2016

"A thoughtful historical study of the entrenched symbolism of a dreaded bridge in Mississippi, a landmark that 'fixed attention on Jim Crow's brutal excesses and unresolved legacies.'"
History of the most notorious sites in Mississippi for white-on-black violence, from 1918 to 1966. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2016

"A comprehensive analysis that lays the foundation for a discussion of necessary reforms and how they can be achieved."
Why the theories used to rationalize our beliefs in democracy are broken beyond repair and must be replaced. Read full book review >
ONE by Edward Mapplethorpe
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: May 1, 2016

"A wonderful portfolio of little monsters—or little angels, as you prefer."
A noted photographer turns from his previous interest in abstract portraiture to immediate, evocative studies of infants in their splendid innocence. Read full book review >

THE GREAT ACCELERATION by Robert Colvile
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2016

"A familiar argument but with interesting twists and a rosier forecast than many other books of social/technological criticism."
A well-paced consideration of the effects of technology on lives made ever busier by it—and whipping by in a whirlwind as a result. Read full book review >
OLD AGE by Michael Kinsley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 26, 2016

"An uneven but ultimately satisfying examination of the importance of 'long years of good health, not long years simply breathing in and out.'"
A short book about aging and baby boomers that mixes memoir and self-help. Read full book review >
THE NEW ARAB WARS by Marc Lynch
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 26, 2016

"An excellent, clear distillation of recent events in the Middle East."
A keen observer of the violent upheaval in the Middle East since the Arab Spring makes a strong assertion: there is no returning to the old autocratic ways. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 26, 2016

"Well written and full of firsthand insight—a good companion to weightier studies such as Timothy Miller's The 60s Communes (1999) and Arthur Kopecky's Leaving New Buffalo Commune (2006)."
If you can remember the '60s, you may have been there—but as a very young person, as this thoughtful history reveals. Read full book review >
Ghost in the Ranks by John J. Whelan
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 21, 2016

"A valuable work for anyone interested in gaining insight into the inner lives of troubled veterans."
A doctor who treats Canadian armed forces veterans with PTSD explores the causes and consequences of this devastating condition. Read full book review >
THE GUNNING OF AMERICA by Pamela Haag
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"A refreshingly unusual approach by an author admirably transparent about why she wrote the book and why she chose to avoid more traditional approaches."
An examination of the controversial realm of American gun culture through the perspective of gun manufacturers, with an emphasis on the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. Read full book review >
GHETTO by Mitchell Duneier
HISTORY
Released: April 19, 2016

"Americans did not create the ghetto, but in this well-documented study, we see clearly how those urban areas have come to embody so many of our shortcomings when it comes to matters of race."
How communities—especially in the United States—created, ostracized, and condemned the idea and reality of the ghetto. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >