Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 6)

THE CRUNK FEMINIST COLLECTION by Brittney C. Cooper
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A valuable record of the collective's contributions to a growing cultural awareness of feminist issues and criticism, particularly for women of color."
A collection of feminist essays on sex, gender, pop culture, politics, and friendship. Read full book review >
Technocracy in America by Parag Khanna
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A refreshingly original contribution to the ongoing analysis of the American political system."
A radical reappraisal of democracy and its decline in the United States. Read full book review >

THE EGYPTIANS by Jack Shenker
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A troubling yet highly engaging catch-up on the state of incomplete revolution in Egypt."
A sharp jab at the neoliberal economics adopted by Egypt over the last decades, which ultimately spurred grass-roots revolt. Read full book review >
RADICALIZATION by Farhad Khosrokhavar
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A timely, systematic breakdown of thee reasons for radicalization."
A French scholar delineates the attractions of violent extremism, specifically jihadi Islam. Read full book review >
SPARK by Angie Morgan
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A straightforward presentation that promotes values of conduct most of us would be proud to share."
Three former U.S. military officers advocate for transferring military leadership methods into the civilian business sector and beyond. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 20, 2016

"A sharp contribution to a significant topic that continues to generate heated discussion and debate."
A tour d'horizon of the historical relationship among race, racism, and mental illness. Read full book review >
THE LAST FAITH by Karmak Bagisbayev
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 8, 2016

"This ambitious book's unique structure offers some unusual, intriguing moments."
A writer tries to answer all of life's mysteries by having a Socratic dialogue with God in this debut philosophical work. Read full book review >
REST by Alex Soojung-Kim Pang
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A useful holiday gift at a time when New Year's resolutions will be on the agenda."
Why being a workaholic is not the key to greater productivity. Read full book review >
AGAINST EMPATHY by Paul Bloom
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"An intriguing counterattack to modern psychological cynicism."
The potential of empathy to lead to cruelty prompts Bloom (Psychology/Yale Univ.; Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil, 2013, etc.) to promote the function of compassion, which is informed by rational deliberation. Read full book review >
WHEN WE RISE by Cleve Jones
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"The frank and sometimes-graphic timeline of one gay man's life, his involvement in promoting gay rights, and the AIDS epidemic."
A key member of the San Francisco gay movement traces his life story. Read full book review >
ISLAND PEOPLE by Joshua Jelly-Schapiro
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"An eminently well-informed narrative."
A geographer's exuberant travel narrative about the nations and people of the Caribbean. Read full book review >
RULES FOR REVOLUTIONARIES by Becky Bond
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 18, 2016

"A lively update of and rejoinder to Saul Alinsky's Rules for Radicals, which, as this book very well may do, has long offered guidance to the right as well as the left."
Senior advisers to the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign leadership offer pointers on how to start the next movement—or perhaps continue the one they started. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >