Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 6)

AMORE by Roger Friedland
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Intelligent, thoughtful and well-researched, Friedland's book is not only a love letter to Rome, but also to his daughters and the members of their generation, for whose personal happiness he fears."
Cultural sociologist Friedland (Religious Studies and Sociology/Univ. of California, Santa Barbara; The Fellowship: The Untold Story of Frank Lloyd Wright and the Taliesin Fellowship, 2006, etc.) examines the life-changing "love lessons" he learned from the city of Rome. Read full book review >
EMPATHY by Roman Krznaric
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Useful advice that promotes a more contented, fulfilling lifestyle."
School of Life founder Krznaric (How Should We Live?: Great Ideas from the Past for Everyday Life, 2013, etc.) presents methods to increase a person's ability to look at situations through another's eyes.Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"Courageous and important but emotionally overdone."
An attorney and former journalist tells the dramatic story of her five-year undercover lesbian relationship with former Illinois Sen. Penny Severns. Read full book review >
THE PERFECT KILL by Robert Baer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"Fascinating reading from an expert."
A best-selling author and former CIA operative chronicles his experiences as an assassin while offering chilling insight into the fine art of political murder. Read full book review >
AT HOME IN EXILE by Alan Wolfe
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"A thought-provoking and optimistic look at global Judaism."
In defense of the Jewish diaspora. Read full book review >

SPEED LIMITS by Mark C. Taylor
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"A timely accompaniment to James Gleick's Faster (1999), this is a stimulating cautionary report for the digital age."
A philosopher and cultural critic ponders the durability of our fast-tracked, multitasked modern world. Read full book review >
WHO WE BE by Jeff Chang
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"An intriguing attempt at cutting through the dissonance of a series of changing cultural milieus."
Sprawling examination of how American society has responded to multiculturalism and demographic diversity. Read full book review >
FRAGRANT by Mandy Aftel
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 16, 2014

"Evocative, heady and overflowing with history and lore."
The history and mystery of the power of scent. Read full book review >
THROWN by Kerry Howley
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"An original fusion of topic and stance that will appeal to fans of NPR-style social investigations."
A philosophical examination of the maligned subculture of mixed martial arts "cage" fighting. Read full book review >
LOSING OUR WAY by Bob Herbert
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"In vivid anecdotes and moving portraits, Herbert humanizes the many problems he uncovers, and he clearly believes that Americans can, and will, band together to set the nation on a new course."
Former New York Times opinion columnist Herbert (Promises Betrayed: Waking Up from the American Dream, 2005) reports on his cross-country trip investigating the lives of the 99 percent. Read full book review >
GLASS JAW by Eric Dezenhall
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"More an illumination of the challenge than a pat solution."
Dezenhall (The Devil Himself, 2011, etc.) counsels beleaguered corporations on how to deal with bullying citizens and their social media attacks. Read full book review >
THE MEANING OF HUMAN EXISTENCE by Edward O. Wilson
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 6, 2014

"A little book with a big message, bound to produce discussion among scientists and discomfort in devout churchgoers."
An exploration of what it means to be human by the noted sociobiologist and naturalist, twice the winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >