Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 619)

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Love may be a many-splendored thing, but Baldwin's palette is too bland to capture its essence. (Drawings and photographs- -not seen)"
Sketchy vignettes of 38 relationships, some romantic and enduring and some not, the subtitle notwithstanding. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"While never encumbering his text with ponderous arguments about constitutionality or educational theory, Bates strikes with range and depth at the heart of these issues, crucial for educators and all concerned Americans."
A balanced, well-documented account of a battle recently fought by a handful of Tennessee fundamentalist parents against high-school textbooks. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A powerful emetic, worth a swallow."
Eight exhortatory essays (some of which appeared previously in the Atlantic Monthly, The Progressive, and elsewhere) by the Kentuckian fiction writer (Fidelity, 1992, etc.) and moral critic (What are People For?, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Of some interest to urban historians, but slow-going for general readers. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
As crammed with facts and figures as a rush-hour express is with passengers, this history of the New York subway system stalls time and again. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A fine complement to David Rieff's The Exile (p. 773). (Illustrations)"
A perceptive appreciation of Miami and what makes it tick, from a pair of sociologists who understand that anecdotal evidence can be as illuminating as statistical abstracts. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Engaging, down-to-earth advisories from a master of the game."
Winning, if demanding, prescriptions for success from one of the NBA's best coaches. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"An engrossing look at a shadowy area of American life—and the dark underbelly of the Reagan years. (Eight pages of photographs)"
A startling portrayal of life at the frayed edges of the American Dream—of drag shows, transvestite hustlers, teenage hookers, flophouses—and murder most foul. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

In dense, challenging, subtly argued philosophical essays, Bordo (Philosophy/LeMoyne College; The Flight to Objectivity, 1987- -not reviewed) offers a postmodern, poststructuralist feminist interpretation of the female body as a cultural construction in Western society, emphasizing eating disorders, reproductive issues, and the philosophical background. Read full book review >
THE FATAL EMBRACE by Benjamin Ginsberg
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Provocative and intriguing—but not without flaws."
A forceful study of the relationship between Jews and the state. Read full book review >
ONLY WORDS by Catharine A. MacKinnon
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Although MacKinnon's passionate conviction sometimes causes her ideas to elide and her logic to blur, the ideas are original and gripping, her references are wide-ranging, her legal logic is provocative—and her latest is must reading for anyone interested in either fairness or free speech."
Three passionate, intellectually fascinating essays, each arguing an aspect of the case that sexual words and pictures may by their nature be bannable, even though they may also be Constitutionally protected speech—by University of Michigan law professor and noted feminist legal scholar MacKinnon (Feminism Unmodified, 1987, etc). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A dense, credible, scholarly portrait of a missing piece of Jewish history. (Photographs)"
Fastidiously researched explanation for the emergence of Jewish women as radicals. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

A revealing and timely, if partisan, description of the strategies that gay men assume in order to function among heterosexuals in corporate life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >