Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 619)

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1993

"Many of the contributors are right or left of center but none are so conservative as to suggest that America is now colorblind."
Ninety years after W.E.B. DuBois posited the ``double- consciousness'' of African-Americans (``always measuring one's soul by the tape of the world that looks on in amused contempt and pity'' in a constant experience of ``twoness—an American, a Negro...two unreconciled strivings''), 18 African-American intellectuals offer thoughtful responses. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 1993

"An important and comprehensive reference for those involved in both gender battles and the fight for comprehensive child care."
A forceful overview of how what's perceived as good for the child changes as the culture and public-policy change—currently, Berry says, to the detriment of women. Read full book review >

THE ALCHEMY OF ILLNESS by Kat Duff
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 1993

"Readers accustomed to more straightforward accounts may find Duff's musings difficult to accept; still, her insights into common attitudes toward illness, and into the changes wrought in an individual by illness, are often enlightening."
From the sickbed of a woman of ``mystical temperament'': very personal, sometimes quirky, essays on illness, blending 20th-century psychology with holistic spirituality. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1993

"Not earth-shattering, but provocative and solid nonetheless: a compelling demonstration that the social consequences of ubiquitous testing are by no means positive. (Illustrations.)"
A well-informed analysis of pervasive testing in America today, with a substantial historical overview, from cultural anthropologist Hanson (University of Kansas). Read full book review >
PREPARING FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY by Paul Kennedy
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 1, 1993

"Somalia)—but only hard-core Cassandras will accept Kennedy's pessimism about nations' inability to mobilize the will or resources to change the planet."
After reading this gloomy exercise in futurology, even the most cockeyed optimists will feel justified in hiding under their bedcovers as the turn of the century approaches. Read full book review >

THE LAST OLD PLACE by Datus C. Proper
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 1, 1993

"Proper is no longer the private property of the rod-and-gun club."
A literary journey through Portugal from bottom to top, by a freelance writer with a reputation for erudite outdoor articles. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1993

"A valuable addition to AIDS literature—but also striking for what it reveals of today's artistic temperament as filtered through gay experience."
Honestly assessing their own responses and directions after testing HIV-positive, a number of prominent gay artists speak at length in interviews compiled by cultural critic Vaucher (The Los Angeles Times, The Village Voice, etc.). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1993

"The latest in a series (On the Law of Nations, 1990, etc.) demonstrating that Moynihan may be America's foremost literary politician—someone who can advance policy as cogently on the written page as on the stump."
A timely, informed plea from New York's senior US senator ``to make the world safe for and from ethnicity.'' Moynihan presented an early version of this material in November 1991 as a lecture at Oxford; he's updated that text with notes on such events as the ``ethnic cleansing'' occurring in Bosnia. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1993

"For buffs of early human life, a gift. (One hundred illustrations.)"
From the codirectors of Indiana University's Center for Research into the Anthropological Foundations of Technology: a weighty report on paleoanthropological technology—the study of our earliest ancestors and their use of tools. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 1, 1993

"An indelible account of a childhood lived on the edge, hallmarked by Paulsen's sinewy writing, purity of voice, and, especially, by his bedrock honesty."
The acclaimed children's author now writes a children's story for adults—a remarkably vivid, often shocking memoir of his growing up in the US and the Philippines circa WW II. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"Precious notions too slight and casual to carry us along."
A rambling and, ultimately, rather pointless retelling of ancient heroic tales, by a psychologist and author (Wisdom and the Senses, 1988, etc.) who tries without much success to connect the narratives to the daily realities of modern life. ``Myths are the prehistory of mankind,'' according to Erikson, who here traces our moral and psychic ancestry back to the sagas of the Greeks. Read full book review >
STROM THURMOND AND THE POLITICS OF SOUTHERN CHANGE by Nadine Cohodas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"An appealingly affectionate, warts-and-all portrait of a uniquely American figure. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Vivid, balanced account of the astonishing political evolution of the legendary segregationist who, through adroit adaptation, has retained his Senate seat for nearly four decades and become a distinguished Washington institution. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >