Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 619)

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 16, 1993

"But America is more than its fringe, and Codrescu, with his yen for the bohemian and the bizarre, never quite uncovers the land's expansive, mainstream heart. (Seventy-four b&w photographs—some seen)"
Romanian-born poet, professor (English/LSU), and NPR commentator Codrescu (The Hole in the Flag, 1991, etc.) drives from East Coast to West, nosing into the sort of lovably wacky Americana that's made the comparable dispatches of fellow wheelman/writer Charles Kuralt so popular. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 14, 1993

"A pioneering work."
A fascinating, accessible, and meticulous piece of scholarship, this study of changing conceptions of manhood breaks new ground in uncovering the internal struggles and shifting paradigms that have informed American men's understanding of themselves. Read full book review >

GENIE by Russ Rymer
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 14, 1993

"An eye-opening account of science gone awry and a life gone amiss."
A compelling account by journalist Rymer (The New Yorker, The New York Times, etc.) of a modern-day ``wild child'' so deprived of human contact that when she was found at age 13 she was virtually without language—making her a prize subject for scientific study. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 12, 1993

"The McMartin defendants, evidently treated unfairly by their accusers, have been ill-served once again."
A zealous denunciation of a bizarre child-abuse "witch hunt'' that's undermined by the authors' determination to spin some equally strange conspiracy theories of their own. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 12, 1993

"Not comprehensive, then, and at times overly reliant on diary excerpts—but informative, and valuable for its many glimpses of American interiors. (Illustrations—162—throughout)"
A fact-filled, copiously illustrated, revealing survey of Yankee life and households in an earlier time, complied by Boston- based curator Nylander (Director/Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities). Read full book review >

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 12, 1993

"A well-researched, clear presentation of a tough topic. (For an opposing view, see Rita Marker's Deadly Compassion, reviewed below.)"
``The advantages of deliberate death are too appealing to simply go away,'' asserts demographer Logue in this examination of the social forces that are driving us toward ``death control,'' especially for the old and frail. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 7, 1993

"A lively polemic that highlights some important issues for the 90's and that seems more or less in step with the beliefs of the man at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue."
A primer on how to move from the ``me generation'' (castigated by Etzioni in An Immodest Agenda, 1982) to the ``we generation.'' The text doubles as a manifesto for the Communitarian movement, which Etzioni helped found in 1991 and which he heavily promotes here as an antidote to many of the ills of the permissive 70's and 80's. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 7, 1993

"Still, for fans of the genre, a satisfying read."
An all-too-familiar memoir of cultural clash, misperceptions, and Western gall, told by a husband-and-wife team. Read full book review >
FROM YALE TO JAIL by David Dellinger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1993

"At times more rambling than riveting; still, overall, an open, inspiring chronicle, a personal history of more than half a century of dissent in America. (Photographs—not seen.)"
A thorough, thoughtful memoir of a lifetime of service to the principles of nonviolence. Read full book review >
RIDING THE WHITE HORSE HOME by Teresa Jordan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1993

"A sensitive, colorful series of contemplations, ultimately more impressionistic than cohesive but still a valuable rendering of family life and ranching in the American West. (Ten pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A heartfelt tribute to the Wyoming family ranch on which Jordan (Cowgirls, 1982) was raised, and to the hardy people who chose that difficult way of life. Read full book review >
I HAD A FATHER by Clark Blaise
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1993

"A compelling and unflaggingly intelligent autobiography from the author of two novels and four books of stories (including A North American Education), now director of the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa."
A personal memoir that for honesty, interest, and the steadiness of its inner searching equals the very best of its kind, bringing to mind, for example, books like Eva Hoffman's Lost in Translation. Read full book review >
REMEMBERING DENNY by Calvin Trillin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1993

"Perhaps more appropriate as one of Trillin's shorter New Yorker pieces—but, still, a fine meditation on one life's aborted promise, the crippling burden of anticipated success, and the mysteries of the human heart."
In a memoir on an uncharacteristically somber subject, Trillin (American Stories, 1991, etc.) traces the life of his college friend Roger ``Denny'' Hansen: Phi Beta Kappa, Rhodes Scholar, possessor of charm and good looks to spare—and, at age 55, a suicide victim. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >