Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 619)

HISTORY
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

When in 1923 the American writer Jean Toomer (1894-1967) published Cane, his famous lyric and experimental novel of black southern life, he received immediate recognition and acknowledgment for having produced an American literary masterpiece. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 31, 1993

"A disappointing scrapbook seemingly designed more for the author than the reader."
An uneven—and even self-indulgent—mÇlange of autobiography and reportage from a Jewish writer with deep southern roots. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 30, 1993

"Another forgotten woman deservedly brought to our attention- -but in a work that's more a catalogue of her considerable accomplishments than a full portrait."
A workmanlike biography from Miller (History/University of the Pacific) of leading socialist and antiwar activist Kate Richards O'Hare (1876-1948), who was imprisoned for her opposition to WW I. Shaped by her childhood in rural Kansas, O'Hare went on to become one of the leaders of America's Socialist Party. Read full book review >
A MOTHER'S ORDEAL by Steven W. Mosher
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 29, 1993

"A searing and candid look at a place where the state brutally intrudes into the most intimate parts of a woman's life. (First serial rights to Ladies' Home Journal)"
The compelling story of a young Chinese mother, giving a human face to the recent, chilling news accounts of how China has dramatically—and forcibly—decreased its birth rate. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: July 28, 1993

"In spite of the limited and slanted population sampling: a persuasively argued, sympathetic contribution to the growing literature of male liberation."
In a vivid, precise, but limited study, Gerson (Sociology/ N.Y.U.) extends to men the problems she explored in Hard Choices (1985), a study of women's dilemmas with family and career. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: July 14, 1993

"A sound though scattered exposition, then, and a good basis for future research."
Yalom (a researcher at Stanford's Institute for Women and Gender Studies; Maternity, Morality, and the Literature of Madness, 1985, etc.—not reviewed) offers a diffuse literary and feminist perspective on the 138 memoirs of the French Revolution written by women (out of a total of 1,502). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: July 14, 1993

"A balanced yet heartrending contribution to Holocaust literature."
In a vividly narrated reexamination of the historical record, Zuccotti (History/Barnard; Italians and the Holocaust, 1987) tells the horrifying story of the fate of French Jews at the hands of the Nazis and their Vichy collaborators. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: July 9, 1993

"A solid, convincing, and important contribution to the literature on masculinity, backed by case studies and distinguished by subtle analyses of Greek myths and of such moderns as Freud, Jung, Bly, and various feminist commentators."
Men and women are essentially different—historically, biologically, culturally, psychologically—according to Harvard Medical School psychiatrists Betcher (coauthor, The Seven Basic Quarrels of Marriage, 1991, etc.) and Pollack. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 9, 1993

"As sincere and compassionate as it is disorganized—but of merit for its insightful moments, and for its underlying faith in the ability of individuals to redeem themselves."
An eclectic accumulation of life experiences and sound advice for healthier living from Hammerschlag (a former longtime chief of psychiatry with the Indian Health Service; The Dancing Healers, 1989—not reviewed). Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 7, 1993

"Excellent for its historical summary of the tensions that women face in choosing between the creative and the caring life, but unconvincing for its typecasting."
A loving, if not very creative, analysis of the conflicts that arise when women try to foster both relationships and personal fulfillment. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: July 7, 1993

"Superficial but charming—in effect, a handbook on how to live as if one were a character in a 19th-century English novel."
An eccentric collection of brief essays (plus a glossary) that explains not the facts but the fictions of English life, as they were represented by writers such as Hardy, Trollope, Dickens, and Jane Austen. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 1, 1993

"Perhaps wise for its stress on transgenerational patterns, but too unsubtle to help people make sense of a problem that has infinite varieties and ramifications."
Here, Eaker-Weil (a family therapist and frequent TV talk-show guest), with the help of health-writer Winter (The Scientific Case against Smoking, 1980, etc.), tackles a thorny problem that visits about 70% of married couples these days: infidelity. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >