Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 621)

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 9, 1993

"Overly confessional and, at times, too focused on day-to-day details, but, still—with its appealing, steady warmth and sympathy for human foibles—a lively study of personal growth and cultural exchange."
In 1991, Fein, a documentary producer/screenwriter, traveled to the Southwest to research a TV series on contemporary American Indians. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 1993

"For a blue-blooded bodice-ripping morality tale, this isn't half bad. (Photos—not seen)"
A real-life Beauty and the Beast. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 3, 1993

"Anyone interested in menopause should turn instead to Gail Sheehy's The Silent Passage or Germaine Greer's The Change. (Illustrations)"
Given the title, as well as the neo-Castanedan spiritual odyssey that the author has undertaken in the past (Shakkai, 1992; The Woman of Wyrrd, 1990; etc.), Andrews's newest journey is ironically physical, even clinical, seeming to contradict her own thesis that a spiritual awakening compensates for the physical losses occasioned by menopause. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"An inspiring and compelling work. (Photographs—not seen)"
A scandal broke out a few years ago when American University president Berendzen was caught making sexually oriented phone calls to strangers. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Love may be a many-splendored thing, but Baldwin's palette is too bland to capture its essence. (Drawings and photographs- -not seen)"
Sketchy vignettes of 38 relationships, some romantic and enduring and some not, the subtitle notwithstanding. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"While never encumbering his text with ponderous arguments about constitutionality or educational theory, Bates strikes with range and depth at the heart of these issues, crucial for educators and all concerned Americans."
A balanced, well-documented account of a battle recently fought by a handful of Tennessee fundamentalist parents against high-school textbooks. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A powerful emetic, worth a swallow."
Eight exhortatory essays (some of which appeared previously in the Atlantic Monthly, The Progressive, and elsewhere) by the Kentuckian fiction writer (Fidelity, 1992, etc.) and moral critic (What are People For?, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Of some interest to urban historians, but slow-going for general readers. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
As crammed with facts and figures as a rush-hour express is with passengers, this history of the New York subway system stalls time and again. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A fine complement to David Rieff's The Exile (p. 773). (Illustrations)"
A perceptive appreciation of Miami and what makes it tick, from a pair of sociologists who understand that anecdotal evidence can be as illuminating as statistical abstracts. Read full book review >
THE WINNER WITHIN by Pat Riley
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Engaging, down-to-earth advisories from a master of the game."
Winning, if demanding, prescriptions for success from one of the NBA's best coaches. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"An engrossing look at a shadowy area of American life—and the dark underbelly of the Reagan years. (Eight pages of photographs)"
A startling portrayal of life at the frayed edges of the American Dream—of drag shows, transvestite hustlers, teenage hookers, flophouses—and murder most foul. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

In dense, challenging, subtly argued philosophical essays, Bordo (Philosophy/LeMoyne College; The Flight to Objectivity, 1987- -not reviewed) offers a postmodern, poststructuralist feminist interpretation of the female body as a cultural construction in Western society, emphasizing eating disorders, reproductive issues, and the philosophical background. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >