Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 621)

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 8, 1992

"Given a tolerance for lists and comfort with an approach that precludes subtlety, readers with histories of unhappy relationships may gain insight from this solid, well-organized advice."
The bestselling author of Secrets of Men Every Woman Should Know (1990) and How to Make Love All the Time (1987) now dissects bad love choices. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 7, 1992

"A revealing peek at a Gotham that exceeded our own in anything-goes sexual license and urban misery. (B&w photographs— not seen.)"
An original, impressively researched, and intriguing urban history—winner of the Allan Nevins Prize of the Society of American Historians—that explores the intersection of sex and the market in the Big Apple of the 19th century. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 4, 1992

"Good feelings galore, but next time, hold those maxims."
A Conservative rabbi (The Healer of Shattered Hearts, 1990) ponders the ways by which words link God and humans. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Too often, though, Gelman's self-absorbed approach gets in the way of the terrific stories he has to tell; for the real moxie, read Buchanan."
A tumultuous year (1989) in the life of a cub crime-reporter for New York Newsday. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A somber cautionary tale, well told, of human ambition, arrogance, and ignorance unchecked. (Forty illustrations—not seen.)"
An affecting story of an ugly instance of Western hubris, as told to writer Blume by the grandson of the man responsible for bringing Ota Benga, a pygmy eventually placed in a zoo, to America. Read full book review >

HOT AND BOTHERED by Wendy Dennis
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Move over, Nancy Friday."
Canadian journalist Dennis surveys the contemporary sexual landscape and finds it mostly a hostile desert with a few oases and many mirages. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Lively, intelligent, clarifying—a well-timed response that may catch the eye of Susan Faludi's, if not Bly's, readers."
Twenty stimulating, often passionate essays by feminists whose styles vary remarkably but whose message remains the same—that most forms of the current 'men's movement' reinforce patriarchy and widen the gap between men and women just when, for the sake of our children, ourselves, and the environment, we most need to work together. 'Make no mistake about it,' Gloria Steinem writes in her foreword, 'women want a men's movement. Read full book review >
COMING OUT CONSERVATIVE by Marvin Liebman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"An absorbing, occasionally awkward book given resonance by the author's struggle with—and final acceptance of—his homosexuality. (Sixteen pages of photographs—not seen.)"
An eventful, stylish, sometimes painful memoir by right-wing agitator Liebman. Read full book review >
HUDDLE by Andrew H. Malcolm
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Well written and at times astute, but not what you'd expect from a writer nominated five times for a Pulitzer."
An odd entry from talented and usually trenchant New York Times reporter and columnist Malcolm (Someday, 1991, etc.)—a paean to high-school football and those who coach it, with nary a negative word for either. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Familiar examples and few new insights, but, still, a cogent and evenhanded summary of generally available information about the influence of TV on politicking. (Forty halftones, ten graphs—not seen.)"
An attempt to determine the extent to which TV has contributed to the manipulation of political campaigns—and what can be done about it; by Jamieson (Communication/Univ. of Penn.; Eloquence in an Electronic Age, 1988, etc.). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Lively capsule histories lend zest to each writer's empowering Paris years. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs- -not seen.)"
Lively survey of American writers in Paris from the liberation in 1944 through 1960, ending with the invasion of the Beats. Read full book review >
WITHIN TUSCANY by Matthew Spender
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

An expatriate British sculptor's eccentric view of his adopted home of Siena, Italy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >