Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 621)

AND THE BRIDGE IS LOVE by Faye Moskowitz
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"A slight book that would have been even more enjoyable without the crocodile tears."
Short-story writer Moskowitz (Whoever Finds This: I Love You, 1988) entertainingly but mawkishly divulges a few secrets from a seemingly endless font of family lore. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Bound for controversy, this study admirably attempts to cross from the academy to popular culture, but theory here acts less as a window onto cultural evolution than as a screen drawing attention its own overwrought, repetitive pattern."
An elaborate theory by Garber (English/Harvard Univ.), insisting that the transvestite is at the elusive heart of Western culture. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"An admirable study of a significant precursor to the Civil War, with specific details providing a springboard to broader treatment of the issues and tensions of the time."
A wide-ranging, fascinating investigation by Slaughter (History/Rutgers) into the social and racial circumstances surrounding the Christiana Riot of 1851, in which runaway slaves stood up to the master who tracked them down and killed him. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"A first-rate study that reaches far beyond its ostensible subject to give a textured, gritty profile of New York past and present."
A New York Newsday columnist with a novelist's eye and fine sense of pacing explores the world of the N.Y.C. subway—in a timely account that is not only about the city's transit system but also about its people and its soul. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Her flaw: excessive quoting of scholars who don't write as well as she does, illustrating merely that she has done her homework. (Photographs of quilts.)"
The title of this collection of essays (some delivered as lectures at Oxford in 1989) refers to a quilting pattern—the image, as Showalter (English/Princeton; Sexual Anarchy, 1990, etc.) explains, that best describes women's literature in America: its communal and ritual nature, its continuity, its diversity, its history as a domestic art that lapsed into disrepute before being resurrected into a high art in the 60's. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Brilliant reportage, with all the details in place—a stunning debut."
The Pulitzer-winning journalist (The Wall Street Journal, Ms., The Miami Herald) explores the real status of American women in the 90's in this powerful and long-overdue myth-buster—an instant classic and a valuable companion to Paula Kamen's Feminist Fatale (reviewed below). Read full book review >
BLOOD LUST by Carol Page
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Oct. 31, 1991

"Vampire's Rights'' without draining too much out of us."
A survey of honest-to-goodness human bloodsuckers that manages to buffer sensationalism with sympathy. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 29, 1991

"Though giving short shrift to the secular viewpoint, Hunter still provides an informative look at America's ambiguous spiritual character."
America's ``identity'' is seen as a history of religious strife in this probing yet somewhat slanted study. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

"Ambitious and often penetrating, a laudable effort to explain the origins of, and restore balance to, current psychoanalytic debate. (For a complementary study of early male successors to Freud, see Phyllis Grosskurth's The Secret Ring, p. 1134.) (Photographs.)"
A notable, if occasionally impenetrable, attempt to trace the shift of psychoanalysis from a patriarchal to a matriarchal emphasis by analyzing the lives and works of the most prominent female successors to Freud. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

"A powerful companion to Nicholas Lemann's The Promised Land (p. 32) and Kevin Phillips's The Politics of Rich and Poor (1990) in detailing the racial and class tensions that are rending America's social fabric and poisoning its body politic."
An incisive analysis from Washington Post journalist Edsall (The New Politics of Inequality, 1984) of the political equivalent of a continental drift: the electoral realignment in which Republicans have won the White House five out of the last six times since 1964. Read full book review >
A SMALL COUNTRY LIVING GOES ON by Jeanine McMullen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

"Even if you don't know a whistle stick from a thistle stick, you'll find this one glows. (Eight pages of full-color illustrations.)"
``It is spring again in the valley,'' and for BBC radio host McMullen, time for further vibrant episodes in her personal and professional quest for the breadth of country lore. ``Little has changed but much has happened'' since My Small Country Living (1984) and Wing in the Ash Tree (1988) were published. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 28, 1991

A witty, tightly written, and well-integrated look at our eternal struggles between order and chaos and the need to find a practical medium. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >