Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 621)

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 30, 1991

"Excellent and unusual."
Steering clear of propaganda, Gorkin (Border Kibbutz, 1971), an American psychologist living in Jerusalem, presents a refreshingly balanced portrait of a Palestinian family in Israel. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 30, 1991

"In tight, lean prose, Hofvendahl writes evocatively of courage, hope, and the essential decency of ordinary people: in all, a gritty picture of desperate Depression days when uncounted thousands left home to seek a more hopeful life somewhere beyond the horizon."
Absorbing sequel to Hofvendahl's Hard on the Wind (1983), which detailed the author's sea-faring adventures at age 15. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 30, 1991

"Hopscotch organization and choppy prose don't help Vankin's brief, but, thorough and enthusiastic, it still offers enjoyably wild, sometimes challenging, fare for anyone who wonders who really rules the roost."
A paranoid's full plate as Vankin, news editor of Metro, a California "alternative weekly newspaper,'' tromps through every conspiracy theory you've ever heard of—and then some. Read full book review >
MADAM VALENTINO by Michael Morris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 26, 1991

"A questing, creative woman far ahead of her time—and truly exotic."
Well-done life of Rudolph Valentino's wife, a woman of boundless gifts, by art historian Morris (St. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 23, 1991

A scholarly yet charming compilation of distinctly feminine Native American legends—a continuation of the explorations that Allen (English/UCLA) began in The Sacred Hoop (1986) and Spider Woman's Granddaughters (a 1990 American Book Award). Read full book review >

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 23, 1991

"Overall, a stimulating collection and much food for thought, which one hopes will generate even more current updates and action."
The message here could be summed up as: You've come a long way, baby, but you've still got a long way to go. Read full book review >
TALES FROM THE AMERICAN FRONTIER by Richard Erdoes
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 20, 1991

"Meant to be a definitive collection but more often a derivative effort, unable to claim consistently either authenticity or a compelling originality. (B&w illustrations—not seen.)"
Homespun yarns and tall tales ``edited, told, and retold'' by Erdoes (co-editor, American Indian Myths and Legends, 1984, etc.) in a problematic compilation of the legends that arose from the taming of the American wilderness. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 20, 1991

"Warm and full of good spirits. (Twenty-four b&w photographs- -not seen.)"
Scatman Crothers offers Haskins one of the liveliest of the writer's 50 or so books (Richard Pryor, Mr. Bojangles, Queen of the Blues: The Story of Dinah Washington, etc.). Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 18, 1991

"An appeal for men's liberation that speaks to both sexes."
Social psychologist Hornstein (Psychology/Columbia; Managerial Courage, 1986) looks at the inappropriate expectations that men suffering from the ``man-servant syndrome'' have of themselves and of women, and how these affect their relationships. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 17, 1991

"A revealing glimpse or 19th-century Bostonian society, written by an intelligent and perceptive woman who's not afraid to question either herself or her world."
The thoughtful diary of an upper-crust Bostonian woman, written between the years 1844 and 1904. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 17, 1991

"A superb study that does much to bring recent Latin American history into sharp focus while at the same time illuminating just what it is that allows societies—wherever they may be—to accept, and sometimes embrace, violence."
Rosenberg, a MacArthur ``genius''-award journalist with a strong sense of narrative, looks far beyond the usual lurid accounts of violence in Latin America to write a personalized book that digs down deeply into the continent's psyche. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 16, 1991

"Still, there's much food for thought here—more than enough to sate human-potential devotees and to provide tantalizing tidbits for everyone else."
Running the gamut from Anglicanism to Zen, psychologist Anderson and consultant Hopkins present an uncritical examination of uniquely feminine aspects of faith. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >