Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 622)

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 1, 1993

"Still, a somewhat useful introduction to men's issues for those who prefer sloganeering psychologisms to the literary allusions of Bly."
Allen (director of the Texas Men's Institute) and Robinson (a freelance writer) show how the stereotypes men are raised with, as well as the allegedly dysfunctional parents who raise them, produce emotional cripples—and how talk-therapy fails them while the new rituals associated with Robert Bly will free them. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1993

"A collection that raises questions not so much about pairing or even creativity, but rather about how people living such chaotic lives function at all—and about why those who enjoy their art should care about their sexual logistics."
Essentially gossip—in spite of the trendy title—in these 13 essays by various authors on the influence that sexually paired writers or artists have on each other. Read full book review >

LOVE MATCH by Sandra Faulkner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1993

"Numerous questions go begging in the emotion-laden, self- serving text—making this hardly the work by which to judge Navratilova, the pair's relationship, or, for that matter, Nelson herself. (Illustrations)"
Former Texas beauty-queen Nelson tells—as written by sociologist Faulkner—of her eight-year affair with tennis great Martina Navratilova, as well as of the pair's litigious breakup and eventual out-of-court settlement. Read full book review >
THE FIFTIES by David Halberstam
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1993

"Compulsively readable, with familiar events and people grown fresh in the telling."
In The Best and the Brightest, The Powers That Be, and The Reckoning, Halberstam proved that he can master intimidating subjects with aplomb—and in this massive tome on a convulsive decade in American life, he meets with equal success. Read full book review >
THE WISH FOR KINGS by Lewis H. Lapham
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1993

"Eloquent, piercingly intelligent essays crying out against America's Orwellian future."
The editor of Harper's and author of Imperial Masquerade (1990), etc., reaches the top of his form in five distinguished essays arguing that too few Americans any longer care or know enough to protect and nurture democratic institutions. ``[The] habits of liberty have fallen into disuse,'' writes Lapham, ``and the promise of democracy no longer inspires or exalts a majority of the people lucky enough to have been born under its star.'' America has devolved into an oligarchy, the argument begins—an argument buttressed with facts, figures, and observations—and the nation's collective frame of mind has changed as well over the past 30 years from that of ``democrat'' to that of ``courtier'': from a citizenry that understands government to be what the governed make of it to a citizenry that passively and obsequiously seeks favors and dispensations from the high and unresponsive powers that be. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1993

"An important, well-documented study that deserves attention."
A forceful analysis of attempts to deny the Nazi Holocaust. Read full book review >
THE PEOPLE IN THE PLAYGROUND by Iona Opie
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 1, 1993

"Unlike the 1992 reissue of Opie's I Saw Esau, written with her late husband, Peter, this has no colorful Maurice Sendak illustrations interpreting the scene—but the text is nonetheless appealing for its heartening picture of children at play. (Two b&w plates)"
Down in the schoolyard, as Opie (The Classic Fairy Tales, 1974, etc.) presents her impressions of exuberant playground life during the English equivalent of recess. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 1, 1993

Best known as the ``pioneer of outing'' (identifying homosexuals in public life), gay activist-journalist Signorile (a columnist for The Advocate) offers no revelations in this angry memoir. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1993

"Seymour has captured that life splendidly. (Photographs)"
Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938), benefactor to and social catalyst of the Bloomsbury Group, has found in Seymour (Ring of Conspirators, 1989, etc.) a sharp eye and fine sense of irony to tell, for the first time, her side of the story (her memoirs, which appeared shortly after her death, were edited by her husband)—and it's an amazing one, including nearly every artist and writer in early 20th-century England. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 1, 1993

"More effective as an aid to understanding one's father than as a manual on becoming a better father, and more appropriate for men with sons than for those with daughters."
Before a man can be a good father, he must come to terms with his own father, contends Shapiro (Counseling Psychology/Santa Clara University; When Men are Pregnant, 1987- -not reviewed) in this earnest look at the psychology of fathering. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 31, 1993

Big news in the Little House. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: May 31, 1993

"Long on personal anecdote but short on substantive analysis, and gushing with feel-good fixes from a seemingly bottomless reservoir; still, a witty, well-meaning consideration of a serious social problem."
Atlanta psychiatrist Pittman (Private Lies, 1989) returns with an engaging, if not always convincing, assessment of the causes and cures of masculine inadequacy in America today. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >