Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 622)

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: July 9, 1993

"A solid, convincing, and important contribution to the literature on masculinity, backed by case studies and distinguished by subtle analyses of Greek myths and of such moderns as Freud, Jung, Bly, and various feminist commentators."
Men and women are essentially different—historically, biologically, culturally, psychologically—according to Harvard Medical School psychiatrists Betcher (coauthor, The Seven Basic Quarrels of Marriage, 1991, etc.) and Pollack. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 9, 1993

"As sincere and compassionate as it is disorganized—but of merit for its insightful moments, and for its underlying faith in the ability of individuals to redeem themselves."
An eclectic accumulation of life experiences and sound advice for healthier living from Hammerschlag (a former longtime chief of psychiatry with the Indian Health Service; The Dancing Healers, 1989—not reviewed). Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 7, 1993

"Excellent for its historical summary of the tensions that women face in choosing between the creative and the caring life, but unconvincing for its typecasting."
A loving, if not very creative, analysis of the conflicts that arise when women try to foster both relationships and personal fulfillment. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: July 7, 1993

"Superficial but charming—in effect, a handbook on how to live as if one were a character in a 19th-century English novel."
An eccentric collection of brief essays (plus a glossary) that explains not the facts but the fictions of English life, as they were represented by writers such as Hardy, Trollope, Dickens, and Jane Austen. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 1, 1993

"Perhaps wise for its stress on transgenerational patterns, but too unsubtle to help people make sense of a problem that has infinite varieties and ramifications."
Here, Eaker-Weil (a family therapist and frequent TV talk-show guest), with the help of health-writer Winter (The Scientific Case against Smoking, 1980, etc.), tackles a thorny problem that visits about 70% of married couples these days: infidelity. Read full book review >

ONCE UPON A TIME by Harry N. MacLean
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1993

"A riveting, thought-provoking look at a disturbing case. (Photographs—not seen)"
MacLean won an Edgar for In Broad Daylight (1988), which covered the case of a small-town bully shot dead in front of a crowd of locals who ``saw nothing.'' Here, he takes on the equally controversial case of George Franklin, a Californian found guilty of murder 20 years after the fact, the conviction resting almost entirely on his daughter's belated memory (which surfaced in 1989) of having witnessed the killing of her then- best friend, eight-year-old Susan Nason. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 1, 1993

"Sincere, but offering little comfort to families with disturbed children and, probably, little in the way of realistic solutions."
An anecdotal indictment of the system that treats children with mental-health problems, as well as an unpersuasive call for a new order. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: July 1, 1993

A coherent, perceptive appraisal of Japan, from a former official of its vaunted Ministry of International Trade and Industry. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: July 1, 1993

"A fascinating and factual introduction to the history of domestic life. (Illustrations)"
The concluding volume of Stone's excellent trilogy on marriage in early modern England (Uncertain Unions, 1992; Road to Divorce, 1990). Read full book review >
BECOMING BROTHERS by Howard Waskow
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: July 1, 1993

"Despite enduring differences, the Waskows offer an appealing human drama in writing themselves back to fraternity."
Two brothers—one a family therapist (Howard), the other head of the Center for Jewish Renewal in Philadelphia and author of These Holy Sparks, 1983, etc. (Arthur)—come to terms with their past and present relationship. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1993

"A frank, well-founded assessment not only of personalities but also of agendas and the dynamics of power in the top tier of black America at midcentury."
Scrupulously fair and intellectually astute, Janken's (African-American Studies/Univ. of North Carolina) portrait of a lesser-known member of the black scholarly elite in the mid-20th century provides a valuable look at the man, as well as at his milieu. Read full book review >
IN EXTREMIS by Deborah Baker
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: July 1, 1993

"She was, Baker says in this first full-length biography, offended by the moral ambiguity of Graves's The White Goddess—which she herself inspired. (Eight page of b&w photographs)"
In her long and eventful life, Laura Riding (1901-91) played, according to Baker (Making a Farm, 1981, etc.—not reviewed), the roles of goddess, witch, poet, editor, critic, mistress, collaborator, inspiration, demon, and recluse. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >