Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 622)

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Readers may prefer to wait for Randy Shilts's upcoming book on the same general subject. (Sixteen pages of b&w photos—not seen.)"
A controversial subject—the Defense Department ban on homosexuals in the armed forces—viewed from a highly personal perspective by a young man forced to resign from the US Naval Academy when he revealed his sexual orientation. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A curious but irresistible mix of soulful sincerity and glitter-sleaze that could sell through the roof."
Somers continues the campaign against child abuse that she began with her forceful autobiography, Keeping Secrets (1987). Read full book review >

FOR THE LOVE OF A CHILD by Betty Mahmoody
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A dramatic story of personal courage combined with an eloquent plea for greater protection of the rights of the world's most vulnerable citizens."
Mahmoody's latest is part autobiographical sequel to her bestselling Not Without My Daughter (1987), part collection of stories of other parents who have suffered the international abduction of their children, and part survey of the laws currently affecting these parents and children. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Unique and important in recent addiction literature: a very fine achievement."
Brilliant and terrifying evocation of the crack monster devouring Washington, D.C., coupled with addicts' biographies. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A highly readable study that probes the unprecedented scarring and healing of some of this century's most remarkable victims."
The first book-length study to document and analyze the ordeals and successes of immigrant Holocaust survivors. Read full book review >

THE BRIDE OF THE WIND by Susanne Keegan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A classy woman—even as an old fatty hooked on benedictine. (Eight pages of photographs—not seen.)"
Steadily intelligent, musically aware, sympathetic but objective life of the wife and goddess of Gustav Mahler, architect Walter Gropius, novelist Franz Werfel, and a handful of geniuses who loved her unstintedly. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"And you would be right."
The art of curve-fitting is elevated to high science in this curious collection of data compiled by a physicist/management- science-consultant living in Geneva. Read full book review >
THE FORGOTTEN AMERICANS by John E. Schwarz
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A heartfelt and persuasively documented reminder that all isn't well at home."
An arresting appraisal of America's working poor. Read full book review >
STEERED BY THE FALLING STARS by Daniel Spurr
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

Spurr, a former Cruising World editor, sets sail aboard a 33- foot fiberglass boat on a yearlong cruise of the Intercoastal Waterway that becomes a voyage of self-discovery. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Matthews covers a lot of ground here, but her extensive sources suggest the derivative nature of her argument. (Twenty-five halftones.)"
Having traced the decline of domestic woman in ``Just a Housewife'' (1987), Matthews (Beatrice Bain Research Group/UC at Berkeley) now explores less-than-successfully the gradual redemption of public woman in America from Colonial times to 1970. Read full book review >
MEGATRENDS FOR WOMEN by Patricia Aburdene
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

The wife/husband team responsible for Megatrends 2000 (1989) and Re-Inventing the Corporation (1985) furnishes another slick set of socioeconomic forecasts. Read full book review >
THE UNCERTAINTY OF EVERYDAY LIFE 1915-1945 by Harvey Green
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Aug. 26, 1992

"Very special, perhaps the most vital book in this valuable series. (Forty pages of b&w photos—not seen.)"
Excellent fifth volume in the Everyday Life in America series (Victorian America, by Thomas J. Schlereth, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >