Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 623)

KEEPER OF THE MOON by Tim McLaurin
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 11, 1991

"A powerful work—and a welcome record of a rapidly fading way of life."
A brush with death causes southern novelist McLaurin (Woodrow's Trumpet, 1989; The Acorn Plan, 1988) to reflect, with unflinching honesty and seductive, unsentimental passion, on what his North Carolina heritage has meant to him. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 4, 1991

"Survival Tactics,'' with explicit suggestions for rape victims on coping with bureaucracy, delays, and harassment."
Violent physical rape is horrifying and the psychic trauma lingers. Read full book review >

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 4, 1991

"It won't be, and never was, anything like Ozzie and Harriet."
An enlightening and essentially optimistic look at American families and the seismic cultural shocks that have wrought profound changes in them during the past century. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Brisk, responsible, and wide-ranging work that goes at least part of the way in laying some nuclear secrets bare."
Eye-opening and evenhanded report by two AP journalists on the history of the nuclear-weapons industry in the Southwest and its effects on its employees and neighbors. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Davis's levelheaded analysis of how and why some feminist efforts succeed and some fail should provide an invaluable source of information and inspiration for many."
Susan Faludi's Backlash (p. 1133) and Paula Kamen's Feminist Fatale (p. 1137) sounded the alarm: Feminism in America is in trouble. Read full book review >

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Friday project."
Oh, that bathtub faucet. Read full book review >
CELIA, A SLAVE by Melton A. McLaurin
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"A straightforward and compelling account of one small historical incident that helps to illustrate the complex issues facing pre-Civil War America."
Both a well-told historical narrative about a slave girl sexually exploited by her master, whom she later kills, and a thoughtful examination of the moral tensions that strained the fabric of the antebellum South. Read full book review >
AND THE BRIDGE IS LOVE by Faye Moskowitz
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"A slight book that would have been even more enjoyable without the crocodile tears."
Short-story writer Moskowitz (Whoever Finds This: I Love You, 1988) entertainingly but mawkishly divulges a few secrets from a seemingly endless font of family lore. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Bound for controversy, this study admirably attempts to cross from the academy to popular culture, but theory here acts less as a window onto cultural evolution than as a screen drawing attention its own overwrought, repetitive pattern."
An elaborate theory by Garber (English/Harvard Univ.), insisting that the transvestite is at the elusive heart of Western culture. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"An admirable study of a significant precursor to the Civil War, with specific details providing a springboard to broader treatment of the issues and tensions of the time."
A wide-ranging, fascinating investigation by Slaughter (History/Rutgers) into the social and racial circumstances surrounding the Christiana Riot of 1851, in which runaway slaves stood up to the master who tracked them down and killed him. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"A first-rate study that reaches far beyond its ostensible subject to give a textured, gritty profile of New York past and present."
A New York Newsday columnist with a novelist's eye and fine sense of pacing explores the world of the N.Y.C. subway—in a timely account that is not only about the city's transit system but also about its people and its soul. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Her flaw: excessive quoting of scholars who don't write as well as she does, illustrating merely that she has done her homework. (Photographs of quilts.)"
The title of this collection of essays (some delivered as lectures at Oxford in 1989) refers to a quilting pattern—the image, as Showalter (English/Princeton; Sexual Anarchy, 1990, etc.) explains, that best describes women's literature in America: its communal and ritual nature, its continuity, its diversity, its history as a domestic art that lapsed into disrepute before being resurrected into a high art in the 60's. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >