Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 623)

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 2, 1992

"Too valuable to be ignored, but too often testing the reader's patience."
Essays from the editor-in-chief of Ms., including: an interesting look back at the feminist wave she helped start 20 years ago; some fine partisan journalism; and some perfectly dreadful flights of fancy. Read full book review >
LATINOS by Earl Shorris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Wide-ranging, groundbreaking, opinionated, and very important."
Personal, impassioned overview of the fastest growing minority in the US. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Many will be convinced by her knowledgeable, persuasive, and entertaining discussion—and the more skeptical will find fascinating tidbits for thought along the way."
Fisher (The Sex Contract, 1981)—research associate at the American Museum of Natural History, former ``house anthropologist'' for The Today Show, and one of our best science-popularizers—may find a large readership for her subject here: the influence of evolutionary biology and genetics on sex, love, marriage, divorce, and today's family. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

Love/hate relationships between sisters in childhood may continue unresolved, affecting self-image and adult relationships- -so says journalist Mathias (The Washington Post, Family Circle, etc.), who here offers shallow exploration as well as gushy encouragement for estranged sisters to reconnect. ``Our parents die, our children leave, we can separate from our husbands or lovers, but a sister remains part of us....'' Sisters, Mathias says, are not bonded by genetics or—because each sister experiences the family in a different way—even by shared history, but rather ``by their gender, which is trained from early childhood to be sensitive to others.'' Mathias's observations, based on interviews with more than 75 women, are intended to encourage therapists to consider more than birth order in evaluating the influence of the sister relationship and to encourage sisters to get past lifelong grievances and to reaffirm their loving connection. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"The road to equality, paved with good intentions—and reams of barbed wire."
Contentious plea for boosting intelligence as the key to a classless society. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Has the feel of a magazine article padded out with term-paper material into a book."
How prejudices based on skin color (as well as hair texture and facial structure) affect the daily lives and life opportunities of blacks in their dealings with whites and—above all—with each other: A compilation of anecdotes with a familiar historical overview and mostly obvious conclusions. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"In the end, Taylor resembles a physician who uses the most sophisticated equipment to diagnose a patient's condition—and then prescribes bloodletting as the cure."
A stinging, but ultimately one-dimensional, polemic that calls for dismantling race-conscious government, educational, and business policies that, in this conservative's view, worsen the white-black relations they sought to better. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"A thoughtful, expansive appraisal of what market values may or may not be worth in the great ends of—and real business of living in—latter-day America."
A scholar's bold and brilliant, albeit detached, effort to determine the degree to which Americans can achieve self- realization (or secular redemption) in a nation whose primary values are economic. Read full book review >
TRIALS OF THE EARTH by Helen Dick Davis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 31, 1992

"A splendid and long overdue addition to the pioneering canon."
Life at the turn of the century in the lumber camps of the Mississippi Delta, as recalled by a woman pioneer who cooked for hundreds; raised a family; and, with humor and courage, overcame a host of daunting obstacles. Read full book review >
CATHOLIC GIRLS by Amber Coverdale Sumrall
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 29, 1992

"Perhaps—but this anthology will provoke more yawns than yelps."
Not, as the title suggests, about Catholic girlhood per se, but rather about girls and young women who rebel against their religious upbringing. Read full book review >
THE CHANGE by Germaine Greer
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 26, 1992

"Intensively researched, intelligently written, this erudite, literate work—a brilliant philosophical complement to Gail Sheehy's bestselling The Silent Passage (p. 381)—should inspire change in how we think about The Change."
It may be that menopause saw Greer (Daddy, We Hardly Knew You, 1989, etc.) coming and quaked, for surely the subject will never be quite the same again. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 26, 1992

"Insightful, poignant, and rife with honest revelations. (Photographs—32 pp.—not seen.)"
The story of a black Russian's life in pre-glasnost Russia, and of her quest to discover and connect with her American and African roots. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Marilu Henner
author of CHANGING NORMAL
April 26, 2016

After they’d been dating only a short while, and as they were falling in love, Marilu Henner and Michael Brown were hit with the ultimate bad news: Michael was diagnosed with cancer. Refusing traditional care, they pieced together a personal and holistic view on battling his cancer, all while forging an unbreakable bond. In this moving and informative book, Marilu pulls back the curtain on how they dealt with the blow. She relates her holistic perspective on health—including the superfoods, exercises, and immunotherapy they used to fight back—and why a diagnosis doesn’t have to be the end of romance or of a happy and fulfilling life. “An inspiring love story wrapped in a serious call for new ways to treat disease,” our reviewer writes. View video >