Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 623)

THE PEOPLE IN THE PLAYGROUND by Iona Opie
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 1, 1993

"Unlike the 1992 reissue of Opie's I Saw Esau, written with her late husband, Peter, this has no colorful Maurice Sendak illustrations interpreting the scene—but the text is nonetheless appealing for its heartening picture of children at play. (Two b&w plates)"
Down in the schoolyard, as Opie (The Classic Fairy Tales, 1974, etc.) presents her impressions of exuberant playground life during the English equivalent of recess. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 1, 1993

Best known as the ``pioneer of outing'' (identifying homosexuals in public life), gay activist-journalist Signorile (a columnist for The Advocate) offers no revelations in this angry memoir. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1993

"Seymour has captured that life splendidly. (Photographs)"
Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938), benefactor to and social catalyst of the Bloomsbury Group, has found in Seymour (Ring of Conspirators, 1989, etc.) a sharp eye and fine sense of irony to tell, for the first time, her side of the story (her memoirs, which appeared shortly after her death, were edited by her husband)—and it's an amazing one, including nearly every artist and writer in early 20th-century England. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 1, 1993

"More effective as an aid to understanding one's father than as a manual on becoming a better father, and more appropriate for men with sons than for those with daughters."
Before a man can be a good father, he must come to terms with his own father, contends Shapiro (Counseling Psychology/Santa Clara University; When Men are Pregnant, 1987- -not reviewed) in this earnest look at the psychology of fathering. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 31, 1993

Big news in the Little House. Read full book review >

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: May 31, 1993

"Long on personal anecdote but short on substantive analysis, and gushing with feel-good fixes from a seemingly bottomless reservoir; still, a witty, well-meaning consideration of a serious social problem."
Atlanta psychiatrist Pittman (Private Lies, 1989) returns with an engaging, if not always convincing, assessment of the causes and cures of masculine inadequacy in America today. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 31, 1993

"Brain candy, then, and none too convincing."
A brief for a new discipline known as ``evolutionary psychology''—as well as a pessimistic assessment of the human condition, based on the alleged biological sources of social customs in lemurs and other primates. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 30, 1993

"A Jungian coincidence?"
Shepherd became a biochemist in the 70's, married a fellow graduate student she'd known since high school, pursued a career in biotechnology, and eventually divorced. Read full book review >
A YEAR IN LAPLAND by Hugh Beach
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: May 27, 1993

"An enthusiastic report by a man in love with his subject, best read on a cold winter's night. (Twelve color, 43 b&w illustrations)"
In a lighthearted homage to a threatened way of life, an American anthropologist recalls his first year among the Saami reindeer herders of Lapland. Read full book review >
MEMPHIS AFTERNOONS by James Conaway
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 26, 1993

An affecting memoir that limns the sometimes bumpy journey to acceptance of one's people and the place they called home. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: May 26, 1993

"A thoughtful and sensitive description that provides a prespective so often lacking from more conventional accounts."
An unusual, engaging, and perceptive look at life in the Soviet Union in its final year of existence, by Hixson (History/University of Akron; George Kennan, 1989—not reviewed). Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 24, 1993

"An affecting memoir that lacks the probing and context to make it the revealing work about America's troubled race relations that it might have been. (Photographs)"
A sincere account of how Bates (The Pulitzer Prize, 1991), who's white, raised two adopted black daughters alongside two biological sons. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >