Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 625)

AMADOR by Fernando Savater
NON-FICTION
Released: June 7, 1994

"De Magistro,'' of whose style Savater's will remind the reader."
A sometimes touching but ultimately banal discourse by a father to his son, offering advice on how to get along in life. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 6, 1994

A delightful collection of essays on becoming a writer, by the author of Ordinary Time (1993), which draws from literature, feminism, psychoanalysis, and life experience. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: June 6, 1994

"But his effort is worthy, and his conclusions contain much sense."
This broad-brush essay starts from the premise that ``there can be too much freedom in life, and that too much freedom has a serious moral, social, and emotional price.'' Schwartz (Psychology/Swarthmore) is concerned with the darker side of the seemingly limitless choices of middle-class American life. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 6, 1994

"The very kind of pedantry that elicited Austen's most stinging satire, reproducing the whole petty and suffocating social network her fiction indicts."
Instead of the promised revelations from hitherto censored materials offering a more ``vibrant'' Jane Austen, Tucker assembles a reference guide to Austen's life, a genealogy of her relatives, friends, some people she never met at all, and gossip long since refuted. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 3, 1994

This exploration of the current state of feminist affairs is thought-provoking but confuses categories of feminism. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: June 2, 1994

An illuminating examination of modern egalitarian marriage by a sociologist at the University of Washington in Seattle. Read full book review >
BALSAMROOT by Mary Clearman Blew
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1994

"Sagebrush and sage."
As Blew (All But the Waltz, 1991) watches her long-idolized aunt Imogene slide into dementia, she wisely analyzes past and present to create a stronger self and a more honest future. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"The book has an air of tabloid TV, but the human drama here remains powerful."
Social worker Evans' gives a compelling account of a client's recovery of a childhood laced with physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. Read full book review >
SHOT IN THE HEART by Mikal Gilmore
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"Articulate, brave, and heartbreaking. (15 b&w photos, not seen) (First serial to Rolling Stone; film rights to Alan Pakula; Book-of-the-Month Club featured selection; Quality Paperback Book Club selection; author tour)"
In a narrative that holds all the morbid fascination of a bad car wreck, the kid brother of Gary Gilmore—immortalized in Norman Mailer's The Executioner's Song, he campaigned for his own death and became the first person to be executed in America after the death penalty was reinstated in the 1970s—details a sickening family history of violence, rage, and lies that spans several generations. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"A self-defeating project that bulldozes instead of informing."
This book's know-it-all attitude cancels out an interesting issue: the ``self-destructive chasm'' between what American women say they want and their actions. Read full book review >
GENDER AND DISCOURSE by Deborah Tannen
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"This may offer intrepid Tannen fans or academicians worthy bits of information and insight, but general readers are likely to find little reward in this dense tome."
In attempt to defend and expand upon her theories of miscommunication between men and women, sociolinguist Tannen provides the scholarly underpinnings of her 1990 bestseller, You Just Don't Understand. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"Bornstein's witty style, personal approach, and frankness open doors to questioning gender assumptions and boundaries."
A thoughtful challenge to gender ideology that continually asks difficult questions about identity, orientation, and desire. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >