Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 625)

EATING OUR HEARTS OUT by Lesléa Newman
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 1, 1993

"In the last of these qualities, at least, they can't touch the several well-known harrowing tales by slaves to alcohol and drugs."
Feminist writer Newman (Good Enough to Eat, 1986, etc.—not reviewed) put together this collection of original cries, complaints, and confessions on the belief that ``most of us [women] have, or at least at one time had, a voice inside us that nags at almost every meal: You shouldn't eat that.'' Lee Lynch, one of several lesbian contributors, maintains that ``there is probably not a lesbian in the world who would not, at the slightest sign of interest, tell you about her personal history with food.'' The ninety other anorexics, bulemics, overeaters, and other food- disordered women represented here—few if any of them accomplished writers—would seem to bear out these assertions with their lamentations about ups and downs and mostly losing battles against cake and chocolate and whatever high-fat confection might stuff up their empty and demanding selves. Read full book review >
LAWYERS AND THE AMERICAN DREAM by Stuart M. Speiser
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1993

"Speiser tells some absorbing tales of success in court, but his reduction of the American Dream to a quest for riches is unworthy, and his self-serving tribute to the plaintiff's bar will have readers shaking their heads and smiling."
In this age of lawyer-bashing, attorney/novelist Speiser (Superstock, 1982) offers an unusual—and shameless—paean to the plaintiff's bar—those lawyers who, in the author's view, fulfill the American Dream of righting wrongs while making themselves rich. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: April 1, 1993

"A very cloudy crystal ball."
Wuthnow (Social Sciences/Princeton), usually an elegant chronicler of social trends (Acts of Compassion, 1991, etc.), stumbles with this dull look at the future of the church. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1993

"Not every young woman born after the 60's will face motherhood thinking about such daunting questions, but those who do will find that Schwartz articulates their confusion well and with feeling. (First serial to Glamour and New Woman)"
Young women building careers, nurturing relationships, and toying with the idea of having babies will find their conflicts described empathetically and analyzed astutely here. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1993

"Two cheers for chat, one for content."
Novelist/essayist and professional bohemian Gold (Travels in San Francisco, 1989, etc.) surveys the past three or four decades of his wandering years. Read full book review >

MY MOTHER WORKED AND I TURNED OUT OKAY by Katherine Goldman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1993

"Celebrating the resilience of children and their parents: a cheerful antidote to those who rail against working mothers."
A lighthearted but not empty-headed look at adult children of working mothers. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1993

"A sobering and much needed call to action."
A compassionate, thoughtful analysis of an alarming and increasingly frequent phenomenon in our rapidly diversifying society. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1993

"A powerful salvo in the war over political correctness—and a ringing reaffirmation of the principles of free thought as conceived by Locke, John Stuart Mill, and others."
A compelling defense of free speech against its new enemies, who range from the mosques of Iran to the groves of American academe. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 1, 1993

"As in a good novel, these real-life characters elicit cheers and boos, sympathy and disdain—and greater understanding of the emotional minefield walked by new parents."
A remarkably absorbing series of stories about real couples dealing with pregnancy and baby's first year. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1993

"A positive—if too gimmicky—spin for those who think of themselves as victims. (Diagrams—not seen)"
A self-help volume for adult children of dysfunctional families that puts the emphasis on rising above adversity rather than on reliving the pain of abusive relationships. Read full book review >
DAILY FARE by Kathleen Aguero
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1993

Seventeen autobiographical essays of varying quality that address the authors' experiences ``outside''—as editor Aguero (Humanities/Pine Manor College) puts it—the ``dominant tradition'' of ``white, male, heterosexual, upper-class, Eurocentric'' culture. Read full book review >
THE UNMASKING by Kevin Flynn
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 29, 1993

"Overall, then, a torpid chronicle."
Sluggish, standard-model true-crime account of a multiple rapist who concealed his crimes for seven years while married and involved in a fundamentalist church. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Melissa Sweet
author of SOME WRITER!
September 26, 2016

“SOME PIG,” Charlotte the spider’s praise for Wilbur, is just one fondly remembered snippet from E. B. White’s Charlotte’s Web. In Some Writer!, two-time Caldecott Honor winner and 2014 Kirkus Prize finalist Melissa Sweet mixes White’s personal letters, photos, and family ephemera with her own exquisite artwork to tell his story, from his birth in 1899 to his death in 1985. Budding young writers will be fascinated and inspired by the journalist, New Yorker contributor, and children’s book author who loved words his whole life. This authorized tribute is the first fully illustrated biography of E. B. White and includes an afterword by Martha White, E. B. White's granddaughter. “Like Charlotte, Sweet spins a terrific story,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A masterful biography that will enchant young readers.” View video >