Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 625)

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 1993

"Bland conversations informed largely by the author's profeminist bias."
A pastiche of interviews with daughters of women who struggled individually and collectively as part of the women's movement of the 60's and 70's. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 1993

"Some heavy going in the inevitable discussions of the scientific evidence—but, on the whole, compelling and readable."
Sarasohn, a Washington-based journalist for Legal Times, turns her attention to the notorious case in which a team led by Nobel laureate David Baltimore (Physiology, 1975) published a scientific paper later exposed as being built on fabricated data. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 1993

"An evocative recollection of a community cruelly defined by race but sustained by loving strength and deep faith."
A lyrical recollection of a segregated Memphis childhood, rich in love and wisdom, that, unfortunately, peters out in typical Sixties-generation preoccupations. Read full book review >
TRANSFORMING A RAPE CULTURE by Emilie Buchwald
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 6, 1993

"An impressive collection on a subject that should be of wider interest and concern."
Well-edited, worthy compendium of writings about sex and violence in our culture. Read full book review >
KAFKA WAS THE RAGE by Anatole Broyard
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 6, 1993

"Vital criticism that—in these woebegone days especially—is wondrously to be valued."
Brilliant, funny, penetrating observations on life and culture in N.Y.C. after WW II from critic Broyard, who died of cancer in 1990 (Intoxicated by My Illness, 1992). ``Nineteen forty-six was a good time—perhaps the best time— in the twentieth century,'' writes Broyard, and the reader wishes that the critic were still here to write a dozen more books just like this wonderful one to explain further exactly what he means. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 5, 1993

Actually, on the evidence here, Krassner—founder/editor of The Realist and the most outrageous cultural critic of his era—no longer raves now that he's in his 60s. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A vivid diary of life on the family farm today. (Sixteen b&w photographs—not seen)"
A woman's journal of days on a central Missouri farm reveals a life of incredibly endless work—and of devotion to the land that amounts to modern-day pantheism. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A touching portrayal of the plight of women forced to give up their babies—although Jones's solution seems inadequately considered. (First serial to New Woman)"
Candid, often moving report on the experiences of some 70 women who gave up their babies for adoption. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Of some initial appeal to those who enjoy taking relationship quizzes—but unlikely to hold the interest of any but the truly—well, committed. (First serial to New Woman)"
A heavy dose of pop advice and sympathetic handholding for those whose anxieties about commitment are messing up their love lives. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Well-researched local history on a still timely issue: the effect of class and ethnicity on criminal justice. (Seven b&w illustrations)"
An intriguing account of a New England rush to judgment in the Jacksonian Era. Read full book review >
THE DECOMPOSITION OF SOCIOLOGY by Irving Louis Horowitz
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"No doubt Horowitz cares deeply about his field—but his scattershot indictments and pronouncements offer little by way of a specific plan of action, allowing sociology's crisis to lose ground to musings on the social sciences in general."
After four decades in the profession, Rutgers sociologist Horowitz (Daydreams and Nightmares, 1990, etc.) looks in horror at the ideological grave into which he says his discipline has fallen, and attempts to resurrect the corpse before it rots away. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

Kreidman, having inflamed the passions of men and women in Light Her Fire (1990) and Light His Fire (1989), now sets her sights on couples with children, advising them on how to keep love and lust alive amid the draining and humdrum duties of parenthood, jobs, and home management. ``Ten Second Kisses''; red light bulbs in the bedroom; quickies in the garage while you and your mate take out the garbage together; confidential envelopes sealed with heart stickers delivered to his office—these are the sort of incendiary suggestions that Kreidman proffers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >