Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 625)

THE FOUNTAIN OF AGE by Betty Friedan
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 9, 1993

A book that explodes the myths of aging—just as, 30 years ago, Friedan exploded the mirage of the contented housewife. Read full book review >
NEW YORK DAYS by Willie Morris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 9, 1993

"Morris's pride, hurt and otherwise, is on every page—but disappointingly little of the cautionary tale of literary power that shades his whole story breaks free and takes over, or is allowed to be fascinating. (First printing of 25,000)"
Morris (The Courting of Marcus Dupree, 1983, etc.), Mississippi-born, was barely 30 when, in 1963, he took the helm of Harper's magazine and changed it from a genteel and respectable cultural warhorse into a writer-driven journalistic whiz-bang, publishing Mailer and Halberstam and everyone else who was pushing journalism into more plastic realms. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 9, 1993

"Overly confessional and, at times, too focused on day-to-day details, but, still—with its appealing, steady warmth and sympathy for human foibles—a lively study of personal growth and cultural exchange."
In 1991, Fein, a documentary producer/screenwriter, traveled to the Southwest to research a TV series on contemporary American Indians. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 1993

"For a blue-blooded bodice-ripping morality tale, this isn't half bad. (Photos—not seen)"
A real-life Beauty and the Beast. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 3, 1993

"Anyone interested in menopause should turn instead to Gail Sheehy's The Silent Passage or Germaine Greer's The Change. (Illustrations)"
Given the title, as well as the neo-Castanedan spiritual odyssey that the author has undertaken in the past (Shakkai, 1992; The Woman of Wyrrd, 1990; etc.), Andrews's newest journey is ironically physical, even clinical, seeming to contradict her own thesis that a spiritual awakening compensates for the physical losses occasioned by menopause. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"An inspiring and compelling work. (Photographs—not seen)"
A scandal broke out a few years ago when American University president Berendzen was caught making sexually oriented phone calls to strangers. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Love may be a many-splendored thing, but Baldwin's palette is too bland to capture its essence. (Drawings and photographs- -not seen)"
Sketchy vignettes of 38 relationships, some romantic and enduring and some not, the subtitle notwithstanding. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"While never encumbering his text with ponderous arguments about constitutionality or educational theory, Bates strikes with range and depth at the heart of these issues, crucial for educators and all concerned Americans."
A balanced, well-documented account of a battle recently fought by a handful of Tennessee fundamentalist parents against high-school textbooks. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A powerful emetic, worth a swallow."
Eight exhortatory essays (some of which appeared previously in the Atlantic Monthly, The Progressive, and elsewhere) by the Kentuckian fiction writer (Fidelity, 1992, etc.) and moral critic (What are People For?, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Of some interest to urban historians, but slow-going for general readers. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
As crammed with facts and figures as a rush-hour express is with passengers, this history of the New York subway system stalls time and again. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A fine complement to David Rieff's The Exile (p. 773). (Illustrations)"
A perceptive appreciation of Miami and what makes it tick, from a pair of sociologists who understand that anecdotal evidence can be as illuminating as statistical abstracts. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Engaging, down-to-earth advisories from a master of the game."
Winning, if demanding, prescriptions for success from one of the NBA's best coaches. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >