Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 626)

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Credibly optimistic scenarios on what it will take for the US and wider world to realize the promise of bright tomorrows that lie within their reach."
An exuberantly upbeat and beguilingly plausible guide to the brave new world that sociologist Zey believes could eventuate from what he views as a macroindustrial era, i.e., one in which planet earth's inhabitants have the means and opportunity to gain full control over forces that previously have buffeted them. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"There's enough forceful material here to make this a standard- bearer in what may soon become a major ethical debate."
Look an orangutan straight in the eye and what do you see? Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 6, 1993

"Richard was found guilty and is serving life behind bars—but the evidence in the case, confounding and contradictory, is hardly clarified by Gray's often melodramatic treatment. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
The fatal poisoning in 1991 of Dallas socialite Nancy Lyon has all the ingredients for a solid true-crimer: big money; a philandering husband; incest; ambiguous evidence; courtroom drama. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 6, 1993

"Some amusing anecdotes and much generous praise for her colleagues—but unfocused and meandering. (Includes a succinct, inspirational foreword by Hillary Rodham Clinton) (Thirty-two pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
A personal but choppy overview of Boxer's 1992 fight for the US Senate—and of the races of other women who preceded or joined her there. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 6, 1993

"Though couched in well-mannered, even cautious, prose, Murphy's linkages offer a provocative new interpretation of the black American religious experience—one that's likely to inspire Afrocentrics even as it wrinkles the collars of conservative clerics and theologians."
Murphy's Santer°a (1988) was a dramatic firsthand, if scholarly, account of that African-Cuban religion. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Not a major contribution to the debate, then, but a fine introduction, ultimately original and engagingly written throughout."
Pornography, contends anthropologist Arcand (UniversitÇ Laval, QuÇbec), marks a choice in favor of a minimalist, uncommitted life purged as far as possible of appetites: the survivalist lifestyle of the anteater rather than that of the fast-living, pleasure-seeking jaguar. Read full book review >
MOTHER TONGUE by Joel Davis
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"A first-rate overview of language from A to Z, and then some."
Comprehensive report by veteran science writer Davis (Mapping the Code, 1990, etc.) on the glories and mysteries of language. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"A feisty travelogue informed by admiration for diverse countries and cultures past—but marred by poorly chosen language and a gallery of shallow and vulgar characters."
Miss Manners rewrites a gay Baedeker in a sometimes amusing, sometimes offensive, mix of dress tips and travelogue. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"One wonders what Sir Thomas More would say on the matter. (Thirteen illustrations)"
A report on—and critique of—life in American utopian communities of the 1800's. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Although stronger in explaining how we got into the current mess than what's to be done about it, Masons's slant on history— the human-animal orbit—is clever and subversive."
Throw a brick, suggests attorney Mason (coauthor, Animal Factories, 1980), and chances are good that you'll hit a ``dominionist''—someone convinced of the natural superiority of human beings and of their right to exploit all other living things. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 30, 1993

"Elegant, well-researched Americana, highlighting both the sweet excitement of a golden age and the bitter racism that helped it thrive. (Illustrations—not seen)"
Another sparkling urban cultural history from Nasaw (History/The College of Staten Island; Children of the City, 1985, etc.), chronicling the great entertainment arenas—movie palaces, amusement parks, World Fairs, ballparks, etc.—of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which, he says, helped to heat and stir the American melting pot. Read full book review >
WAY OUT WEST by Jane Stern
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 30, 1993

"All in all, then, a lopsided, outdated guide, best suited for those who still think that Custer died with his boots on. (Photographs—200 b&w and 300 color)"
And somewhere out in left field, too: The Sterns' new addition to their popular volumes of Americana (The Encyclopedia of Bad Taste, Sixties People, Elvis World, etc.) tackles ``the West of the imagination''—the West mythologized by dime novels, TV, and films; populated by singing cowboys who kiss their horses, Indians who raise their right hands and say ``How,'' and pesky ``critters'' like rattlesnakes and scorpions; and redolent with the scent of hot chili and chicken-fried steak. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >