Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 626)

THE SECRET LIFE OF THE SEINE by Mort Rosenblum
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1994

"Alternating romantic and acerbic tones inspire admiration, if not always envy, for a historically revered culture."
A lively insider's look at life on the Seine from seasoned Associated Press correspondent Rosenblum (Who Stole the News?, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1994

"A provocative, wide-ranging survey of the current state of the interface between the longings of youth and the wild potentials of computer technology."
Rushkoff, a New York-based journalist, goes west to Berkeley for a look inside Cyberia—the emerging countercultural terrain of computer hackers, ``smart'' drugs, house music, and a range of alternate ``cyberpunk'' lifestyles and anarchic philosophies. Read full book review >

THE COURAGE TO RAISE GOOD MEN by Olga Silverstein
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1994

"Literate, perceptive, and provocative—sure to heat up the fires of the gender debate."
What do men want? Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1994

"Stone's evenhanded, serious treatment of this material keeps it from being unbearable or cheaply sensational. (8 pages b&w photos—not seen)"
The painful story of a Wichita, Kansas, woman who learns through psychotherapy that the homicidal maniac stalking her resides in her subconscious self, a product of repressed, long- buried memories of sexual child abuse. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1994

"Though rarefied, some worthy ideas. (Illustrations)"
A black British sociologist weighs in with some jargon-heavy but stimulating essays on black identity at home and away. ``Contemporary British racism deals in cultural difference rather than crude biological hierarchy,'' observes Gilroy (The Black Atlantic). Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1994

"Lamentably, Flake's discursive prose and scattershot approach to reporting facts and events paints a somewhat bland, albeit accurate, portrait of a city well-known for its spicy cuisine."
An informative if somewhat longwinded paean to the dying traditions that fuel the annual Carnival, as well as a portrait of changing times in the Crescent City. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1994

"Detailed, generous analyses of complex artists, buttressed by lucid cultural speculation."
In the shadow of ``ethnic cleansing'' and rigid nationalism, a noted academic literary critic examines exemplary creations of the ``plural self'' and urges an extension of the private ironies of ``postmodern subjectivity'' into the public sphere. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1994

"A passionate and profoundly life-affirming collection. (Serial rights to Ladies Home Journal, Glamour, Utne Reader, etc.)"
Pearlman, editor of Listen to Their Voices (1993) and A Voice of One's Own (not reviewed), has a talent for rustling up the most interesting guests for her literary salons. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 31, 1994

"Rewarding for its glimpses into the real lives and thoughts of black adolescents in the city, otherwise diffuse and unconvincing."
This compilation of observations, journal entries, and conversations sets out to prove that New York's City's housing projects do not deserve their reputation as ``drug-infested war zones.'' Sociologists Williams (New School; Crack House, 1992, etc.) and Kornblum (CUNY; co-author, Growing Up Poor, 1985) set up the Harlem Writer's Crew, recruiting young people who lived in low- income housing projects in Harlem—the ``'jects''—to keep journals. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 30, 1994

Through her experiences as both reporter and victim of the vicious Colombian drug cartels, Duz†n reveals the symbiotic yet deadly relationship between the drug bosses and her country's political and economic history. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 28, 1994

"Unfortunately, Erikson, who often testifies in litigation cases involving trauma, leaves the reader frustrated and ultimately dissatisfied by his failure to bring up to date his report and conclusions on the communities examined."
Erikson (Sociology/Yale) expands his earlier examination of communities under stress (Everything in Its Path, 1977) in an attempt to define a new kind of trauma that those victimized by man-made disasters now face. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 19, 1994

"Neither sappy nor self-indulgent, and as compelling as Tracy Kidder's House: a beautifully written memoir sure to win Gaines a new following. (First printing of 25,000)"
A world-weary, middle-aged novelist (Dangler, 1980, etc.) and sportswriter retreats to the wilds of Nova Scotia to build a house and rebuild his family. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >