Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 626)

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"But her emphasis on journalism, especially women journalists as agents for change, however single- and perhaps simple-minded, is at least tangible and certainly thought- provoking."
To her exploration of violence and sexuality in masculine sports, Nelson (Are We Winning Yet?, 1991) brings formidable journalistic skills, a sharp anecdotal style, and incisive logic. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"General readers will certainly be challenged, but this is not a law book for lawyers only."
Rigorous study of the constitutional right to choose reproductive technology, by law professor/legal bioethicist Robertson (Univ. of Texas, Austin). Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"Though Walzer could show himself more aware of some issues, especially gender and race, this is a well-argued, if not always energetic, set of carefully wrought ideas on the state of public moral debate."
Walzer (The Company of Critics, 1988, etc.) thoughtfully answers objections to his many influential volumes of social criticism. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"As fundamentalism grows in the Middle East and more women return to the veil, the repressive lifestyle Mernissi depicts may not be just a sad relic of the past but an ominous sign of the future."
Prominent Middle Eastern scholar Mernissi's (Beyond the Veil, not reviewed) childhood memoir should be titled ``The Making of a Muslim Feminist.'' Readers expecting a narrative about a sultan's harem where voluptuous Venuses loll in silk-draped palaces will be disappointed; Mernissi's subject is the domestic harem of her extended family. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1994

This synthesis of history and biography offers a cautionary corrective to less than candid Black Panther accounts like Elaine Brown's A Taste of Power and David Hilliard's This Side of Glory. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"All in all, a thoughtful, patiently assembled book that probes carefully and with moral toughness into precisely those painful truths."
As in God's Dust (1989), Buruma takes a psychological and cultural voyage into nationalism, guilt, and self-delusion — in this case, of two of WW II's defeated Axis powers. Read full book review >
THE THINGS THAT MATTER MOST by Cal Thomas
NON-FICTION
Released: May 31, 1994

"The text includes an awesomely self-congratulatory foreword from Rush Limbaugh. (First printing of 150,000; Conservative Book Club selection; $150,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Short, acerbic takes on contemporary mores from a widely syndicated newspaper columnist who views the state of the union with considerable alarm. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 24, 1994

A book by a white scholar claiming special insight into ``black realities'' promises to be either brave or presumptuous. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 23, 1994

"A stimulating personal reflection on the complexities of communication between people, in whatever language or culture."
Perceptive anecdotes from Austria, India, and Mexico, from heroin-addict treatment centers, scuba dives, and linguistics conferences pepper this primer on the intricacies of cross-cultural discourse and ordinary conversation. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 22, 1994

"Despite its structural and stylistic flaws, this book provides a pleasant rustic excursion, complete with recipes to tease your taste buds."
Some city folk find that country life is not without its share of troubles, just as Murphey's account—though infused with considerable charm—also has some problems. Read full book review >
COLORED PEOPLE by Henry Louis Gates
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 18, 1994

"Gates left West Virginia for Yale and a meteoric career; the worlds he has seen since should someday make a terrific sequel."
One of the country's top black scholars offers a tender memoir of his youth in a West Virginia paper mill town in the 1950s and '60s. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 1994

"Yet, despite past victories, he is only too aware of the continuing, desperate plight of the African-American underclass."
Greenberg (Race Relations in American History, not reviewed), former head of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, recounts the revolutionary and riveting saga of the fight for civil rights in the 1950s and '60s. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >