Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 626)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"An unsparing, honest, and courageous family document. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Psychotherapist Ione's emotional family history focuses on the legacy of three generations of her African-American foremothers, exploring the roots of her own upbringing in a fragmented nuclear family. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"A perceptive, unapologetic self-portrait by an unrepentantly self-involved man."
The founder of Grand Street offers an erudite and prickly memoir about friendships with intellectuals and socialites, dozens of love affairs, and his struggles to emerge from the shadow of his powerful father. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

A heartfelt and worthy study by labor-attorney Geoghegan of what it means to be on the side of organized labor at a time when labor is written off as an ancient relic. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"A fascinating and provocative case study—though, unfortunately, the Hamburgers, with their narrow thesis, miss Sarah Austin's genuine social, political, and psychological significance. (Four-page b&w photo insert—not seen.)"
From scraps of letters rescued from a Polish library, Lotte (a free-lance writer) and Joseph (Political Science/Yale) Hamburger reconstruct a torrid unconsummated epistolary affair (1832-34) between Sarah Austin, wife of a brilliant but sickly English legal theorist, and Byronic German Prince Puckler Muskau, whose book describing his fortune-hunting trip to England Sarah had translated, falling in love with him in the process. Read full book review >
WAITING FOR THE WEEKEND by Witold Rybczynski
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

A kind of observing philosopher of the domestic, Rybczynski (an architect by profession: The Most Beautiful House in the World, 1989, etc.) here takes a look at time, work, leisure, and recreation—and at that entirely man-made phenomenon, the weekend. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 29, 1991

"Friends, family, and associates are vividly evoked, as are the difficult times Bell lived through, but it is she herself, modest and self-deprecating, who is the real heroine of this poignant story of great loss and some gain."
A wise and affecting memoir, remarkable for its honesty and lack of self-pity, of a life lived in interesting times by Czech- born feminist historian Bell. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 25, 1991

"Be that as it may, Sakaiya's musings are too mystical and mystifying to provide a decent return on any time invested trying to make sense of them."
Millennial murk that, under the title Chika Kakumei, was a 1985 best-seller in Japan. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 19, 1991

"In spite of its flaws, a generally restrained, well-written account of where the abortion debate stands now, with intimations of what may lie ahead."
Here, Whitney (Uncommon Lives: Gay Men and Straight Women, 1990) surveys the complex intermingling of law, science, and faith in the debate over abortion. Read full book review >
SLEEPING WITH THE DEVIL by Suzanne Finstad
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 16, 1991

"A complicated yarn, full of seeming inconsistencies, and told with a fervent thoroughness that, rather than adding depth, destroys both tension and narrative flow. (Sixteen pages of photographs—some seen.)"
As in Ulterior Motives (1987), Finstad focuses here on money, megalomania, and mayhem, Texas-style. Read full book review >
PORTRAITS OF FRANCE by Robert Daley
HISTORY
Released: July 14, 1991

"An engaging story of a man's love affair with a country, and a congenial portrait of one writer's life."
Personal reminiscences of an aspiring American writer's life in France, mixed in with a vigorous dose of French history, by the author of A Faint Cold Fear, Year of the Dragon, etc.—a treat for Francophiles and Daley fans alike. Read full book review >
THE PRIVATE WAR OF MRS. PACKARD by Barbara Sapinsley
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: July 1, 1991

"An eye-opener. (Photographs—not seen.)"
All the makings of a TV docudrama in an unlikely source: the story of feisty Elizabeth Packard, little-known 19th-century advocate of the rights of mental patients, by journalist (Newsweek, The New York Times, etc.) and TV-writer Sapinsley. Read full book review >
MALCOLM by Bruce Perry
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1991

"A complex portrait that successfully illuminates the inner conflicts that drove Malcolm X to greatness and destruction."
Perry (ed., The Last Speeches of Malcolm X—not reviewed) uses hundreds of interviews, government records, and Malcolm X's own speeches and letters to present a lively, critical biography of the black nationalist hero. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >