Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 626)

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"Funiciello's firsthand knowledge of poverty in America and her common-sense suggestions for dealing with it should open many minds."
A welfare-mother-turned-activist's cri de coeur for ending poverty in America—by changing our attitudes toward the poor and dismantling the welfare system. Read full book review >
PAUL ROBESON JR. SPEAKS TO AMERICA by Paul Robeson
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"Though the prose veers toward scholarly denseness, these essays cover vital ground in the debate over the future of America's cultural soul. (First printing of 10,000)"
Feisty and persuasive essays championing the principle of multiculturalism. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"The West needs a new image, and she's given us many to choose from."
Take the cowboy, please, and send him packing, along with all his mythological baggage—or so argues Russell (Writing/Western New Mexico University) in this provocative and iconoclastic study. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"Still, a somewhat useful introduction to men's issues for those who prefer sloganeering psychologisms to the literary allusions of Bly."
Allen (director of the Texas Men's Institute) and Robinson (a freelance writer) show how the stereotypes men are raised with, as well as the allegedly dysfunctional parents who raise them, produce emotional cripples—and how talk-therapy fails them while the new rituals associated with Robert Bly will free them. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"A collection that raises questions not so much about pairing or even creativity, but rather about how people living such chaotic lives function at all—and about why those who enjoy their art should care about their sexual logistics."
Essentially gossip—in spite of the trendy title—in these 13 essays by various authors on the influence that sexually paired writers or artists have on each other. Read full book review >

LOVE MATCH by Sandra Faulkner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1993

"Numerous questions go begging in the emotion-laden, self- serving text—making this hardly the work by which to judge Navratilova, the pair's relationship, or, for that matter, Nelson herself. (Illustrations)"
Former Texas beauty-queen Nelson tells—as written by sociologist Faulkner—of her eight-year affair with tennis great Martina Navratilova, as well as of the pair's litigious breakup and eventual out-of-court settlement. Read full book review >
THE FIFTIES by David Halberstam
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"Compulsively readable, with familiar events and people grown fresh in the telling."
In The Best and the Brightest, The Powers That Be, and The Reckoning, Halberstam proved that he can master intimidating subjects with aplomb—and in this massive tome on a convulsive decade in American life, he meets with equal success. Read full book review >
THE WISH FOR KINGS by Lewis H. Lapham
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"Eloquent, piercingly intelligent essays crying out against America's Orwellian future."
The editor of Harper's and author of Imperial Masquerade (1990), etc., reaches the top of his form in five distinguished essays arguing that too few Americans any longer care or know enough to protect and nurture democratic institutions. ``[The] habits of liberty have fallen into disuse,'' writes Lapham, ``and the promise of democracy no longer inspires or exalts a majority of the people lucky enough to have been born under its star.'' America has devolved into an oligarchy, the argument begins—an argument buttressed with facts, figures, and observations—and the nation's collective frame of mind has changed as well over the past 30 years from that of ``democrat'' to that of ``courtier'': from a citizenry that understands government to be what the governed make of it to a citizenry that passively and obsequiously seeks favors and dispensations from the high and unresponsive powers that be. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"An important, well-documented study that deserves attention."
A forceful analysis of attempts to deny the Nazi Holocaust. Read full book review >
THE PEOPLE IN THE PLAYGROUND by Iona Opie
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"Unlike the 1992 reissue of Opie's I Saw Esau, written with her late husband, Peter, this has no colorful Maurice Sendak illustrations interpreting the scene—but the text is nonetheless appealing for its heartening picture of children at play. (Two b&w plates)"
Down in the schoolyard, as Opie (The Classic Fairy Tales, 1974, etc.) presents her impressions of exuberant playground life during the English equivalent of recess. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

Best known as the ``pioneer of outing'' (identifying homosexuals in public life), gay activist-journalist Signorile (a columnist for The Advocate) offers no revelations in this angry memoir. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"Seymour has captured that life splendidly. (Photographs)"
Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938), benefactor to and social catalyst of the Bloomsbury Group, has found in Seymour (Ring of Conspirators, 1989, etc.) a sharp eye and fine sense of irony to tell, for the first time, her side of the story (her memoirs, which appeared shortly after her death, were edited by her husband)—and it's an amazing one, including nearly every artist and writer in early 20th-century England. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >