Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 628)

DAKOTA by Kathleen Norris
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Quiet and clearheaded, with typical first-book flaws."
A meditative mÇlange of observations on Midwest land and spirit. Read full book review >
THE CITY IN SLANG by Irving Lewis Allen
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A good read that puts on airs: Allen should have dropped the philology and stuck to his chronicle of the urban scene. (Six halftones, 12 line drawings.)"
A professor goes slumming through the dives and byways of Gotham, Ö la Henry Higgins, to hear what people have to say and to tell us what it means. Read full book review >

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Carcaterra has a strong story to tell, but he's told it best before."
Encouraged by the enthusiastic response to his article in Life magazine (May 1991) on growing up with a murderously violent father, Carcaterra, a former New York Daily News reporter, has now expanded the piece to book-length—and, alas, transformed what was a powerful and moving examination of the psychological and physical costs of family abuse into a diffuse and frequently confusing account. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Jessica Hagedorn, Fay Weldon, Jane Smiley, Jayne Anne Phillips, Terry Tempest Williams, and Shirley Abbott are among the others whom Pearlman speaks to in this engaging, informative collection."
Though described as ``twenty interviews,'' what Pearlman (ed., American Women Writing Fiction, 1989, etc.) really gives us here is not Q&A talks but something more: brief and telling profiles of 20 women writers, with extensive conversational quotes from the authors. Read full book review >
HIDDEN VICTIMS by Violet M. Franck
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Earnest—but poorly written and tough to digest."
Several years ago, first-time author Franck's brother was convicted of murder. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A lost reputation rises from the dead and adds a fearless new voice to the black Renaissance. (Fourteen halftones—not seen.)"
Richly voiced African-American memoir by Davis (1905-87), a journalist-poet who disappeared in 1948 and became known as the ``mystery poet.'' This memoir has been lovingly edited by John Edgar Tidwell (English/Miami University of Ohio) from a variety of manuscripts put together after Davis's death, and it may be expanded if more of his second volume, That Incredible Waikiki Jungle, is ever found. Read full book review >
A TASTE OF POWER by Elaine Brown
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Timely, front-row view of a turbulent era. Put it on the shelf beside The Autobiography of Malcolm X."
Engrossing, jolting, behind-the-scenes memoir by the woman who led the Black Panther Party to mainstream power-brokering without giving up the guns, and who ended up fleeing its violence: a stunning picture of a black woman's coming of age in America. Read full book review >
MALCOLM X by Michael Friedly
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 29, 1992

"1290; Benjamin Karim's Remembering Malcolm, reviewed below), the most revealing about the killing. (Eight-page photo insert.)"
One of three Malcolm X books (so far) set to appear along with Spike Lee's epic film. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Dec. 28, 1992

"An informative and useful contribution to mutual understanding—but marred by less than scintillating prose."
A somewhat dry yet comprehensive report on Japanese women— from a professor of psychology (at Tokyo's Keio Univ.) and adviser on women's issues. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 15, 1992

"A most rewarding remembrance. (Illustrations.)"
Admirably modest, intimate, and compelling dual bio/memoir of Malcolm X and his assistant minister Benjamin Goodman, now Benjamin Karim. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Dec. 15, 1992

"AIDS''—but, overall, this vital and original study goes a long way toward restoring the dignity of a much-maligned group of outcasts. (Photographs.)"
`` 'Tis Pity She's a Whore,'' wrote playwright John Ford in 1633, summing up society's general attitude toward prostitutes. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Dec. 14, 1992

"Coinciding with an election year that's focused on these myths, Mount's argument acquires a particularly ironic twist- -for one way demagogues control the family, he shows, is to claim they are in favor of it."
From TLS editor Mount (The Selkirk Strip, 1988, etc.): a controversial history of love and marriage in Europe that reveals how threatening private relationships have been to both church and state—and how those institutions have unsuccessfully attempted to suppress private relationships by perpetuating myths about how modern or unstable or unnatural such relationships are. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Andrea Beaty
August 30, 2016

In Andrea Beaty and David Roberts’ new picture book Ada Twist, Scientist is like her classmates, builder Iggy and inventor Rosie: scientist Ada, a character of color, has a boundless imagination and has always been hopelessly curious. Why are there pointy things stuck to a rose? Why are there hairs growing inside your nose? When her house fills with a horrific, toe-curling smell, Ada knows it’s up to her to find the source. Not afraid of failure, she embarks on a fact-finding mission and conducts scientific experiments, all in the name of discovery. But this time, her experiments lead to even more stink and get her into trouble! Inspired by real-life makers such as Ada Lovelace and Marie Curie, Ada Twist, Scientist champions girl power and women scientists, and brings welcome diversity to picture books about girls in science. “Cool and stylish,” our reviewer writes. View video >