Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 628)

MY MOTHER WORKED AND I TURNED OUT OKAY by Katherine Goldman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1993

"Celebrating the resilience of children and their parents: a cheerful antidote to those who rail against working mothers."
A lighthearted but not empty-headed look at adult children of working mothers. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1993

"A sobering and much needed call to action."
A compassionate, thoughtful analysis of an alarming and increasingly frequent phenomenon in our rapidly diversifying society. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1993

"A powerful salvo in the war over political correctness—and a ringing reaffirmation of the principles of free thought as conceived by Locke, John Stuart Mill, and others."
A compelling defense of free speech against its new enemies, who range from the mosques of Iran to the groves of American academe. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 1, 1993

"As in a good novel, these real-life characters elicit cheers and boos, sympathy and disdain—and greater understanding of the emotional minefield walked by new parents."
A remarkably absorbing series of stories about real couples dealing with pregnancy and baby's first year. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1993

"A positive—if too gimmicky—spin for those who think of themselves as victims. (Diagrams—not seen)"
A self-help volume for adult children of dysfunctional families that puts the emphasis on rising above adversity rather than on reliving the pain of abusive relationships. Read full book review >

DAILY FARE by Kathleen Aguero
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1993

Seventeen autobiographical essays of varying quality that address the authors' experiences ``outside''—as editor Aguero (Humanities/Pine Manor College) puts it—the ``dominant tradition'' of ``white, male, heterosexual, upper-class, Eurocentric'' culture. Read full book review >
THE UNMASKING by Kevin Flynn
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 29, 1993

"Overall, then, a torpid chronicle."
Sluggish, standard-model true-crime account of a multiple rapist who concealed his crimes for seven years while married and involved in a fundamentalist church. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 29, 1993

"A thoughtful, well-documented addition to the often high- pitched debates on this emotional subject."
A persuasive argument for giving the severely ill, and those facing a lingering death, options about levels of care, as well as the right to a dignified death. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 29, 1993

"Wonderfully authentic: an admirably lighthearted supplement to W.J. Cash's classic The Mind of the South. (Maps.)"
Where exactly is the South? Read full book review >
THE FATHER-DAUGHTER DANCE by Barbara Goulter
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 24, 1993

"The authors push all the right buttons, but the concepts aren't really new nor the insights very fresh."
Coming to terms with dysfunctional father-daughter relationships. Read full book review >
ONE BOY AT WAR by Paul A. Sergios
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 24, 1993

"Impressive and meticulously documented: an essential chronicle for all who would understand the bitter reality of AIDS in America today."
An insider's detailed view of the desperate measures taken by those suffering from AIDS to find an effective treatment; by ex- Hollywood whiz-kid Sergios, who became a driving force in the AIDS underground after testing HIV-positive. Read full book review >
THE VILLAGE by Alice Taylor
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 24, 1993

"Sentimental but entertainingly so: the story of a village well kept and a life well lived."
Taylor's third volume of Irish reminiscences (Quench the Lamp, 1991; To School Through the Fields, 1990) continues in a sunny vein as it evokes the history, landscape, and sometimes dotty citizenry of tiny 1960's Innishannon, where the author raised five kids, opened a guest house, and manned the local post office and grocery store. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >