Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 628)

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Though Sidel does step beyond sound-bite reporting, fewer—and more thorough—case studies would have better explored the ironies and subtleties of this topic."
A sometimes illuminating survey of campus conflicts over bias and identity, based on interviews with 100 students, faculty, and administrators on 17 campuses. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"This testament to how deeply jobs shape workers' lives is as invaluable a cultural document as Susan Orleans's Saturday Night. (Photos, not seen) (First serial to Esquire)"
This chronicle of freelance journalist Snowden's year in the trenches of America's work force could well serve as a textbook for Modern American Culture 101. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Yet the reader will be constantly and wincingly aware that the authors are perfectly earnest."
A flaky journey into the heart of dimness that is the Men's Movement. Read full book review >
KREMLIN WIVES by Larissa Vasilieva
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Some stunning stuff, but one often feels that one is dealing with the ghost of Elvis."
If this book proves anything, it is that the Russians have as much to learn about investigative journalism as they have about running an economy. Read full book review >
THE WIESENTHAL FILE by Alan Levy
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Finally, he offers a guarded evaluation of Wiesenthal's role in the controversy surrounding Kurt Waldheim, suggesting that a much earlier rift between Wiesenthal and the World Jewish Congress sparked much of the name-calling directed at the veteran Nazi-hunter in recent discussions of that case."
This biography of famed Nazi-hunter Simon Wiesenthal is so well written that it often seems like a thriller rather than a serious examination of the aftermath of the Holocaust filtered through one survivor's experience. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"A lovingly wrought—but overly lengthy—bit of arcane religious history. (b&w illustrations)"
A scrupulous dissection of the daily lives of a group of cloistered 17th-century Franciscan nuns as seen through the eyes of one blighted sister in their midst. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 29, 1994

"Compelling and well presented, this volume deserves to be read by anyone concerned with Christian or political extremism in America."
A fascinating and terrifying account that is at once a work of academic scholarship and a startling exposÇ of a particularly virulent form of religious extremism. Read full book review >
JACQUELINE KENNEDY ONASSIS by Lester David
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 28, 1994

"To be read under the hair dryer, but not really thrilling enough to take home. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) (First printing of 50,000; first serial to New Woman)"
A rehash of the life of Jackie as she turns 65: a collection of old news, non-news, and tabloid analysis. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 18, 1994

"Purple prose, flowery extended metaphors, and an obvious nostalgic longing for the 1960s mar what aspires to be an important study."
An alternately serious and silly look at the 60s as an era of spiritual change in the United States. Read full book review >
BETWEEN THE WARS by Aldous Huxley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 15, 1994

"This idiosyncratic pendant to his major works reveals Huxley in a phase state between his more familiar roles."
In time for the centennial of Huxley's birth, a journalistic miscellany—of pieces delivered over the radio, at the podium, and in magazines and newspapers—from the same period as Brave New World (1932). Read full book review >
PRISONER OF WOODSTOCK by Dallas Taylor
NON-FICTION
Released: July 15, 1994

"A worthy cautionary tale, however, doesn't necessarily make a good book. (16 pages of b&w photos, not seen)"
The unbilled drummer in the supergroup Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young tells an unsatisfying and not always credible story of drugs and sex (and a little rock 'n' roll). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 11, 1994

"Worthwhile if only for Phebe Davis's pungent observations, but also for framing historic patterns of abuse of the mentally ill."
A hundred years of first-person reports from women committed to mental institutions that seem no less distressing in the 20th century than in the 19th. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >