Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 630)

FAMILYHOOD by Lee Salk
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"A compassionate and caring, albeit sometimes simplistic, call for adults and children to take the time to talk—and to listen—to one another."
A tribute to family values—respect, responsibility, and emotional support—from the well-known child psychologist who died this May. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"All the royalties go to the charity Oxfam America."
A who's who of the New Age movement, and guests, prescribes a what's what for global change—and despite the brevity of these short essays by 52 celebrities with a conscience, there's much to chew on. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: July 17, 1992

"The Colfaxes have quite a story to tell and do it justice in the telling. (Eight-page photo insert—not seen.)"
When, in 1973, the Colfaxes bought 47 isolated acres in California's Redwood Mountains, they had no inkling of the challenges their rough homestead would pose. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 15, 1999

"Don't put the elderly on social ice floes is the plea here, accompanied by compassionate, if not always solidly grounded, insights into growing old that will benefit the elderly and their children alike. (First Serial to Time; Book-of-the-Month Club featured alternate; author tour)"
Blazing a trail into the emotional life of people who are growing old, the author hacks away at much of the debris'stereotypes, indifference, and fear—that separates younger generations from their elders, but doesn't always escape the grip of sentimentality. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 10, 1999

"There is too little literature about these desperate pre-State years, so Heller's impassioned and opinionated memoir offers a rarely heard voice in the (still ongoing) argument among Jewish factions in Israel. (8 pages photos, not seen)"
A tense, confrontational, yet moving memoir of Jewish women underground fighters and political prisoners in Mandate Palestine. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 19, 1997

"Bravin's research on the crucial years is admirable, but his final product is incomplete and only intermittently interesting. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) (First serial to Buzz magazine; author tour)"
This biography of Lynette ``Squeaky'' Fromme—would-be assassin of President Ford—leaves large portions of her life unexplored, focusing in full only on her years in the Manson Family and her attempt to shoot the president. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 12, 1997

"Coles would do better to stick to Living Single and leave the role of Miss Lonelyhearts to others."
The sexy sistah from the TV show Living Single offers nothing new in this not-ready-for-prime-time guide for the single woman. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 6, 1997

"Garfield is best when writing about himself, and the book is partly redeemed by the section on his own pursuits, which contains essays on tourism, house and car shopping, and hunting, all in a Dave Barryish vein."
According to NPR commentator Garfield, the American Dream is less about white picket fences and two cars in the garage and far more about ``the pursuit of happiness.'' As the humorist proves, the pursuit, while often noble, is just as often fruitless. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 4, 1997

"Although the research and observations validate and celebrate female styles of leadership that flourish around kitchen tables and in church basements, the accounts of success stories are often muddled and repetitious, with far too much attention paid to how research projects were designed."
An academic report, including research projects that uphold ``women's ways of knowing'' and programs that allow women to grow by ``gaining a voice,'' that is both uplifting and redundant. Read full book review >
THE SEEING GLASS by Jacquelin Gorman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 1997

"Two memorable stories in one. (First serial to Good Housekeeping and Reader's Digest; Book-of-the-Month Club selection)"
A terrifying bout of blindness stirs up recollections of a dark family story in this moving memoir. Read full book review >
MY LIFE AS A BOY by Kim Chernin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 23, 1997

"But Woolf informs readers about the mysteries of gender; Chernin manages little more than a change of costume. (First serial to Utne Reader)"
A book, slim as a 10-year-old's silhouette and foggy as an adolescent fantasy, about a retreat from femininity, an attempt by the author to transform herself into a boy. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 30, 1992

"At best, a sophisticated analysis of a very real crisis, and an earnest plea for America to face some home truths; at worst, an experience akin to suffering from the blur of a 350-page Op-Ed piece."
A heartfelt and perceptive analysis of what Guinness (Visiting Fellow/The Brookings Institute; The Gravedigger File, 1983, etc.- -not reviewed) sees as the cultural crisis facing America today. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >