Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 630)

DAPHNE DU MAURIER: HAUNTED HEIRESS by Nina Auerbach
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"A valiant but unconvincing effort to resuscitate du Maurier to literary respectability."
Last night I dreamed of . . . a Daphne du Maurier whose works were "startlingly brilliant," peopled with "most unsavory" men and "defective" women, and whose exegesis here is shrouded in literary fog. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Only for those who are already Bright fans. (Author tour)"
An unfocused, blistering rant about sexual issues near and dear to the author's heart. Read full book review >

MY LESBIAN HUSBAND by Barrie Jean Borich
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Much broader than a lesbian-interest title, this book will resonate with many readers, regardless of sexual orientation, bringing a nod of recognition to some, a twinge of longing to others."
A passionate, intricately composed memoir of the author's long-term love relationship, set against the backdrop of their Minneapolis neighborhood and complicated family ties. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1999

"Despite Mendelsohn's disturbingly excessive descriptions of his numerous one-night stands, his insights into the mechanisms of gay culture are interesting."
Mendelsohn's first book is a clever attempt to look at gay identity and family mythology through literary narratives of antiquity. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1999

"48 b&w illustrations, not seen)."
A breakthrough biography of Douglass's private life, highlighting the fruitful and romantic relationship between the abolitionist and former slave and his German translator and companion. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1999

"Hass graces Gaza with revolutionary fire, but ultimately, her book only proves that nothing positive is built on rage."
Remarkable but vehemently Marxist reportage from an Israeli journalist who adopts Gaza as her home. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 24, 1999

"8216;' This book will certainly help parents learn some new steps."
This guide to how children learn language highlights the "extraordinary in the ordinary" and applies the latest scientific research to understanding the art of speech. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 16, 1999

"While this is an absorbing and skillfully written personal account of one woman's life on the factory floor, it's doesn't provide much of a window into today's often-embattled workforce."
An interesting tale of personal fulfillment, as a sedentary journalist proves she can hack it on the factory floor of a General Motors plant, but one that provides disappointingly little insight into the larger issues confronting workers in today's global economy. Read full book review >
THE PRISONER'S WIFE by Asha Bandele
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 4, 1999

"Mesmerizing and disconcerting, offering insights into why caged birds sing."
A haunting, intensely emotional memoir of the middle-class author's relationship with a man jailed for murder. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1999

"A fine anthropological read and another spade of dirt tossed on the coffin of Eurocentrism."
An anthropologist's collection of essays formed at the tectonic plates of colliding cultures. Read full book review >
THE MALE BODY by Susan Bordo
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1999

"Bordo may get personal but is never too serious, and her work underlines some surprising commonalities and differences between the sexes without a whiff of demagoguery."
A cheerful but probing look at the male form, seeking to prove that similar myths, fantasies, and pressures have been applied to men's and women's bodies, with some surprising parallel effects on the male and female mind. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1999

"Life, of course, is tangled—the lives of these women perhaps more than most—but Chang's eye for detail and willingness to probe can't overcome prose that reads like a final project for a writer's workshop."
First-time author Chang rather falteringly describes the flight of her mother and three friends from the Communist takeover of China to middle-class lives in the US. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >