Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 630)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 1992

An informed and evenhanded critique of the ``creeping professionalism'' that imperils American sport; by an activist observer with impeccable credentials. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1992

"A fine yarn for mariners, armchair or otherwise, and a cautionary tale for those who do business in great waters. (Illustrations—not seen.)"
A fascinatingly detailed account of how a handful of Japanese sailing enthusiasts overcame cultural tradition and public disinterest to make their country a credible contender for one of yachting's greatest prizes—the America's Cup. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1997

"A good deal of this stream has been exhaustively panned, but there are some nuggets here."
If one has any doubt about the vacuousness of most diplomatic summits, this book by Gorbachev's interpreter at the 1987 summit with Ronald Reagan in Washington, D.C., should remove it. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"An effective, affecting portrait of a resilient, dispossessed people who continue to believe that they shall overcome some day."
A veteran journalist's engrossing take on the Kurds, a people who pose a constant difficulty for governments throughout the Middle East and the largest ethnic group in the world (25 million) without its own country. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

Bancroft Prizewinning historian Ryan finds the roots of American democracy at its best in the public passions of New York City, New Orleans, and San Francisco, circa 182580. Read full book review >

RACE, CRIME, AND THE LAW by Randall Kennedy
NON-FICTION
Released: May 15, 1997

"Whether his specific analyses are right or wrong, Kennedy's insistence on substituting thought for sloganeering is a refreshing anomaly in the bitter debate over the legal system's treatment of minorities. (Author tour)"
``The most salient feature of race relations in America at the end of the twentieth century is its complexity,'' writes Kennedy. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 15, 1997

"Nonetheless, she does children and harried parents a service by assembling in one volume vivid accounts of the varied political and social forces that are damaging families today."
Return parenting to parents. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Gratifying reading for women of all ages—and would that men would read it as well. (Twelve pages of photographs—not seen.)"
Add to the genre of books on the sociology of women in science this first-rate compendium of bios of women who got the Big One— and a few who came close. Read full book review >
AMONG THE THUGS by Bill Buford
NON-FICTION
Released: June 8, 1992

"An extraordinary and powerful cautionary cry."
A horrific and almost unbearably up-close look at British football (soccer) fan violence; by the editor of Granta. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 25, 1992

"Effective social history, then, as told by the participants. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Very much in the populist spirit and style of Studs Terkel, the creator of the Foxfire series here documents the experiences of 20th-century civil-rights activists who had a strong connection with the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 22, 1992

"And perhaps one of those will do a more successful job of picking up the threads and weaving a tapestry than she has done. (Illustrations—24—not seen.)"
A somewhat unfocused but heavily researched volume on the images and roles of aging women from Neanderthal times to the present. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 18, 1992

In this unflinching account of betrayed ideals, Wettlin, an American who went to Russia in 1932 for one year but fell in love and stayed another 50, gives a stunning and moving portrait of a long-suffering people ``essentially unpragmatic, uncompetitive, and acutely sensitive to the mystery of life.'' A native of Philadelphia, Wettlin went to the Soviet Union eager to contribute her skills as a high-school teacher to this nation that promised so much. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >