Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 630)

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 14, 1991

"A flawed but worthwhile addition, then, to current Middle East reportage."
From Winternitz (East Along the Equator, 1987)—an absorbing, often moving, eyewitness account of a West Bank village's growing involvement with the Intifada. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"A first-rate study that reaches far beyond its ostensible subject to give a textured, gritty profile of New York past and present."
A New York Newsday columnist with a novelist's eye and fine sense of pacing explores the world of the N.Y.C. subway—in a timely account that is not only about the city's transit system but also about its people and its soul. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 23, 1991

A scholarly yet charming compilation of distinctly feminine Native American legends—a continuation of the explorations that Allen (English/UCLA) began in The Sacred Hoop (1986) and Spider Woman's Granddaughters (a 1990 American Book Award). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 17, 1991

"A revealing glimpse or 19th-century Bostonian society, written by an intelligent and perceptive woman who's not afraid to question either herself or her world."
The thoughtful diary of an upper-crust Bostonian woman, written between the years 1844 and 1904. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1999

"A turning point in Japanese history, illuminated through diligent research and piercing insight. (80 b&w photos)"
An NBCC award winner and expert in the modern history of Japan, Dower (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology; Japan in War and Peace, 1994; War Without Mercy, 1986) absorbingly explains how American forces imposed a revolution from above in six years of occupation that transformed imperial Japan into a democracy. Read full book review >

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Aug. 20, 1998

"Unheard voices crying for a hearing."
A startling series of testimonies about urban violence from New York City teens. Read full book review >
A CENTURY OF ARTS AND LETTERS by John Updike
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 7, 1998

"Nearly every entry re-explains who Johnson and Vanamee were or rehashes the early scandals."
A surprisingly dull collection of essays commemorating America's preeminent institution of arts and letters on its centennial. Read full book review >
THE DREAM ENDURES by Kevin Starr
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1997

"A penetrating addition to an altogether splendid series, which (thanks to the broad appeal of its subject matter and period) could prove a breakout book."
The fifth volume in Starr's grand and wide-ranging history of California (Endangered Dreams, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 31, 1997

A glimpse into the actual lives of two members of that unfortunate subset of society that Americans love to stereotype and despise: the welfare mother. Read full book review >
RAMBLIN' ROSE by Jonny Whiteside
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 14, 1997

"A solid biography, and a welcome addition to the history of modern American popular music. (50 illustrations, not seen)"
A future country music legend travels with her family from rural America to the ``promised land'' of California, only to find herself embroiled as she grows up in unexpected fame, domestic strife, and teenage pregnancy. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Still, Levenstein's examples and anecdotes of folly and worse, and his debunking of experts and authorities from Margaret Mead on, make lively reading. (Fifteen halftones.)"
Levenstein's Revolution at the Table (1988), which surveyed the changes in American food habits between 1880 and 1930, is widely deemed a major contribution to our culinary history. Read full book review >
CHICAGO DAYS/HOBOKEN NIGHTS by Daniel Pinkwater
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 21, 1991

"And Pinkwater fans can have the fun of recognizing germs of his fiction here and there."
Funnyman Pinkwater has written ``about 50'' children's books and illustrated most of them. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >