Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 630)

HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1999

"Learned literary tourism about literary tourism, in one of the best places on earth for it."
Sunny, island-hopping philhellenism as encountered in Henry Miller's The Colossus of Maroussi and Lawrence Durrell's Prospero's Cell and Reflections on a Marine Venus. Read full book review >
THE LIVING GODDESSES by Marija Gimbutas
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: April 1, 1999

"Full of intriguing possibilities, but Gimbutas's work is too wedded to theory and ideology, rather than to archaeological evidence, to be ultimately persuasive. (130 b&w illustrations, 1 map)"
Another contribution to the much-ballyhooed theory of matriarchal prehistory, by the late feminist pioneer Gimbutas (Archaeology/UCLA; Goddesses and Gods of Old Europe, not reviewed). Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1999

"Although Gordon works hard to detach Minny and Fenimore from James's shadow, she can't quite unravel his strategies to keep his private life private. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A sharply observed but ultimately frustrated view of the Master, as reflected through the lives of one woman who inspired his art and another who shared in his dedication to fiction. Read full book review >
BETTY FRIEDAN by Judith Hennessee
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1999

67943203.599 Hennessee, Judith BETTY FRIEDAN An exhaustive, readable, forthright biography of the woman who, however truculent she may have been in both personal and political disputes, earned her way as one who launched the second-wave feminist revolution. Read full book review >
THE MEME MACHINE by Susan Blackmore
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1999

"So, enjoy the imaginative leaps and some pithy summaries of current theories and controversies regarding human evolution, but don't substitute the meme bathwater for the gene baby just yet."
Richard Dawkins gave us "memes," the cultural analogue of genes; Blackmore gives us memes in spades—humans as meme machines. Read full book review >

TALES OF THE LAVENDER MENACE by Karla Jay
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 1, 1999

"Thoughtful, witty and informative, this memoir captures the fervor and exuberance of those years when young idealists stenciled T-shirts and marched to change the world—and perhaps they did. (8 pages photos, not seen)"
Oh, to be young and a radical lesbian in the late 1960s and early '70s—here is a sharp and funny account of what it was like. Read full book review >
NO FUTURE WITHOUT FORGIVENESS by Desmond Mpilo Tutu
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 5, 1999

"In its sober depiction and searing indictment of evil and in its never-maudlin advocacy of love, this is a masterpiece. (Author tour)"
The story of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and a meditation on evil and forgiveness from Nobel laureate Tutu (The Rainbow People of God: The Making of a Peaceful Revolution, 1994). Read full book review >
GEOGRAPHY OF HOME by Akiko Busch
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 1, 1999

"This cozy book provides provocative and intelligent insights that land close to home."
An appealing, insightful collection of musings on the architecture, psychology, and history of house and home in America. Read full book review >
WALLBANGIN' by Susan A. Phillips
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1999

"Perhaps the least hysterical exploration into the life of urban street gangs in the US to date. (13 color, 104 b&w photos, not seen)"
paper 0-226-66772-3 An anthropologist from UCLA constructs a semiotics for decoding the graffiti markings of street gangs. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 1999

"Despite the author's failure to heed his own minimalist advice, Gardner's thought-provoking vision of what schools ought to be should interest anyone who is concerned about the way they are now."
An exhaustive—and sometimes exhausting—analysis of education's purpose across time, distance, and discipline, by an author who insists, paradoxically, that when it comes to learning, less is more. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 1999

"This is an analysis of neither Machiavelli nor leadership, but, rather, a partisan broadside for which Machiavelli serves as a useful prop."
American Enterprise Institute resident scholar Ledeen (Perilous Statecraft: An Insider's Account of the Iran-Contra Affair, 1988, etc.) offers an updated version of the rules for leadership laid down by Machiavelli. Read full book review >
NADIA, CAPTIVE OF HOPE by Fay Afaf Kanafani
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1999

"A moving narrative that passionately describes one Muslim woman's determination to lead a life of her own choosing."
A candid memoir from a Beirut-born Muslim woman who recounts the drama of her personal life against the backdrop of political violence and upheaval in the Middle East. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >