Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 68)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 17, 2003

"Whatever the explanation, the survival of the hospital was nothing short of a miracle, one that Silver captures with all due astonishment."
Fascinating footnote to Holocaust history that staggers the imagination, revealing the existence of a Jewish hospital in the heart of Berlin that treated patients to the very end of Hitler's reign. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 2, 2003

"An absolutely top-drawer exploration of racist politics and its strange players, who remain legion."
An utterly well-written, utterly fascinating study of a racially inspired murder in Oregon, documenting the mutant Nazism that emerged in the Reagan era. Read full book review >

NIXON’S SHADOW by David Greenberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Thought-provoking from start to finish."
"No postwar politician did more to educate Americans to the primacy of image in politics" than Richard Nixon. So argues historian Greenberg in a rich work full of lessons and implications for spin doctors. Read full book review >
THE WHITE HEADHUNTER by Nigel Randell
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"A fabulous ethnographic tale inside a larger tragedy of cultural genocide and retaliatory murders. (8 pp. b&w photos, maps, index)"
Documentary filmmaker Randell debuts with the story of a young Scottish sailor's eight-year stay on a South Pacific island. Read full book review >
SHE’S NOT THERE by Jennifer Finney Boylan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

"Serious, real, funny. Told so disarmingly that it's strong enough to defang a taboo. (Photographs)"
The limpid, soul-rich story of novelist James Boylan (Getting In, 1998, etc.) becoming Jennifer Boylan. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

"Great fun."
A lighthearted exploration of the human body, drawing on myth, religion, art, pop culture, history, biology, and any other -ology that suits the purpose here: to delight, astound, and inform. Read full book review >
THE SECRET LIFE OF A SCHOOLGIRL by Rosemary Kingsland
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 8, 2003

"Bitter and sweet memories in an affectionate recollection of an unusual past."
A remarkably forgiving account of the author's teenage affair with married actor Richard Burton and her youth in a turbulent household with congenitally self-absorbed parents. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 1, 2003

"A thoughtful, measured tone gives this tale of murder a sense of depth and reach, like a good poem."
Chilling, edgy backgrounder on the high-profile 2002 murder of a fashion journalist. Read full book review >
DRY by Augusten Burroughs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2003

"Didn't think you'd ever feel even an ounce of sympathy for—let alone root for—a drunken adman, did you? Meet Mr. Burroughs."
Like the alcohol he so enjoys, Burroughs's story of getting dry will go straight into your bloodstream and leave you buzzing, exhilarated, and wiped out. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 1, 2003

"A rich and provocative intellectual feast."
An elegantly written, perceptive analysis of the tensions common to the immigration experience. Read full book review >
THE TEAMMATES by David Halberstam
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 14, 2003

"A string of pearly anecdotes that reverberate far beyond the diamond."
Affectionate, informed, and smooth-as-cream portrait of four Boston Red Sox greats and their abiding friendship over many years. Read full book review >
BEAUTY BEFORE COMFORT by Allison Glock
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 6, 2003

"A memoir as elemental as its subject: pulsing, fetching, leaving a strong afterglow. (20 photos)"
Glock debuts with a lovely, blue memoir of her maternal grandmother, a vital square peg in the poor, round hole of a hard-baked West Virginia town. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Chris Cleave
June 14, 2016

In bestseller Chris Cleave’s latest novel Everyone Brave Is Forgiven, it’s London, 1939. The day war is declared, Mary North leaves finishing school unfinished, goes straight to the War Office, and signs up. Tom Shaw decides to ignore the war—until he learns his roommate Alistair Heath has unexpectedly enlisted. Then the conflict can no longer be avoided. Young, bright, and brave, Mary is certain she’d be a marvelous spy. When she is—bewilderingly—made a teacher, she finds herself defying prejudice to protect the children her country would rather forget. Tom, meanwhile, finds that he will do anything for Mary. And when Mary and Alistair meet, it is love, as well as war, that will test them in ways they could not have imagined, entangling three lives in violence and passion, friendship and deception, inexorably shaping their hopes and dreams. “Among all the recent fictions about the war, Cleave’s miniseries of a novel is a surprising standout,” our reviewer writes, “with irresistibly engaging characters who sharply illuminate issues of class, race, and wartime morality.” View video >