Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 68)

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 2001

"Vividly told, full of striking detail, and utterly fascinating."
The shift from hunting to farming is a major watershed in human history. Here, an anthropologist describes the worldview of surviving hunting cultures. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2001

"'New York has taught me to put capital and capitalists closer to the center of modern history,' Beckert writes. His account is a dazzlingly successful exercise in doing just that."
A fascinating history of New York during the late 19th-century, a time when big money was changing the face of the city. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2001

"A valuable and extensive collection, intelligently edited."
Ginsberg, voluble when not downright loquacious, gave hundreds of interviews over his 40-year career; Carter has chosen generously for this new gathering, including many previously uncollected. Read full book review >
A LIFE OF JUNG by Ronald Hayman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2001

"Likely to become the standard biography of the revolutionary psychoanalyst. (16 pp. photos, not seen)"
A polished, highly professional biography of Jung that covers all the personal and intellectual bases, as well as demystifying his more rarified theories, from Hayman (Thomas Mann, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >
STILL LOVE IN STRANGE PLACES by Beth Kephart
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2001

"Particularly notable for the sinewy authorial voice, susceptible yet also dauntless and alert, conveying powerful insights with a strong eye for detail and color and a sure sense of what is important at a particular time and place. (19 b&w photos)"
A turbulent family drama enfolded in a nation's story. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 2001

"Lucid, often surprisingly funny: a very welcome contribution to our understanding of this tragic nation."
An instructive memoir by an Afghan-American thrust into the news after September 11, 2001. Read full book review >
THE UNWANTED by Kien Nguyen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 20, 2001

"Nguyen delivers a suspenseful tale rather than a sob story: anyone looking for a firsthand insight into America's tangled relations with Vietnam will not be disappointed."
In this compelling memoir, the son of an anonymous American GI and a wealthy Vietnamese woman relives ten years of hell in South Vietnam after the fall of Saigon. Read full book review >
RAISING FENCES by Michael Datcher
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 5, 2001

"A beautiful story of real-life redemption."
This honest, brisk, and ultimately very moving memoir offers a strong alternative to the stereotype of the "playa": the irresponsible young black man who preys on women and nonchalantly fathers children out of wedlock. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 1, 2001

"A necrobibliac classic (in the tradition of Nancy Mitford's American Way of Death): it may keep you up all night—not from fear but from fascination."
Grave matters are treated with wit and erudition in this study of premature burial throughout Western history, from physician Bondeson (The London Monster, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2001

"A groundbreaking work: The hammer of Ozment's silvery prose and sturdy logic shatters the surprisingly fragile theories of some of the trendiest historians of the human family. (6 halftones, 4 line illustrations)"
Ozment (Flesh and Spirit, 1999, etc.) argues persuasively that medieval and early Renaissance families displayed in abundance many of the characteristics of modern ones. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2001

"A dense, detailed, and insightful history."
From a journalist and member of one of Birmingham's leading families, a vivid, admirably nuanced, and wide-ranging history of the city that became ground zero in the Civil Rights struggle as black children marched, the white establishment wrestled with the need to change, and the Ku Klux Klan engaged in murderous bombings. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 6, 2001

"Biting, entertaining, erudite—destined to annoy, but also perhaps challenge, the politically correct on the right or the left."
The always provocative essayist for The Nation presents a collection of her biweekly columns dating from 1994 to fall 2000—including impeachment but before chads. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >