Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 68)

HISTORY
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"An extraordinary, fascinating set of firsthand accounts from the revolutionary era."
Poignant documents on the collapse of an old world, mixed with learned commentary: an outstanding work of history. Read full book review >
POLITICS by Hendrik Hertzberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 13, 2004

"Superb writing, subtle thinking. Just the thing for politics junkies and journalism buffs, especially those wondering who merits wearing Izzy Stone's mantle today."
One of American journalism's brightest intellectual lights shines forth in a fine—and long overdue—selection from four decades of work. Read full book review >

THE CHURCH THAT FORGOT CHRIST by Jimmy Breslin
RELIGION
Released: July 6, 2004

"The authorities will cry foul, but you can bet American Catholics will be reading and discussing Breslin's latest—and justly so."
A searing indictment of the faithful against a church that has failed their faith, with legendary New York newsman Breslin driving the nails into the cathedral door. Read full book review >
THE NEW WORLD OF MARTIN CORTÉS by Anna Lanyon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2004

"Luminous proof that history glows with emotion. (11 b&w illustrations)"
Lanyon's graceful, compelling account of her pursuit of the story of the son of Hernán Cortés and Malinche, an Amerindian woman who was the subject of the author's Malinche's Conquest (2000). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2004

"Scholarly and entertaining, written with a keen eye for the politics, but never forsaking the pleasures. (16-page color insert, not seen)"
An irreproachably researched and amusingly written history of European monarchs' jezebels. Read full book review >

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 8, 2004

"Lives up to the billing as 'a travel, adventure, humor, memoir kind of book'—and a really good one, at that."
Newcomer Troost nests on a tiny island in the vast Pacific, finding it strange and unappealing, though not utterly without its pleasures. Read full book review >
STATUS ANXIETY by Alain de Botton
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 1, 2004

"An intelligent breath of fresh air, sans the usual ax-grinding."
A novelist (Kiss and Tell, 1996, etc.) with a flair for gleaning self-help from across the ages (The Consolations of Philosophy, 2000) cleverly deconstructs and demystifies that sinking feeling of material inferiority. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: June 1, 2004

"A highly provocative work of popular science."
Can human nature be reduced to a set of laws that can then be used to organize society? By this intriguing account, many a physicist is now exploring such a question. Read full book review >
TRUTH & BEAUTY by Ann Patchett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 14, 2004

"A tough and loving tribute, hard to put down, impossible to forget."
In her first nonfiction, novelist Patchett (Bel Canto, 2001, etc.) paints a deeply moving portrait of friendship between two talented writers, illuminating the bond between herself and poet Lucy Grealy. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 11, 2004

"Roiling, confrontational family portrait."
A tenaciously engaged memoir from Levine (Harmful to Minors, 2002, etc.) about her relationship with her parents as her father drifts deeper and deeper into Alzheimer's. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 10, 2004

"A worried, restless, and haunted piece of work, tattooed and scarred from beginning to end."
The author of Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight (2002) takes a demon-haunted tour of Zimbabwe and Mozambique in the company of an ex-soldier who fought with the Rhodesian Light Infantry. Read full book review >
A DEATH IN BRAZIL by Peter Robb
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 5, 2004

"An affectionate, probing cultural portrait, as stark as it is entertaining."
Under intellectual scrutiny from a part-time resident, the world's fifth largest country comes alive as "the oddest and most thrilling" in our hemisphere. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >