Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 7)

#ASKGARYVEE by Gary Vaynerchuk
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"Tactical career wisdom essential for both budding and veteran entrepreneurs."
An informative book-length question-and-answer session with a leading American entrepreneur. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 8, 2016

"An authoritative account of the challenges facing progressives wishing to fuse better governance with economic justice."
An energetic if grim discussion of inequality and the coming era of underemployment, viewed through the lens of the forgotten American progressive narrative. Read full book review >

THE END OF KARMA by Somini Sengupta
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2016

"A compelling portrait of what will soon be the world's most populous nation, one on the verge of great change—for better or worse."
India's young population is growing dramatically, writes Indian-American journalist Sengupta—and it's growing impatient with the roadblocks its elders have erected. Read full book review >
BLUE IN A RED STATE by Justin Krebs
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"From Massachusetts and Florida to Montana and Alaska, with each chapter, both conservative and liberal readers will react strongly, but most will do nothing about it. Hopefully, however, the book will spur discussion and civic action."
Krebs (538 Ways to Live, Work, and Play Like a Liberal, 2010) seeks to paint a portrait of liberals living among the enemy, as it were, by choice.Read full book review >
THE MATH MYTH by Andrew Hacker
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"Hacker's arguments may convince some anxious students and be welcomed by their parents, but the reaction from academics is sure to be mixed."
A lively argument against the assumption that if the United States is to stay competitive in a global economy, our students require advanced training in mathematics. Read full book review >

STAND BY ME by Jim Downs
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2016

"An intelligent and thought-provoking though somewhat limited addition to the historical record of the gay liberation movement."
Downs (History/Connecticut Coll.; Sick from Freedom: African-American Illness and Suffering during the Civil War and Reconstruction, 2012, etc.) aims to dispel the misconception that gay liberation in the 1970s was primarily focused on sexual freedom. Read full book review >
REDSKINS by C. Richard King
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"In the meantime, King shows why this controversy matters well beyond the football field."
This academic analysis suggests that the team name of the NFL's Washington, D.C., franchise is both reprehensible and indefensible. Read full book review >
ALL THE SINGLE LADIES by Rebecca Traister
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"An easy read with lots of good anecdotes, a dose of history, and some surprising statistics, but its focus on one segment of one generation of single women is a drawback."
A feminist journalist argues that single women, who now outnumber married women in the United States, are changing society in major ways. Read full book review >
A MURDER OVER A GIRL by Ken Corbett
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 1, 2016

"An emotionally resonant account of a real-life tragedy."
A teenager's murder raises issues of bullying and homophobia. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"An uplifting testimonial to the power of unconditional familial love and acceptance."
A new family must regroup after their toddler exhibits gender ambivalence. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"The old pep talk by another proficient motivational master, updated with references to Twitter, YouTube, and, of course, TED."
A self-help book from a communications coach and respected keynote speaker. Read full book review >
AMERICAN GIRLS by Nancy Jo Sales
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"For parents with young daughters, this book is an ice-cold, important wake-up call."
What happens to teenage girls when their social lives play out online? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >