Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 7)

THE BATTLE FOR ROOM 314 by Ed Boland
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"An unflinchingly honest account of one man's experiences with inner-city education."
A nonprofit executive tells the story of the year he spent as a teacher in a struggling urban high school on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Read full book review >
INCARCERATION NATIONS by Baz Dreisinger
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"An eye-opening, damning indictment of the American prison system and the way its sins reverberate around the globe."
A writer and social activist chronicles her visits to prisons around the globe to gain insight into what works and doesn't work. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A usefully organized, concise history of social movements that will appeal to newer generations of activists."
Optimistic overview of the recent surge in politically directed, nonviolent mass advocacy movements, focused on historical examples and the tactical future. Read full book review >
UNTANGLED by Lisa Damour
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Expert information and counsel on helping parents raise well-rounded girls."
The director of the Laurel School's Center for Research on Girls offers parents concrete advice on how to help their teenage daughters navigate the often tumultuous teenage years. Read full book review >
LIT UP by David Denby
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An upbeat portrait of fine teachers and the students they inspire."
Teenagers encounter great books and dedicated teachers. Read full book review >

CHILDREN OF PARADISE by Laura Secor
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An insightful chronicle of bloody repression and brave defiance."
A close look at Iranian culture and politics from the 1979 revolution to the present. Read full book review >
INTEGRATION NATION by Susan E. Eaton
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"From Indiana to Georgia to Maine, these intelligent model programs should inspire others."
Pragmatic approaches to incorporating the enormous waves of immigrants arriving in the United States. Read full book review >
BLACKBALLED by Lawrence Ross
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"'Racism is icky to talk about, as everyone usually retreats to their comfortable box when dealing with it,' Ross admits, but his biting critique may fuel much-needed conversation."
An impassioned indictment of racism in predominantly white institutions of higher learning. Read full book review >
ORIGINALS by Adam Grant
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A mixed bag but of interest to readers looking to jump-start their creative powers and raise quick-witted children."
A blend of old and new—and sometimes original—informs this pop-science piece on creativity and its discontents. Read full book review >
HELL IS A VERY SMALL PLACE by Jean  Casella
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A potent cry of anguish from men and women buried way down in the hole."
The founders of a watchdog group dedicated to stopping the practice of solitary confinement gather voices from victims of this hellish punishment. Read full book review >
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING LITTLE by Erika Christakis
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A deep, provocative analysis of the current modes of teaching preschoolers and what should be changed to create a more effective learning environment for everyone."
An early childhood educator offers fresh advice on how parents and teachers should be interacting with preschool children to achieve better overall results. Read full book review >
THE BLACK PRESIDENCY by Michael Eric Dyson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"Dyson succeeds admirably in creating a base line for future interpretations of this historic presidency. His well-written book thoroughly illuminates the challenges facing a black man elected to govern a society that is far from post-racial."
An early assessment of America's first black presidency. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >