Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 7)

TO BE ISRAELI by Yair Lapid
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"By turns gloomy, patriotic, defensive, and gracious, Lapid's reflective tone will both resonate with and arouse the ire of many."
Short essays on a changing, vilified Israeli identity. Read full book review >
MESSY by Tim Harford
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Though not all readers will find this unconventional perspective on disorder particularly sage, Harford's exploration is entertaining and, despite the topic, well-constructed."
An award-winning economist celebrates the myriad advantages of clutter and disarray. Read full book review >

THE BOOK OF ISAIAS by Daniel Connolly
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A story of one child of illegal immigrants that has much wider, timely resonance."
Being a child of Hispanic immigrants in modern America. Read full book review >
THE GREAT DERANGEMENT by Amitav Ghosh
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 2016

"A slim but certainly significant contribution to the climate crisis dialogue sure to provoke discussion and increased awareness about our imperiled planet."
Fair warning on the perils of ignoring climate change. Read full book review >
THE BITCH IS BACK by Cathi Hanauer
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 1, 2016

"A provocative collection about 'what happens later, after those frantic, demanding, exhausting years with work and very young kids and, sometimes, not enough money.'"
Successful women writers reflect on being mature and female in early-21st-century America. Read full book review >

LONE WOLF TERRORISM by Jeffrey D. Simon
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Some of Simon's research validates common-sense conclusions about extreme human behavior, but the book contains enough fresh findings to recommend it to those who want to delve into such dark corners."
In the second edition of his book originally published in 2013, Simon (The Terrorist Trap: America's Experience with Terrorism, 1994, etc.) focuses his scholarship on spree killers who act alone or with minimal assistance. Read full book review >
SING FOR YOUR LIFE by Daniel Bergner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A disjointed structure occasionally hobbles this swiftly written life story of music, forgiveness, and resilience."
The biography of an emerging African-American opera singer who overcame a tough Southern childhood. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"An intelligent, rigorous manifesto that could use more direction for action."
An impassioned social and political critique with glimmers of hope for change. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A fruitful if arguable thesis yields a book worth reading in this election year."
A stimulating look at the presidency from the vantage point of the wars America has fought—and, in some instances, the none-too-noble reasons for them. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A thoughtful and enthusiastic analysis of how more and more people are inventing and creating truly remarkable products and services."
The story behind modern tinkerers, inventors, and creators of all sorts of good stuff. Read full book review >
BLOOD AT THE ROOT by Patrick Phillips
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"An impressive reckoning with a shameful piece of the past that 'most natives of Forsyth would prefer to leave…scattered in the state's dusty archives or safely hidden in plain sight.'"
A history of white supremacy's endurance in a Georgia county. Read full book review >
TRAINWRECK by Sady Doyle
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"A well-rounded, thoughtful analysis of what can make and break a woman when she's placed in the spotlight."
How and why women are alternately idolized and then given hell for being the way they are. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >