Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 8)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Clear, easily digestible pop psychology."
A guide to defending oneself from narcissism in the selfie age. Read full book review >
BIG MAGIC by Elizabeth Gilbert
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Not earth shattering but warmly inspirational."
The bestselling author of Eat, Pray, Love reflects on what it means to pursue a creative life.Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"A rarefied and compelling study."
A dense, thoughtful study by a Mauritius-born native achieves the right distance from and intimacy with his subject. Read full book review >
THE SOCIAL SEX by Marilyn Yalom
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Such unsupportable assertions, heartfelt though they may be, undermine the authors' considerable research."
How sisterhood has flourished throughout history. Read full book review >
POPULATION WARS by Greg Graffin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"The science lectures are occasionally long-winded, but Graffin's message is challenging, and the professional entertainer shines through."
While the title suggests another dire warning of a coming explosion in the world's population, in fact, the term "population wars" as used here refers to a historical pattern of populations brought into contact with one another, the ensuing conflicts, and the resulting assimilations. Read full book review >

A NATION OF NATIONS by Tom Gjelten
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A timely, well-informed entry into a national debate."
An incisive look at immigration, assimilation, and national identity. Read full book review >
THE ONLY WOMAN IN THE ROOM by Eileen Pollack
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Hard-hitting, difficult to read, and impossible to put down."
An unvarnished account of what it was like, in the mid-1970s, to be "one of the first two women to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in physics at Yale." Read full book review >
BLACK MAN IN A WHITE COAT by Damon Tweedy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"In this unsparingly honest chronicle, Tweedy cohesively illuminates the experiences of black doctors and black patients and reiterates the need for improved understanding of racial differences within global medical communities."
An arresting memoir that personalizes the enduring racial divide in contemporary American medicine. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"The author's extensive knowledge of lifestyles and simple, concise writing combine for an enjoyable book showing how families have joined, separated, and rejoined over the last 500 years."
Social historian Flanders (The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens' London, 2014, etc.) follows the evolution of the home from an edifice offering minimal shelter to present-day standards.Read full book review >
PAID FOR by Rachel Moran
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Moran's thoughtful, highly readable, and provocative treatise shines a necessary light on a dark and underdiscussed topic."
Leaving her Dublin home and dysfunctional family at 14, Moran became homeless before she turned to prostitution to survive. Her stirring memoir chronicles her seven-year journey on the streets and in the brothels and examines the costs to society and her soul. Read full book review >
THIRTY MILLION WORDS by Dana Suskind
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Informative, exciting new data that confirms the significant benefits gained by talking to your child."
New research demonstrating the importance of communicating with your child right from birth. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Inspiring and necessary reading for all Americans interested in social justice."
The history of the struggle for gay rights in the United States. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >