Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 8)

TRIBE by Sebastian Junger
HISTORY
Released: May 24, 2016

"The themes implicit in the author's bestsellers are explicit in this slim yet illuminating volume."
A short book with a solid argument about the downside of civilization's progress. Read full book review >
HELPING CHILDREN SUCCEED by Paul Tough
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 24, 2016

"Informative and effective methods to help children overcome issues and thrive at home and in school."
Straightforward advice on how to help children overcome adversity at home and in school. Read full book review >

The Human Animal by Don Nelson
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: May 23, 2016

"A flawed, curmudgeonly critique of humanity."
Debut author Nelson offers a plea for creative ideas to solve the problems of the modern era. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"A forthright testimony by a witness to history."
Triumphs and frustrations mark the author's long legal career. Read full book review >
LABOR OF LOVE by Moira Weigel
HISTORY
Released: May 17, 2016

"An earnest plea to think about love mindfully."
Dating undermines authenticity, the author claims. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: May 17, 2016

"An intellectual and provocative perspective challenging Christians and others to reconsider the confines of spiritual interconnection, harmony, and progressive inclusion in modern religion."
In the latest installment of the publisher's enterprising Queer Action/Queer Ideas series, queer Episcopal priest and political strategist Edman brings a fresh approach to the ongoing conundrum between the LGBTQ community and Christianity. Read full book review >
THE BOYS IN THE BUNKHOUSE by Dan Barry
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Gently, empathetically, and indelibly, Barry conveys a tale of unthinkable brutality."
A gripping indictment of society's treatment of "losers." Read full book review >
THE UNDERDOGS by Melissa Fay Greene
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 17, 2016

"Dog lovers, parents of special needs kids, and those who love feel-good stories will delight in these heartwarming portraits of dogs and their families."
Personal stories of service dogs in action. Read full book review >
STREET OF ETERNAL HAPPINESS by Rob Schmitz
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 17, 2016

"Probing human-interest stories that mine the heart of today's China."
A study of vastly changing China from the perspective of one busy street in the center of Shanghai. Read full book review >
BOY ERASED by Garrard Conley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"An engaging memoir that will inevitably make readers long for a more equal future."
In a sharp and shocking debut memoir, Conley digs deep into the ex-gay therapy system. Read full book review >
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE by Tom Vanderbilt
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 10, 2016

"Like it or not, there's much to behold in this exhaustively researched, intellectual assessment of human preference."
The science behind the choices we make. Read full book review >
FIRST DADS by Joshua Kendall
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"Rich in detail, this informative book gives new understanding to our nation's leaders and their offspring."
A look at the parenting practices of American presidents. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >