Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 8)

ME, MY HAIR, AND I by Elizabeth Benedict
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Surprisingly engaging reading."
A distinguished novelist gathers together essays that attempt to untangle the complicated relationship of females to their hair. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Fascinating and terrifying portraits of saints and ministers of grace."
A New Yorker staff writer delves into the strange lives and curious mindsets of extreme altruists. Read full book review >

UNFINISHED BUSINESS by Anne-Marie Slaughter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Informative guidance on how men and women can come together in the workforce and at home."
One woman's vision on how to create gender equality for men and women. Read full book review >
Why Leaders Fight by Michael C. Horowitz
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"A thoughtful re-examination of the causal agents that move history."
An exacting analysis of the way state leaders influence geopolitical events and, in turn, history at large. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 24, 2015

"A firm response to currently accepted dog-training methods."
A convincing guide for dog owners as well as a memoir of instructive adventures set in nature. Read full book review >

SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 23, 2015

"A fact-based and ultimately uplifting manual on the duty, strategy, and simple joy of giving to others."
A comprehensive study—and celebration—of the art and practice of charity. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Clear, easily digestible pop psychology."
A guide to defending oneself from narcissism in the selfie age. Read full book review >
BIG MAGIC by Elizabeth Gilbert
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Not earth shattering but warmly inspirational."
The bestselling author of Eat, Pray, Love reflects on what it means to pursue a creative life.Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"A rarefied and compelling study."
A dense, thoughtful study by a Mauritius-born native achieves the right distance from and intimacy with his subject. Read full book review >
THE SOCIAL SEX by Marilyn Yalom
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Such unsupportable assertions, heartfelt though they may be, undermine the authors' considerable research."
How sisterhood has flourished throughout history. Read full book review >
POPULATION WARS by Greg Graffin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"The science lectures are occasionally long-winded, but Graffin's message is challenging, and the professional entertainer shines through."
While the title suggests another dire warning of a coming explosion in the world's population, in fact, the term "population wars" as used here refers to a historical pattern of populations brought into contact with one another, the ensuing conflicts, and the resulting assimilations. Read full book review >
A NATION OF NATIONS by Tom Gjelten
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A timely, well-informed entry into a national debate."
An incisive look at immigration, assimilation, and national identity. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >