Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 9)

THE GOOD SHUFU by Tracy Slater
Released: June 30, 2015

"A heartfelt and moving tale, coupling insights into two remarkably different cultures with a love story that, as much as any true love story can, delivers a happy ending."
A writer goes to the far side of the world for work and finds a home. Read full book review >
Mirage of Afro-Feminism by Ishaya Albert
Released: June 26, 2015

"Suffers from the subordination of plot to its feminist message, but presents authentic perspectives on modern challenges in Nigeria."
Albert's debut novel explores women's roles in modern Nigeria. Read full book review >

Released: June 24, 2015

"Laymen beware, but curious and disciplined readers will find a useful examination of propaganda's pervasiveness."
An academic analysis of the ways in which propaganda still functions and influences ideology in contemporary society. Read full book review >
Released: June 23, 2015

"Few general readers will choose to wade through this lengthy, scathing report, but every American should be familiar with its findings."
A government report reveals Ferguson, Missouri's failed system. Read full book review >
End of the Rainbow by Bill Miller
Released: June 23, 2015

"A passionate call for social change."
An African-American novelist muses upon the world's enduring racial tensions in this nonfiction work. Read full book review >

Suicide by Simon Critchley
Released: June 23, 2015

"A brief yet erudite and compellingly original survey that will provoke both personal thought and lively group discussion."
A unique dialectic on the contentious phenomenon of suicide from a noted British philosopher and academic. Read full book review >
Released: June 16, 2015

"Often hilarious, consistently informative, and unusually helpful."
The ever hip and funny comedian and Parks and Recreation star embarks on a surprisingly insightful exploration of the complex realities of dating today. Read full book review >
Maimonides & Metabolism by Rabbi Yonason Herschlag
Released: June 12, 2015

"Readers looking to understand all the factors in weight-loss management will find this a good supplement to material produced by experts."
A reconsideration of the physiology of weight loss, supported by the writings of the Jewish philosopher Maimonides. Read full book review >
TWISTED by Bert Ashe
Released: June 9, 2015

"Sometimes hair is just hair, though the dreadlocked professor rarely leaves it at that."
Much ado about dreadlocks. Read full book review >
Released: June 9, 2015

"Provides unique insights into a community intent on moving forward."
A former gang leader and an academic researcher team up to bring about change in a struggling community. Read full book review >
Released: June 9, 2015

"A potent introduction to a nearly forgotten part of the civil rights movement and a personalized reminder of what it was truly about."
A powerful memoir of the civil rights movement, specifically the dramatic struggle to integrate the schools in Prince Edward County, Virginia. Read full book review >
Released: June 9, 2015

"A provocative discussion of how public investment and private entrepreneurship can combine to shape future advantages from existing used and unused capacities."
Drawing on her business success, Internet entrepreneur and internationally respected transport expert Chase details how digital infrastructure can be used to organize excess capacity and generate profit in service businesses. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >