Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 9)

DOOR TO DOOR by Edward Humes
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 12, 2016

"A revealing look at the reality and impact of our 'buy-it-now, same-day-delivery, traffic-packed world.'"
The story of the massive, complex global system that transports people and things from door to door, day and night. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2016

"Good advice backed by research coupled with personal reflections by a father on how to let children grow up to be individuals rather than miniature versions of their parents."
A man opens up about his shortcomings as a father. Read full book review >

THE FIGHT FOR FIFTEEN by David Rolf
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A savvy inside look at the social movement challenging decades of stark economic decline."
An expert exploration of a provocative blueprint for rescuing the American middle class through the creation of a new living wage. Read full book review >
THE GOLDEN CONDOM by Jeanne Safer
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 5, 2016

"A highly relatable collection of anecdotes that serves as a valuable crash course on the pitfalls, seductions, and rewards of love."
A psychoanalyst dissects the raptures and torments of love through a series of case studies. Read full book review >
PRETENTIOUSNESS by Dan Fox
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 5, 2016

"Not as provocative as it might be, but never pretentious."
A short book puts a positive spin on a term of almost universal disparagement. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 5, 2016

"With its academic tone and spirited, convincing vision, revolutionary new insights can be gleaned from this book on how to approach life's multifarious situations with both heart and head."
A popular college instructor explains how ancient Chinese thought can be applied to everyday life. Read full book review >
SLEEPING GIANT by Tamara Draut
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 5, 2016

"Readers who concur that we have a 'neoliberal economic system that is systematically rotten to the core' will welcome Draut's impassioned report; others may be unmoved."
A close examination of the plight of the working class, the decline of organized labor's political power, and the stirrings of activism that indicate change may be on the way. Read full book review >
WHERE THE LIGHT GETS IN by Kimberly Williams-Paisley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A simply told, moving memoir."
An actress tells the story of how her mother's dementia changed their relationship and affected their family. Read full book review >
SEX IN THE MUSEUM by Sarah Forbes
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A provocative chronicle steeped in eyebrow-raising details and personal honesty."
Dispatches from the front lines of the "Smithsonian of Sex." Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 5, 2016

"Easy-to-read, up-to-date information on the latest research into pregnancy, childbirth, and early childhood."
The latest scientific findings on child-rearing from pregnancy through toddlerhood. Read full book review >
THE GRAY RHINO by Michele Wucker
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 5, 2016

"A valuable guide for individuals and policymakers who want to act when they see the lights of an oncoming train."
An analysis of "highly obvious but ignored threats"—from failing infrastructure to financial crises to climate change—and what can be done to prevent disastrous outcomes. Read full book review >
EVERYDAY SEXISM by Laura Bates
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 5, 2016

"A potent reminder of how far feminism has come and how far it has to go."
A British feminist activist gathers together stories from women worldwide about gender-based denigration suffered in both private and public spheres. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >