Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 9)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 29, 2016

"Akron glitters like never before in these illuminating pages."
An economist/public policy adviser and a financial journalist envision a transformative resurgence in industrial regions that had threatened to rust from within. Read full book review >
ENGINES OF LIBERTY by David Cole
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 29, 2016

"Cole's book is compelling, especially in today's climate of gridlock following the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. While the title of the book proposes a how-to for the average person, however, the precept becomes fuzzy when these champions are NRA presidents, Harvard lawyers, and other highly visible proponents."
An analysis of how Constitutional law can be changed by principled and committed people who work outside the system rather than within it. Read full book review >

Witness to Greatness by Obi Nwasokwa
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 23, 2016

"A book that offers a worthwhile reflection on racial relations in America but a hagiographic interpretation of Obama's presidency."
A self-described admirer of President Barack Obama makes the case for his greatness. Read full book review >
WHY BE JEWISH? by Edgar M. Bronfman
RELIGION
Released: March 22, 2016

"One man's personal call to laggard Jews to study, learn, and seek justice in a broken world. Readers of other persuasions may also profit from his insight into bits of Jewish thought and practice."
The late businessman and philanthropist answers his title's question with a last testament of sorts. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 22, 2016

"An imaginative take on teaching sure to inspire controversy."
An award-winning educator proposes radical changes. Read full book review >

THE CRIME OF ALL CRIMES by Nicole Rafter
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 22, 2016

"A comparative criminological approach to genocide, bloodless in pursuit of scientific inquiry and most appropriate for students and specialists."
A criminologist attempts to understand genocide and its etiology. Read full book review >
THE MIND CLUB by Daniel M. Wegner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 22, 2016

"Complex science lightly delivered; a pleasure for anyone comfortable with the thought that knowing others' minds will improve our own."
Do the dead have thoughts? The late Harvard psychology professor Wegner (The Illusion of Conscious Will, 2002, etc.), assisted by neuroscientist Gray (Mind Perception and Morality/Univ. of North Carolina), ponders that ethereal question and much more.Read full book review >
LIFE REIMAGINED by Barbara Bradley Hagerty
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 15, 2016

"For midlifers eager to 'create a new habit of mind,' Hagerty is a rousing cheerleader."
An upbeat look at the joys of middle age. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 15, 2016

"Thoughtful political theory for divisive times."
Longtime national affairs writer Woodard (American Nation: A History of Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America, 2011, etc.) builds on his previous analysis of the country's regional differences to focus on the conflict between individualism and collectivism that defines our national character.Read full book review >
The End of Democracy and Faith by Sean Wallace
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 15, 2016

"A sometimes-intriguing but often familiar treatise against the oppressive forces of democracy and religion."
In this debut work of political philosophy, Wallace argues that American society is hindered by the twin restraints of democracy and religion. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 12, 2016

"A lengthy manifesto for AMCAP that lays out a vision for an ascendant black America."
Rempson (Minority Access to Higher Education In N.Y. City, 1972) examines what he sees as the root causes of education and economic-mobility gaps that affect African-American males.Read full book review >
BULLIES by Alex Abramovich
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"A sharp, provocative memoir of an unlikely friendship."
A journalist's account of his friendship with a man who was not only president of a motorcycle group, but also the boy who bullied him during childhood. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >