Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 9)

FEAR AND CLOTHING by Cintra Wilson
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Prime sartorial satire for fashionistas aching for a dose of comic relief. Few write as bitingly about pop culture as Wilson."
Irreverent, outspoken culture critic Wilson (Caligula for President: Better American Living Through Tyranny, 2008, etc.) charts the "discovery of my own fashion evolution" through an American road trip.Read full book review >
WHAT PHILOSOPHY CAN DO by Gary Gutting
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Somewhat less supple than Simon Blackburn's Think (1999) as a general introduction to philosophy but an excellent, readable, and eminently practical guide."
It can't take you to the airport, but philosophy, as this spirited book argues, can do all sorts of great things—including contribute to our happiness. Read full book review >

THE PRIZE by Dale Russakoff
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"An absorbing entry into the burgeoning genre about necessary education reforms."
The story of Chris Christie, Cory Booker, Mark Zuckerberg, and the $100 million grant for fixing New Jersey—and possibly all American—schools. Read full book review >
NEGROLAND by Margo Jefferson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Jefferson swings the narrative back and forth through her life, exploring the tides of racism, opportunity, and dignity while also provocatively exploring the inherent contradictions for Jefferson and her family members in working so tirelessly to differentiate themselves."
From a Pulitzer Prize-winning theater and book critic, a memoir about being raised in upper-class black Chicago, where families worked tirelessly to distance themselves as much from lower-class black people as from white people. Read full book review >
Fight Like A Physicist by Jason, PhD Thalken
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 7, 2015

"An enlightening book for martial artists seeking a competitive edge."
Thalken explores how physics can be applied to martial arts. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A powerful, timely story told with method and dignity."
A sweeping study of the fastest growing group in the United States that underscores the shameful racist regard white Americans have long held for Asian immigrants. Read full book review >
THE ISRAELI MIND by Alon Gratch
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A solid overview of how psychology, rather than violence, might provide the way to peace."
An attempt "to forge a comprehensive, provocative, and accessible narrative about the Israeli mind." Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"The Bennetts administer a highly informative and entertaining smack down to get your head on straight."
Psychiatrist Michael Bennett and his comedy-writer daughter, Sarah, combine to demonstrate "why self-improvement is hard and sometimes impossible, even when we're strong-willed and well guided." Read full book review >
INVISIBLE IN AUSTIN by Javier Auyero
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A scholarly study conducted with dignity and thoroughness."
A sociological study focusing on the experiences of 11 characters toiling in the underbelly of a vibrant American city. Read full book review >
DATE-ONOMICS by Jon Birger
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Informative and possibly useful to single readers."
A freelance journalist's study of why young single women "struggle to find marriage-material men" while men "with less going for them seem to have little trouble with the opposite sex." Read full book review >
$2.00 A DAY by Kathryn J. Edin
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An eye-opening account of the lives ensnared in the new poverty cycle."
An analysis of the growing portion of American poor who live on an average of $2 per day. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Useful for anyone with a horse in the race regarding law enforcement—in other words, most American citizens."
A handbook for making sense of America's approach to crime and incarceration and its effect on communities across the country. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >