Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 9)

UNTANGLED by Lisa Damour
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Expert information and counsel on helping parents raise well-rounded girls."
The director of the Laurel School's Center for Research on Girls offers parents concrete advice on how to help their teenage daughters navigate the often tumultuous teenage years. Read full book review >
LIT UP by David Denby
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An upbeat portrait of fine teachers and the students they inspire."
Teenagers encounter great books and dedicated teachers. Read full book review >

CHILDREN OF PARADISE by Laura Secor
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An insightful chronicle of bloody repression and brave defiance."
A close look at Iranian culture and politics from the 1979 revolution to the present. Read full book review >
INTEGRATION NATION by Susan E. Eaton
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"From Indiana to Georgia to Maine, these intelligent model programs should inspire others."
Pragmatic approaches to incorporating the enormous waves of immigrants arriving in the United States. Read full book review >
BLACKBALLED by Lawrence Ross
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"'Racism is icky to talk about, as everyone usually retreats to their comfortable box when dealing with it,' Ross admits, but his biting critique may fuel much-needed conversation."
An impassioned indictment of racism in predominantly white institutions of higher learning. Read full book review >

ORIGINALS by Adam Grant
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A mixed bag but of interest to readers looking to jump-start their creative powers and raise quick-witted children."
A blend of old and new—and sometimes original—informs this pop-science piece on creativity and its discontents. Read full book review >
HELL IS A VERY SMALL PLACE by Jean  Casella
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A potent cry of anguish from men and women buried way down in the hole."
The founders of a watchdog group dedicated to stopping the practice of solitary confinement gather voices from victims of this hellish punishment. Read full book review >
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING LITTLE by Erika Christakis
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A deep, provocative analysis of the current modes of teaching preschoolers and what should be changed to create a more effective learning environment for everyone."
An early childhood educator offers fresh advice on how parents and teachers should be interacting with preschool children to achieve better overall results. Read full book review >
THE BLACK PRESIDENCY by Michael Eric Dyson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"Dyson succeeds admirably in creating a base line for future interpretations of this historic presidency. His well-written book thoroughly illuminates the challenges facing a black man elected to govern a society that is far from post-racial."
An early assessment of America's first black presidency. Read full book review >
ONE CHILD by Mei Fong
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"Finished just before the announcement of the policy's demise, One Child is a touching and captivating anthropological investigation of one of the most invasive laws ever devised."
Widespread female infanticide and officials jailing pregnant women's families to induce them to surrender to abortions—these are scenes not from a dystopian novel but from China's family planning bureaucracy. Read full book review >
WHILE THE CITY SLEPT by Eli Sanders
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An exceptional story of compelling interest in a time of school shootings, ethnic and class strife, and other unbound expressions of madness and illness."
Disturbing, sometimes-horrifying story of true crime and justice only partially served. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A passionate discussion of race and politics sure to inspire heated debate and, hopefully, proactive solutions."
An activist treatise on how shifting American demographics are changing the political climate. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >