Social Sciences Book Reviews

Fight Like A Physicist by Jason, PhD Thalken
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 7, 2015

"An enlightening book for martial artists seeking a competitive edge."
Thalken explores how physics can be applied to martial arts. Read full book review >
BLACK MAN IN A WHITE COAT by Damon Tweedy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"In this unsparingly honest chronicle, Tweedy cohesively illuminates the experiences of black doctors and black patients and reiterates the need for improved understanding of racial differences within global medical communities."
An arresting memoir that personalizes the enduring racial divide in contemporary American medicine. Read full book review >

PAID FOR by Rachel Moran
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Moran's thoughtful, highly readable, and provocative treatise shines a necessary light on a dark and underdiscussed topic."
Leaving her Dublin home and dysfunctional family at 14, Moran became homeless before she turned to prostitution to survive. Her stirring memoir chronicles her seven-year journey on the streets and in the brothels and examines the costs to society and her soul. Read full book review >
THE GAY REVOLUTION by Lillian Faderman
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Inspiring and necessary reading for all Americans interested in social justice."
The history of the struggle for gay rights in the United States. Read full book review >
THE PRIZE by Dale Russakoff
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"An absorbing entry into the burgeoning genre about necessary education reforms."
The story of Chris Christie, Cory Booker, Mark Zuckerberg, and the $100 million grant for fixing New Jersey—and possibly all American—schools. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"The author's extensive knowledge of lifestyles and simple, concise writing combine for an enjoyable book showing how families have joined, separated, and rejoined over the last 500 years."
Social historian Flanders (The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens' London, 2014, etc.) follows the evolution of the home from an edifice offering minimal shelter to present-day standards.Read full book review >
WHAT PHILOSOPHY CAN DO by Gary Gutting
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Somewhat less supple than Simon Blackburn's Think (1999) as a general introduction to philosophy but an excellent, readable, and eminently practical guide."
It can't take you to the airport, but philosophy, as this spirited book argues, can do all sorts of great things—including contribute to our happiness. Read full book review >
NEGROLAND by Margo Jefferson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Jefferson swings the narrative back and forth through her life, exploring the tides of racism, opportunity, and dignity while also provocatively exploring the inherent contradictions for Jefferson and her family members in working so tirelessly to differentiate themselves."
From a Pulitzer Prize-winning theater and book critic, a memoir about being raised in upper-class black Chicago, where families worked tirelessly to distance themselves as much from lower-class black people as from white people. Read full book review >
FEAR AND CLOTHING by Cintra Wilson
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Prime sartorial satire for fashionistas aching for a dose of comic relief. Few write as bitingly about pop culture as Wilson."
Irreverent, outspoken culture critic Wilson (Caligula for President: Better American Living Through Tyranny, 2008, etc.) charts the "discovery of my own fashion evolution" through an American road trip.Read full book review >
THIRTY MILLION WORDS by Dana Suskind
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Informative, exciting new data that confirms the significant benefits gained by talking to your child."
New research demonstrating the importance of communicating with your child right from birth. Read full book review >
THE ONLY WOMAN IN THE ROOM by Eileen Pollack
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Hard-hitting, difficult to read, and impossible to put down."
An unvarnished account of what it was like, in the mid-1970s, to be "one of the first two women to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in physics at Yale." Read full book review >
A NATION OF NATIONS by Tom Gjelten
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A timely, well-informed entry into a national debate."
An incisive look at immigration, assimilation, and national identity. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >